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Patrick Coppedge
over 6 months ago

RESUME: CREATIVE WAYS TO LIST JOB SKILLS

List Job Skills Creatively On Your Resume

With the competition in the job market increasing for job seekers, it is crucial to grab the attention of the hiring manager if your resume has a chance. Employers are looking for resumes that showcase high quality skills and rich field experiences. To create a resume that stands out from the other candidates' resumes, focus on format and word choice.

A job candidate's skills and relevant knowledge are substantiated by the keywords they choose to use. Industry-specific core skills will enable a job candidate to successfully pass through an applicant tracking system (ATS), which is utilized by the majority of companies today to obtain the right candidates.

Each resume should be specific to the job you are applying for. You can easily locate the keywords a company is focused on by looking at the requirements listed for the job. If you have knowledge of, or experience using certain software programs listed in the job description, include them on your resume to draw employers' attention.

Simply highlighting keywords, however, is not enough to make your resume stand out. Due to the recent shift in resume trends, no longer are resumes merely a listing of jobs and duties. They are truly promotional materials. As such, it is no longer enough to say that you are a creative, motivational problem-solver. You need to demonstrate it. The challenge is greater for those who have been laid off or who have been out of work for an extended period of time. For these professionals, the task of proving that their skills are relevant can be more difficult than it is for other job seekers.

Job seekers need to add transferable skills that they've gained from paid and unpaid past experiences to their resumes. Transferable skills acquired during any activity from volunteer positions, classes, projects, parenting, hobbies and sports can be applicable to one's next job. By adding transferable skills to a resume, employers get a better understanding and broader picture of who they are hiring as well as the interests, values and experiences that the candidate brings to the table.

The idea is to explain your skills and experiences in a way that highlights any gains. Be specific and provide relevant statistics wherever you can. Revenue wins, client growth, and budget savings are easy to quantify and are impressive on your resume. Here are a few categories of skills you could include on your resume, along with unique ways to express them.

Interpersonal Communication

Jobs require teamwork. There will be constant exchanges with co-workers, and discussing and sharing ideas with supervisors. Employers want to know the level of communication skills you have and how well you work with others. The specific skills required will vary based on your position. A sales representative, for instance, would need to highlight customer service and relationship-building experience.

On your resume: writes clearly and concisely, listens attentively, negotiates/resolves differences, provides and asks for feedback, offers well-thought-out solutions, cooperates and works well with others, thrives in a collaborative environment.

Planning And Organization

If the job you want involves working on research projects and companywide campaigns, you want to show off your top-notch planning abilities. "Organization skills" may sound like an overused filler term, but those skills are the ones that will help you succeed. Show potential employers you've got what they're looking for by outlining your involvement in, and results from, current and previous projects.

On your resume: identifies and gathers appropriate resources, thoroughly researches background information, develops strategies, thinks critically to solve problems, coordinates and completes tasks, manages projects effectively, meets deadlines.

Management And Leadership

Although it may not always be easy to express them on a resume, management and leadership skills can be gained in a variety of conventional and unconventional ways.

Demonstrating your management abilities on paper requires you to think about what it is you do best as a leader and how you guide your fellow assiciates toward success. To give employers a better idea of what you've accomplished, discuss the size of the team and the scope of the projects you manage.

On your resume: teaches/trains/instructs, counsels/coaches, manages conflict, helps team members set and achieve goals, delegates effectively, makes and implements decisions, oversees projects.

Social Media

Social media is one of the most desired skills in a variety of job fields. Socially active organizations are more likely to attract top talent, drive new sales leads and better engage customers. Therefore, when employers look for new hires, they're also typically looking for new internal-brand ambassadors.

For positions directly involving work on corporate social media campaigns, hiring managers look for concrete numbers and metrics, including web traffic, audience reach and overall engagement.

On your resume: manages social media campaigns, measures and analyzes campaign results, identifies and connects with industry influencers, sparks social conversation within the brand's community, creates and executes content strategies, drives engagement and leads, enhances brand image through social presence.

Follow Me For Weekly Informative Articles Patrick Coppedge

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Omar Medeiros
over 6 months ago

Reliable Transportation Question?

What do employers consider to be reliable transportation? I see this question frequently asked on applications but I don’t know if managers want to know if I own a car or if I can get to the job on time. I don’t have a car right now but the bus system around my house and in the city gets me pretty much wherever I need to go. Would it be misleading on an application if I answer Yes or disqualify me from a job #interview if I tell them I don’t own my own car?

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Julie Jakubiec
over 6 months ago

My mistakes..

I don’t typically create posts that are personal to my own life but I really felt that this is relevant and relatable with what a lot of you are being faced with right now. I left college after a year because I decided that I didn’t “like” it and that if I was paying for it myself I should really love it, and I decided that I just wanted to work. I didn’t know what I wanted to do for work, but I thought it would be better than school. I can also remember the time, not so fondly, when I reached the point of desperation in needing work and was willing to do any and everything that was out there. One mistake I made during these early years was allowing myself to be influenced by what other people told me I would be good at instead of going after what I really wanted. So I started applying… to EVERYTHING. I didn’t stop to take the time to read the job descriptions, or the skill/experience requirements. I put my resume in for every job I came across that I thought “Sure, I could do that”. I literally applied for the same role on every open requisition that was available at each company or just applying to every role they had open. I kept telling the companies and myself that “I’ll do anything!”, I just wanted to work. What I didn’t realize is how that actually came across to potential employers, HR teams, recruiters, hiring managers, etc. It came across as a lack of focus and awareness of what I was actually qualified for and what I wanted to do both in the short and long term. During this time I didn’t even stop to think about how this could be perceived in a negative way. I thought that they would take my eagerness to work at the company as excitement, but I now know that I was wrong. As a result, I applied to a ton of jobs I wasn’t A. Qualified for or B. Interested in. And unfortunately, this landed me in a few positions that I very quickly knew were not the right fit and ended up back on the hunt for a job. I decided it was time to make a change, it was time to do some soul searching (very quick soul searching because I needed a job!) to figure out what the heck it was that I wanted to do, and whether or not I was being realistic in my expectations to be qualified for that job. It was really tough, and it probably took a little bit longer than I would have liked. But in the end it did lead me to a career that I love, and for me that was and still is worth it.

Ok, so I know you’re thinking “I don’t have time for that”. I get it, believe me I do. I just want to gently suggest that you take a few extra minutes to read through the job descriptions and be very honest with yourself on whether or not you possess all of the skills and requirements that they require before applying. Just think, those extra few minutes could potentially spare you having to restart a job search because you realize you don’t like the job you just started. And from an employer or recruiter standpoint, it’s a professional “turn-off” to see applicants apply for roles that they’re not qualified for, and in most cases it’s because they haven’t fully read through the description/requirements. This can also result in decreasing your opportunity to work at the company in the future or on a different team. You are going to have significantly better chances of having your application or resume standout for something you’ve had experience doing rather than something you think you could do. This can potentially lead to providing you with a better chance for making it to the interview stage, and possibly to being hired. I know this isn’t a “one size fits all” type of situation, but it’s a gentle suggestion for more scenarios of a different way to look at things. We tend to get frustrated when we receive rejections emails or nothing at all. But we need to ask ourselves “Am I really qualified for that job?” and being honest with ourselves about that instead of putting the blame on the company or their hiring team.

In a perfect world we would all the time we need to find a job we love and be able to pay our bills during that time. Unfortunately this isn’t typically the case and money is a struggle so we need to always be working. But be thoughtful, this is your livelihood that we’re talking about and is a big part of your and your family’s lives.

As always, best of luck in your searches and on your interviews. Keep pushing and you will find what it is that you’re looking for! #interview #qualifications #awareness #beinghonestwithyourself #jobsearch

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kiara williams
over 6 months ago

walmart

i was just wondering how old do you have to be to work here and if the times would be able to work around my school hours

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Kathryn Morrison
over 6 months ago

Anything

Trying to find a job I'm not sure what you're looking for? I don't have a lot of experience in a store but I am willing to learn.

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Brandon danzey jr.
over 6 months ago

TO ALDI

At what age do you guys employ people

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James Curtis
over 6 months ago

I have a question

How old do you have to be to work at dicks sporting goods

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adrianna jackson
over 6 months ago

about working

what age do you hire , and are you even hiring for this summer

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Lamont Via
over 6 months ago

Weight limit?

What's the min. weight I should be expected to lift if I want a job as a package handler at UPS? Anybody know?

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Kevin Hixson
over 6 months ago

hi im looking for a job and i was a student at your dance academy.

hi my name is Kevin Hixson and I was wondering what is the age or requirements for this job?

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