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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

Imagine you are a job seeker with a criminal record who has faced repeated rejections due to your past. What steps can you take to overcome these obstacles and convince potential employers to give you a chance?

#chance #today #growth #overcome

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over 6 months ago

Have you ever felt behind in your Career?

Have you ever looked around you and wondered why you are not as successful as your family members or friends? Do you have a habit of comparing your accomplishments to others around you? Do you feel inadequate or less than? Listen to Career Advice video by Linda Raynier to help maneuver through these negative feelings!

#Someencouragement #Advice #PUSH #Career #Growth

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Steven Reitkopf
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over 6 months ago

Find the type of work you enjoy. Look for the most successful companies in that field. Apply for entry level work with the desire to grow within 6 months to a year. Commit yourself to smile, project your interest to learn more, ask a million questions. Ask for what you truly feel you deserve.

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Md Hassan
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over 6 months ago
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Lucio Montes
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over 6 months ago
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Rob ONeil
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Purchasing Manager at East/west hospitality

Well the purchasing manager role is very dynamic. You can really shine or you can really not. You have the ability to impact the gross margin and bottom line for the company you are working for. Perhaps in the the food and beverage area of a hotel especially. There are also a lot of dotted lines between the purchasing manager and all the other managers of departments for your company (especially the director of finance or controller) in my case the hotel.

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Michael Burns
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Sr Materials Purchasing Manager at Lakeland Monroe Group

As a Purchasing manager you will be exposed to many sectors of the business. Engineering, finance, SIOP, shipping and receiving. This will provide you with a well rounded under standing of the integral parts of your organization. You will also learn to negotiate legal contracts to protect your company from lawsuits and provide the best pricing for the products you manage. Additionally, you will hopefully learn to manage a wide range of personalities for your team. Many other things you will learn also.

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Cyril Malinski
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over 6 months ago

How long before I hear back from Vulcan about getting hired

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Laura Thebodeau
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Director Of Operations at E Blast Me

Hi @Amna Zehra - with the right attitude ANY job can help you grow your career.

You'll add skills, knowledge of different industries, maybe be inspired to take a class or two to qualify for other positions.

Also, moving up in the same company is possible.

Best wishes!

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Michael Carvalho
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over 6 months ago

Constructive criticism is a valuable tool for improving your problem-solving skills, but it can also trigger negative emotions and defensive reactions. How can you handle feedback in a constructive way, without letting your ego get in the way? Here are some tips to help you embrace criticism and use it to your advantage.

Acknowledge your emotions

The first step to handle constructive criticism is to acknowledge how you feel about it. Do you feel angry, hurt, embarrassed, or insecure? It's normal to have some emotional reactions, but don't let them cloud your judgment or affect your behavior. Take a deep breath, calm yourself down, and try to detach yourself from the situation. Remember that criticism is not a personal attack, but an opportunity to learn and grow.

Listen actively

The second step is to listen actively to what the feedback giver is saying. Don't interrupt, argue, or justify yourself. Instead, pay attention to the main points, ask clarifying questions, and repeat back what you understood. This shows that you respect the feedback giver, that you are open to their perspective, and that you want to understand their expectations and suggestions

Evaluate the Feedback

The third step is to evaluate the feedback objectively and critically. Not all feedback is equally valid, relevant, or helpful. You need to consider the source, the context, and the purpose of the feedback. Is the feedback giver qualified, experienced, and trustworthy? Is the feedback specific, actionable, and realistic? Is the feedback intended to help you improve, or to put you down? Based on these criteria, you can decide whether to accept, reject, or modify the feedback.

Respond appropriately

The fourth step is to respond appropriately to the feedback. Depending on the situation, you may need to thank the feedback giver, apologize for any mistakes, explain your reasoning, or ask for more guidance. The key is to be respectful, humble, and positive. Avoid being defensive, aggressive, or dismissive. Show that you appreciate the feedback, that you take it seriously, and that you are willing to work on your problem-solving skills.

Implement the Feedback

The fifth step is to implement the feedback in your problem-solving process. This means that you need to take action on the feedback, not just ignore it or forget it. You may need to revise your approach, learn new skills, seek more information, or collaborate with others. The feedback should help you identify your strengths and weaknesses, and guide you towards better solutions and outcomes

Seek More Feedback

The sixth and final step is to seek more feedback regularly and proactively. Don't wait for others to give you feedback, but ask for it yourself. This shows that you are confident, curious, and committed to your problem-solving development. You can also seek feedback from different sources, such as peers, mentors, clients, or online communities. The more feedback you get, the more opportunities you have to improve your problem-solving skills.

#jobsearch #motivation #hiringnews

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