#
Promotion
Share Topic
Report Content
Interested in this topic? Be the first to follow.
Ask a question
Sort by:
Cynthia Okonkwo
Bullet point
Follow
2 months ago

https://studio.youtube.com/video/pDvHvzM_sUQ/edit

#Career Success, #Recruitment, #Candidate Pool, #Onboarding, #First Day, #Training, #Workplace Culture, #Company Culture, #Professional Development, #Behavior, #Performance, #Duties, #Responsibilities, #Knowledge, #Skills, #Abilities, #Competencies, #Professional Development, #Promotion, #Collaboration, #Diversity, #Equity, #Inclusion, #Work-Life Balance, #Benefits, #Total Rewards, #Perks, #Employee Relations, #Equality, #Retirement, #Conflict Resolution, #Interpersonal Relationships, #Relationship Building, #Service, #Authority, #Respect, #Compliance, #Fair Treatment, #Protected Categories, #Legal Protections

Title: Don’t Get Fired! Thrive in Your Probationary Period

Greetings everyone! Welcome to my channel. Thanks for joining me for another video. You know that I’m on a mission to help you live your best career life and I’m doing so one video at a time. So, if you like the information that I bring to you, click the “thumbs-up” to let YouTube know that you want more information like this to come your way. Also, please share my videos with others who want to level up their career life. Finally, I would love for you to subscribe so that you get notified each time I release a new video.

Introduction:

Probationary, Provisional, Introductory, Orientation, Training, Initiation period, etc. They all refer to the first months to 1 year trial period after you start your new job. It's that crucial phase that determines your future with the company. It’s because you and your new employer use that time to decide if the two of you are a good fit for each other. While probationary periods vary in length of time and specific requirements, the goal remains the same for you, the employee: to secure your position and transition into a permanent role. If there’s such a thing these days.

We all know that starting a new job can be an exciting and nerve-wracking experience all at once. A while back, I did a video on three reasons why employees get fired during their probationary period. So, this video is a follow-up of sorts to that one, but I’m turning the tables today and sharing some proactive steps that you can take to increase your chances of achieving a successful probationary period with your employer.

Understand Your New Employer’s Probationary Period Strategy and Develop Your Own:

Most people still consider the probationary period as the initial months of the employer:employee relationship when employers evaluate new employees. The reality is that it is also the time for employees to evaluate their new employer. So below, I am sharing with you the ways that your new employer will assess your fit for the company. I am also sharing with you the corresponding strategy that you, as the new employee, should implement to successfully navigate the probationary period.

  1. Know that the first starting point of your new employer’s strategy is to assess if you have the necessary skills, knowledge, and cultural fit to be successful as an employee of the organization.

So, as the “new kid on the block,” you should ask your manager for a copy of your job description on your first day of work. Also, ask your manager how they define success on the job.

Take advantage of professional development opportunities offered by the company. Whether it's attending training sessions, workshops, or industry conferences, investing in your professional development demonstrates your commitment to continuous learning and growth. Even if your company’s budget is limited, take advantage of free and low-cost online personal and professional development opportunities through sites like Udemy, Teachable, Coursera, and others.

Exercise resilience, especially in the face of challenges or setbacks. Demonstrating resilience in overcoming obstacles showcases your ability to adapt and thrive in the face of a changing work environment.

Maintain a positive attitude and do not participate in workplace gossip. Your ability to maintain a high level of professionalism in your conduct, interactions, and work ethic will reflect positively on your character and commitment to the role.

Do your best to complete your assignments as requested and in a timely manner. If you can’t meet a deadline, ask your manager for a deadline extension.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions when you are not sure how to complete an assignment. Also, ask for a copy of your company’s employee handbook and read it from front to back to familiarize yourself with the company’s policies. Finally ask for a copy of the standard operating procedures for your position and department and follow them 100% when doing your work.

If you are ever unsure about a task, policy, or expectation, seek clarification from your manager or an authorized co-worker for guidance or clarification. It's better to ask questions and seek clarity than to make assumptions that could lead to mistakes or a misunderstanding that could jeopardize your employment.

  1. During the probationary period, your employer will expect you to demonstrate your job-related abilities and meet performance expectations outlined in their job descriptions.

This is why it is so important for you to ask for a copy of your job description. It will contain the exact duties that you will be expected to perform. It is also crucial that you know how your manager will determine your success on the job. So, ask him/her how they determine on-the-job success.

During your probationary period, read your job description as a part of your getting ready for work each day during your probationary period. Think about your performance on the last day that you worked and honestly think how good of a job you did. Identify areas where you may need to improve. Think of ways that you can do a better job and implement those improvements into your work performance the next time you work. Also be ready and willing to take on additional responsibilities when appropriate. This will help you to get better at your job faster.

Your initiative and proactive approach to your work will shine through and be noticed by your superiors. Showing initiative highlights your enthusiasm and commitment to contributing to the organization's success.

Demonstrate adaptability and flexibility in response to changing circumstances or feedback and remain open to mentorship and feedback. You can learn a lot from those who have been doing the job longer. You can also learn from younger or less-experienced workers who might have free ideas about better ways to get the work done. So, also be open to learning new skills, adjusting your approach, and embracing changes within the organization.

If you ever feel that you need additional tools and resources to perform your job well, let your manager know.

  1. The probationary period allows both parties to adjust to the working relationship.

Familiarize yourself with company policies, procedures, and expectations.

Keep the lines of communication open between you and your manager. Let him/her know that you want to do a great job. Ask him/her for feedback on ways that you can do your job better. Use their feedback to think of any changes that you need to make in the way you work to meet performance expectations.

A little after the half-way mark into your probationary period, ask your manager for a copy of the performance evaluation document that they will use to rate your performance when your probationary period ends. Then do a self evaluation of your performance. Make sure to include ratings for all of your key duties. Also rate yourself on how well you follow directions, communicate, exhibit leadership qualities, interact with co-workers, and produce high-quality work. Share your completed self evaluation with your manager and ask them if your self evaluation matches their rating of your performance. And, ask if the two of you can meet to discuss where there are differences.

  1. Your employer knows the labor laws in your area and they will apply them when necessary. In some jurisdictions, labor laws may provide protections for both employers and employees during the probationary period.

Know your state’s or local area’s labor laws. Research if your state is governed by “at-will'' employment laws. Or, if your industry is unionized. Remember also to research workers compensation laws in your job market. It is very unfortunate, but employee’s often do not know the details of their rights and responsibilities in their state. Often, it is only when/if an incident occurs that they then do their research. Unfortunately, it may be too little, too late.

I can all but guarantee you that you will be the first new employee to have followed this strategy. You will gain even more of your manager’s respect and their confidence in your abilities. They will also be so impressed that they will likely be speechless.

IN CONCLUSION:

Navigating the probationary period requires a proactive approach and a focus on demonstrating value to the organization. So, increase your chances of success, by avoiding the common pitfalls such as reporting to work late, excessive absenteeism, inappropriate workplace behavior:

Keep track of your achievements, milestones, and contributions during your probationary period and beyond. Documenting your successes provides tangible evidence of your value to the organization and can support your case for permanent employment.

Thank you once again for joining me on my mission to help you live your best career life. Remember to like, share and subscribe and I look forward to seeing you for the next video. If you want to see the video on why employees get fired during their probationary period, I’ve linked it right here.

Also, if you need a little motivation and positive self-talk, be sure to visit my online store. It’s linked in the description below.

Until next time… Career Success to You!

1
Like
Comment
Share
It's Your Time Believe and Achieve
Bullet point
Follow
4 months ago

Must Read Without Failure!

"Getting promoting ahead of others is not a practice, or a process, it's a principle. As the principle is developed, it becomes a perpetual process to practice." -Edward Alexander

When someone genuinely feels they can trust you, they'll share exclusive information only with you. That's how people grow from "clerk to CEO" in record time.

TRUST...

I Believe You Can...!

#jobsearch #motivation #interview #resume #advice #unemployment #stressful #deliverdriver #hiringnews #aboutmyjob #coverletter #salary #promotion #hired #ageism #faith

3
Like
Comment
Share
Hidden
Donovan McAse
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

I've been working at Aldi's for the past 2 years as a cashier and stocker. I love the place and my coworkers however it's been really slow moving to get promoted here. I noticed that another store has a position open for an Assistant Manager position. So now I'm torn between trying to stay and be promoted at a place I like or jumping ship for a potential promotion at a new store. What would you do in my situation?

#jobsearch #promotion #advice

9
2 Answers
Like
Answer
Share
See all answers
Dana Green
Bullet point
Follow
Top Answer
1 person found this answer helpful

2 years is about the right amount of time at a job to move up to the next level. Don't jump the boat until you know for sure that you won't have to start at the bottom again at another job

2y
1
Reply
1 Marked Helpful
Jake Goodman
Bullet point
Follow

Switchover stores in the same coming is a great idea as you get to reinvent yourself. You get to lose every awkward work moment you had unless it was a documented conversation. You take the best of you and leave the rest behind. Before I owned my own business I used this approach to get the job I wanted and deserved. It also gave my previous manager the opportunity to see the asset that they had lost. I wholly recommend it but don’t be afraid to test the waters.

2y
Mark As Helpful
Reply
Add
Balaji Arya
Community SpecialistBullet point
Follow
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

...assuming that asking for a promotion is a one-and-done discussion. It is usually a series of ongoing conversations. You must be patient!

Instead, the best way to approach asking for a promotion/raise is:

  • Think about the position you want and how it aligns with the objectives of your organization and manager.
  • Prepare a memo that clearly outlines your proven track record and provides concrete metrics on the impact you’ve had.
  • Ask your boss for regular feedback and advice on how you can get to the next level.

Have you ever successfully asked for a promotion? #OntheJob #promotion #BeSmart

28
6 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Katerine Norwood
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

I've been stressed out at work, and trying hard for a solid year to get promotion and my managers have noticed and been keeping an eye on me. But I got into it with someone else. I mean our voices were raised and I used choice words. I did call her stupid so thats on me. She was was nosing in on my call and telling me what I was doing wrong and my numbers are better than hers. I told her her opinion didn't matter and she was stupid and to get off my back. I know other people heard us. I think I blew it. Is there hope?

77
56 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Joshua Gardotti
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

Im a hard worker and Im reliable but they give everyone else promotions and not me. My shift lead said not to go over him now that he's promoted. I always show up and do my job. What do I need to do to get a promotion?

13
13 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Tricia Hendrix
Community SpecialistBullet point
Follow
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

Walmart is a fantastic place to start or grow your career!

Worried you won't progress or earn more $$$?

Good news! They promote over 510 people every day, and 36% of promotions go to first-year associates!

66% of Store Managers began as hourly associates. Plus, if you complete their training program you’ll gain important skills and an opportunity to boost your paycheck.

Get started and apply

#Walmart #jobsearch #cashier #stocker #promotion #careergrowth

3
Like
Comment
Share
Clifton Naylor
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

I work for an Amazon warehouse and it seems like my job is safe, despite the coronavirus thing going on. I think a lot of people are going to be entering the industry because it is a job that is always needed.

If a lot of new people start soon -- do you think now is a good time to ask for a promotion or raise?? I've been here for 4 years....

#coronavirus #warehouselogistics

2
7 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
DeAngelo Lang
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

I wanted to share that I recently got a promotion at work! I was a front desk worker and got promoted to Front Desk Assistant Supervisor this past week. I did it by working really hard and asking my boss for regular feedback on what I can do to improve and what I'm doing well. When the position opened up, I was the FIRST person he went to to offer the role. I'm very happy and excited for this new chapter.

If I can do it, you can do it!!! #motivation #manager #hospitality

77
46 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Fred Goff
CEO and Founder of JobcaseBullet point
Follow
CEO and Founder of Jobcase
over 6 months ago

One of the most productive pieces of career advice I got in my early years out of college was my first manager telling me to always dress for and act for the next role I want, so that when opp opens up I am a natural to be considered. That worked in my early banking career quite well.
Nowadays part of my role is to identify new leaders. I don't really look or care about attire (Sorry Mr. Phinney, that worked in 20th-century banking but not in tech today). Rather, among people who are driving results in their current responsibilities, I strive to identify those that also are cognitive and self-aware and authentic and who carry the values of the company mission and culture (and I also confess to appreciating presence of a sense of humor, good or bad- more on importance of that in another post). Many people who possess these characteristics do so naturally, but each of these can be learned and applied as well. If you are looking for growing responsibility in your own situation I'd encourage you to consider these dimensions.
I would also encourage thinking about a simple question: how can you better help your Boss succeed? (Let's presume you are in a normal situation and your Boss has good character and his/her success is consistent with your organization's success). Pause to think about what they need to deliver, what burdens& constraints they have in their way and think about how you can crush your job in a rhythm that is in great harmony with their agenda and constraints and pressures. In truth - they should be spending most of their time thinking about what they can do to help increase the odds of YOUR success. But if you pause to think about theirs, this just might make all the difference. I don't mean brown-nose (is that still an acceptable term to use or am I showing my midwest GenX roots by using that? - well, no offense intended if so). A good Boss won't respect or reward that. I mean: acknowledge your Boss has pressures, and if you can help relieve these, or even acknowledge them in supportive processes then you will likely be recognized with greater appreciation. Here's a trick to get in rhythm. Are you ready for it? Ask! Its that simple. Just Ask. For example: "I have a small problem I need help resolving - is this a good time for something like that or should I wait to address it"; or "I have a big process change I think can improve things, is this a good time or should I schedule later to address it". etc. Most all Boss's want to be great at their jobs. Most all Boss's are good. Almost NO Boss's are always good or always great. Often that's because of mindshare and timing. Simply asking about timing can be the start of getting in sycnh. And by doing so - you are actually creating the space for your Boss to be better at their job. And proving you can help other people succeed in their roles, even your own Boss, while you are succeeding in yours is a great thing to get noticed for - and get promoted for! Look, producing results in your current role is table stakes. Yes, it should be appreciated. Yes, it should be rewarded. But let's face it, its what you are getting paid to do. If you want to get noticed to get to that next level, you have to operate on a next-level. Deliver extra-ordinary results. Or show you have the capacity for that. But also consider the rhythm and attributes that demonstrate that next level thinking that shows you will continue to deliver extraordinary results in that next level up position as well. Then you'll find the promotions coming to you faster than you can ask for them. Cuz Boss's love to find capable people to help them keep moving results forward in harmony. And they appreciate people that make their jobs easier and help them be better at it.

These are just some musings that I wanted to share that were prompted by this Fast Company article. Maybe you like their tips better. Maybe you can find a mentor to give you more relevant counsel. Thats great. This early morning stream of conscious writing about promotions may not be right fit for your situaiton. thats ok. The important thing is to be thinking about that next role. If you made it this far in the reading then you are. Congrats. just thinking about your next career step is already a differentiator. Taking actions to get that next career step is next differentiator. I know Jobcasers will be here to help you on either front. And I hope you help other Jobcasers too! Good luck. Onwards & upwards... #StrongerTogether https://www.fastcompany.com/90466587/want-a-promotion-these-4-habits-are-more-powerful-than-talent #promotion

7
4 Comments
Like
Comment
Share