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Cynthia Okonkwo
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3 months ago

https://studio.youtube.com/video/pDvHvzM_sUQ/edit

#Career Success, #Recruitment, #Candidate Pool, #Onboarding, #First Day, #Training, #Workplace Culture, #Company Culture, #Professional Development, #Behavior, #Performance, #Duties, #Responsibilities, #Knowledge, #Skills, #Abilities, #Competencies, #Professional Development, #Promotion, #Collaboration, #Diversity, #Equity, #Inclusion, #Work-Life Balance, #Benefits, #Total Rewards, #Perks, #Employee Relations, #Equality, #Retirement, #Conflict Resolution, #Interpersonal Relationships, #Relationship Building, #Service, #Authority, #Respect, #Compliance, #Fair Treatment, #Protected Categories, #Legal Protections

Title: Don’t Get Fired! Thrive in Your Probationary Period

Greetings everyone! Welcome to my channel. Thanks for joining me for another video. You know that I’m on a mission to help you live your best career life and I’m doing so one video at a time. So, if you like the information that I bring to you, click the “thumbs-up” to let YouTube know that you want more information like this to come your way. Also, please share my videos with others who want to level up their career life. Finally, I would love for you to subscribe so that you get notified each time I release a new video.

Introduction:

Probationary, Provisional, Introductory, Orientation, Training, Initiation period, etc. They all refer to the first months to 1 year trial period after you start your new job. It's that crucial phase that determines your future with the company. It’s because you and your new employer use that time to decide if the two of you are a good fit for each other. While probationary periods vary in length of time and specific requirements, the goal remains the same for you, the employee: to secure your position and transition into a permanent role. If there’s such a thing these days.

We all know that starting a new job can be an exciting and nerve-wracking experience all at once. A while back, I did a video on three reasons why employees get fired during their probationary period. So, this video is a follow-up of sorts to that one, but I’m turning the tables today and sharing some proactive steps that you can take to increase your chances of achieving a successful probationary period with your employer.

Understand Your New Employer’s Probationary Period Strategy and Develop Your Own:

Most people still consider the probationary period as the initial months of the employer:employee relationship when employers evaluate new employees. The reality is that it is also the time for employees to evaluate their new employer. So below, I am sharing with you the ways that your new employer will assess your fit for the company. I am also sharing with you the corresponding strategy that you, as the new employee, should implement to successfully navigate the probationary period.

  1. Know that the first starting point of your new employer’s strategy is to assess if you have the necessary skills, knowledge, and cultural fit to be successful as an employee of the organization.

So, as the “new kid on the block,” you should ask your manager for a copy of your job description on your first day of work. Also, ask your manager how they define success on the job.

Take advantage of professional development opportunities offered by the company. Whether it's attending training sessions, workshops, or industry conferences, investing in your professional development demonstrates your commitment to continuous learning and growth. Even if your company’s budget is limited, take advantage of free and low-cost online personal and professional development opportunities through sites like Udemy, Teachable, Coursera, and others.

Exercise resilience, especially in the face of challenges or setbacks. Demonstrating resilience in overcoming obstacles showcases your ability to adapt and thrive in the face of a changing work environment.

Maintain a positive attitude and do not participate in workplace gossip. Your ability to maintain a high level of professionalism in your conduct, interactions, and work ethic will reflect positively on your character and commitment to the role.

Do your best to complete your assignments as requested and in a timely manner. If you can’t meet a deadline, ask your manager for a deadline extension.

Don’t be afraid to ask questions when you are not sure how to complete an assignment. Also, ask for a copy of your company’s employee handbook and read it from front to back to familiarize yourself with the company’s policies. Finally ask for a copy of the standard operating procedures for your position and department and follow them 100% when doing your work.

If you are ever unsure about a task, policy, or expectation, seek clarification from your manager or an authorized co-worker for guidance or clarification. It's better to ask questions and seek clarity than to make assumptions that could lead to mistakes or a misunderstanding that could jeopardize your employment.

  1. During the probationary period, your employer will expect you to demonstrate your job-related abilities and meet performance expectations outlined in their job descriptions.

This is why it is so important for you to ask for a copy of your job description. It will contain the exact duties that you will be expected to perform. It is also crucial that you know how your manager will determine your success on the job. So, ask him/her how they determine on-the-job success.

During your probationary period, read your job description as a part of your getting ready for work each day during your probationary period. Think about your performance on the last day that you worked and honestly think how good of a job you did. Identify areas where you may need to improve. Think of ways that you can do a better job and implement those improvements into your work performance the next time you work. Also be ready and willing to take on additional responsibilities when appropriate. This will help you to get better at your job faster.

Your initiative and proactive approach to your work will shine through and be noticed by your superiors. Showing initiative highlights your enthusiasm and commitment to contributing to the organization's success.

Demonstrate adaptability and flexibility in response to changing circumstances or feedback and remain open to mentorship and feedback. You can learn a lot from those who have been doing the job longer. You can also learn from younger or less-experienced workers who might have free ideas about better ways to get the work done. So, also be open to learning new skills, adjusting your approach, and embracing changes within the organization.

If you ever feel that you need additional tools and resources to perform your job well, let your manager know.

  1. The probationary period allows both parties to adjust to the working relationship.

Familiarize yourself with company policies, procedures, and expectations.

Keep the lines of communication open between you and your manager. Let him/her know that you want to do a great job. Ask him/her for feedback on ways that you can do your job better. Use their feedback to think of any changes that you need to make in the way you work to meet performance expectations.

A little after the half-way mark into your probationary period, ask your manager for a copy of the performance evaluation document that they will use to rate your performance when your probationary period ends. Then do a self evaluation of your performance. Make sure to include ratings for all of your key duties. Also rate yourself on how well you follow directions, communicate, exhibit leadership qualities, interact with co-workers, and produce high-quality work. Share your completed self evaluation with your manager and ask them if your self evaluation matches their rating of your performance. And, ask if the two of you can meet to discuss where there are differences.

  1. Your employer knows the labor laws in your area and they will apply them when necessary. In some jurisdictions, labor laws may provide protections for both employers and employees during the probationary period.

Know your state’s or local area’s labor laws. Research if your state is governed by “at-will'' employment laws. Or, if your industry is unionized. Remember also to research workers compensation laws in your job market. It is very unfortunate, but employee’s often do not know the details of their rights and responsibilities in their state. Often, it is only when/if an incident occurs that they then do their research. Unfortunately, it may be too little, too late.

I can all but guarantee you that you will be the first new employee to have followed this strategy. You will gain even more of your manager’s respect and their confidence in your abilities. They will also be so impressed that they will likely be speechless.

IN CONCLUSION:

Navigating the probationary period requires a proactive approach and a focus on demonstrating value to the organization. So, increase your chances of success, by avoiding the common pitfalls such as reporting to work late, excessive absenteeism, inappropriate workplace behavior:

Keep track of your achievements, milestones, and contributions during your probationary period and beyond. Documenting your successes provides tangible evidence of your value to the organization and can support your case for permanent employment.

Thank you once again for joining me on my mission to help you live your best career life. Remember to like, share and subscribe and I look forward to seeing you for the next video. If you want to see the video on why employees get fired during their probationary period, I’ve linked it right here.

Also, if you need a little motivation and positive self-talk, be sure to visit my online store. It’s linked in the description below.

Until next time… Career Success to You!

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Cynde Helke
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over 6 months ago

I lost my position due to a post on LinkedIn. The post stated that I was looking for opportunities. I was a told by my manager that it wasn't appropriate for a supervisor to post something like that and that she was going to take it as my resignation effective immediately. There was nothing I could do. I was asked to pack my things quietly and not speak with anyone. I was followed to my desk, watched while I packed, and escorted from the building by my manager. She then told everyone that I quit.

Is this legal? Who can I speak with? I was there for almost 7 years... Loved my position and was great at it. #termination #management #advice #legal #employeelaw

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Joseph Villagomez
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Injection Molding Supervisor at Process Tech

Supervisors live with a target on their back. You were obviously outed by a coworker or subordinated who was gunning for a way up and you were an obstacle. Sorry.

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Shannon Kiefer
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You definitely need to speak to the Labor board. Also prepare a statement for unemployment in detail as to what happened. You will want to fight for it. Sounds to me like she had it out for you and was threatened in some way. I hope she gets in trouble for lying. I would be interested in what her bosses would have to say is if you told them she lied.

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Phil Berggren
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over 6 months ago

So my employer is in finical trouble, and his actions have caused all but 3 or 4 people to leave. He had his lawyer draw up paperwork saying that I resign my position. If I sign it, I'll get my PTO pay, and a very small severance. If I don't sign it, it will turn into being fired, and I will not get all my PTO pay. Not sure what to do here. #termination #legal #unemployment #wordsofadvice #advice

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Angela Mitchell
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I have a unique ability to find solutions to seemingly irreversible problems.

Have your attorney look over that paperwork before you sign anything

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Alejandro Diaz
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You've earned your PTO pay, your employer has to pay you this whether or not you sign the document.

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Cassandra Gaitor
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over 6 months ago

So I was terminated from my job. The company wanted me to do extra duties and I did. Just not as fast as they thought. So I go on vacation and come back to getting fired. Since then, finding a great job is hard and I'm blessed to find good work. But applying for county jobs and state jobs, with great benefits don't happen.. Can I file for discrimination or can I file a suit against the company for letting me go like that? Also, I interview well and that's it. Rejected! Is there a statute of limitations on filing? Thanks #termination #advice #discrimination #legal

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LaTanya Davis
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Property Management Clerk at People Ready

You should go to human resources and ask why you were let go and explain what was going on

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Crystal Robinson
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Just curious...how long had you been on the job before you took vacation? How many days did you take off?

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rolando velasquez
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over 6 months ago

so this coworker accused me of stealing the master keys to the place today and she started calling management and her bosses spreading lies and telling them that they should fire me and call the police without no evidence whatsoever . Turns out that the keys were misplaced by the janitor himself and were found later on . Can I file a report or press charges on her for defamation of character and falsely accusing me of stealing the keys ? #management #termination #interview #advice #legal #coworkers

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josefina nunez
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over 6 months ago

asistent legal #interview #legal

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Danny McDermott
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over 6 months ago

I was charged with unlawful use of a firearm which was never fired, I went to my CCW classes but I failed to get the background check because of the Coronavirus. was pulled over detain for 48 hours and to avoid this felony after a year which is my first felony I have to go to Diversion class pay $250 in fee 40 of community service, and my gun that I paid $500 for it's going to be destroyed. I don't believe that I think it's going to go on some rookies of there class, #legal

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