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Florence Nkhoma
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Caregiver at Always With Home Care

I have been working as a caregiver for the past 5 yrs

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Don Fellas
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Why CE,

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Cynthia Okonkwo
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over 6 months ago

INTRODUCTION:

As many of us know, all employment relationships do not end well. Maybe your employer mistreated you in some way. Maybe you violated company policy. Or, maybe the employer/employee relationship ended for reasons that might have involved inappropriate actions on both the employer’s and your. Regardless of the reason for your separation, you must move on with your career.

I shared with you in my post, “Three Re-hire Eligibility Categories,” that when your employment ends, your former employer will likely code your file to determine if you are eligible to work for them again. Although you may never want to work for that employer again, beware that, if you are deemed ineligible for rehire, such a determination could interfere with your landing another job. Why? Because your potential new employer could call for a reference and ask your former employer if they would rehire you. If they say, “No,” it could cause you to lose out on the job.

Today, I will share with you the steps that you should take to try and get that determination overturned.

STEPS:

Know What Each Designation Means My current employer assigns one of three re-hire eligibility designations that lets HR know if a former employee can work for the organization again or not. They are Eligible, Conditionally Eligible, and Not Eligible. My post, “Three Re-hire Eligibility Categories,” explains the meaning of each, so check it out.

  1. Understand Why You Were Labeled as Not Eligible for Rehire

When you start a new job, study your employer’s policy. I know that when you start a new job, you’re excited to meet your new colleagues, getting clear on your new manager’s expectations and proving what a great employee you are. So, understandably, leaving is usually one of the furthest thoughts from your mind. However, we are often caught off-guard as employees because we don’t prepare for what could happen. If your former employer is a government or non-profit organization, you may be able to find their policies on-line. If they’re a private employer, you will be less likely to find their policies online.

  1. Research Your Company’s Policy

When you start a new job, study your employer’s policy. I know that when you start a new job, you’re excited to meet your new colleagues, getting clear on your new manager’s expectations and proving what a great employee you are. So, understandably, leaving is usually one of the furthest thoughts from your mind. However, we are often caught off-guard as employees because we don’t prepare for what could happen. If your former employer is a government or non-profit organization, you may be able to find their policies on-line. If they’re a private employer, you will be less likely to find their policies online.

  1. Does Your Former Employer Accept Appeals for Rehire Eligibility Decisions?

Even if your former employer does not have a formal appeal process, write a letter to your former manager and human resources. In your letter, apologize for your alleged inappropriate behavior. Explain what led to that behavior and ask that they reconsider the ineligible for rehire designation. Highlight the contributions that you made to the employer while you were a member of their team. Then ask them for a written response.

  1. Research Your State’s Laws

Taking this step will inform you on what your state’s law requires employers to do when an employee separates from their company. This could include reporting to the state’s department of labor, notice to the employee, and timelines, what information they are allowed to share as a reference. Every state’s laws are different and some may not have a law. Become as informed as you can.

  1. Ask and You May Receive

Contact your former employer’s human resources department and ask for a copy of their rehire eligibility policy and any other policy that addresses the employee separation process.

When all else fails, ask a former colleague who still works for the company to share a copy of their policies on separating employees.

  1. Negotiate

Salary is not the only thing that you can negotiate. Your employer will likely inform you of your rehire eligibility designation during your off-boarding process. If so, try and negotiate a different, less-serious, designation. If you violated a policy, explain that you unknowingly did so. Then offer a sincere apology for your inappropriate behavior. To your surprise, they may reconsider and assign a lower-level designation.

  1. Seek Legal Advice

Some attorneys offer one free consultation, so you may gain useful guidance from that single interaction. Retaining one will have to be a purely personal decision. Keep in mind that this route can be very expensive. Unless you’re an executive who gets a severance agreement, it may not prove cost effective to create another expense if you need to land a new job quickly to survive. The legal process can also be time-consuming and distracting which you don’t need while trying to land or learn a new job. The demand could negatively affect your success on your new job when you land it.

CONCLUSION:

Being labeled as "Not Eligible for Rehire" can be discouraging, but it should not define your future career prospects. Launch your new job search. Not every employer checks references and not every employer asks former jobs about a person’s rehire eligibility. So, be encouraged and know that your next employer is just around the corner if you are persistent. Don’t put all of your hope on one job or employer.

You know that my goal is to help you live your best career life. So, I hope that you found today’s post useful. Wherever you’re watching, please share, subscribe and comment or send me an HR question. If you’re watching on YouTube, please make sure to like my video because it’ll make the algorithm happy and help me to reach more people like you who want to live their best career life.

If you’d like to see more videos like this, or others to help you prepare for your successful job search, visit my site, HR by Nnamtique (HR by Nnamtique Store - HR by Nnamtique). #job #no rehire #hire again #termination #appeal #decision #grievance

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Katerina Garrett
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over 6 months ago

I am a mom of 2 little boys. I reside in New Jersey. I have many years of case management experience with an AS degree in Human Service and currently a returning student majoring in Nursing. I am looking for a permanent remote full time job. I currently work as a contract Disaster Case Manager. Relying on a contract job is not for me. I have a family to feed, school to pay, and to top it off going through a separation. I am such an educated individual with a passion to grow in a company. If there is anyone out their willing to interview me I would greatly appreciate it. I am looking for $28+ per hr with room for growth.

#Student #Nursing #Jobs #RemoteWork #DataEntry #CaseManager #CaseWorker #SupportBroker #CustomerService #Jobs #JobHunting #Hiring #Hire #RemoteJobs #Work #WorkFromHome #Office #OfficeJob #Administration #Cases #Clients #Medical #Management #Disability #Interview

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Bruce Gentry
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over 6 months ago

I,m honest and hardworking.

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Florence Love
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over 6 months ago

Positive Attitude Positive attitude and energy is so important to me. From my work experience ,I found that there's many benefits of having a positive attitude at work. Positive attitude at work can affect everything from morale to profitability. Even the number of sick days that you and your workers experience can be linked to weather your workplace lives on the positive, or the negative. side of the spectrum. #positve #hire

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over 6 months ago

#hire #job Hi anyone looking for side/remote Job that will work a get good pay weekly

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Mikeal Painter
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over 6 months ago

To land a job at #Hire Dynamics I would make sure to...

I had worked fr Hire Dynamics for around 2 1/2 years or so. I had worked at Sans. A Textile plant. Been trying to contact them, but no one returns calls.

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Kimberlyn Johnson
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over 6 months ago

Good place to work.

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Zekiye Aydemir
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over 6 months ago

I am a PostgreSQL and MongoDB database administrator. I did all the installation, configuration, management, performance improvements and backup processes for 4 years. I did SQL and data transfer in projects that were moved from Oracle to Postgresql. I am the only woman in Turkey with a MongoDB DBA certificate. I am learning Kubernetes and terraform, I am interested. I am looking for a remote job where I can improve myself. #jobsearch #remote #interview #workfromhome #mongodb #databaseadmin #dba #postgresql #application #hiring #database #hire #hiringevents

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May delRosario
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over 6 months ago
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Phoebe Montrie
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✨A Bartender Who Loves Helping Others!✨

Hopefully everyone is tested regularly and there is a lot of air flow in there! It can be hard to tell when to wear one these days but I always err on the side of caution! I can see why most wouldn't want to wear one for a hiring event though.

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Joseph Melotik
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The current administration is Not following the science and is giving false hope and risks generating a new variant that jumps the vaccine all to get votes in November

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