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Scott Silvers
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5 months ago

Imagine you are a job seeker with a criminal record who has faced repeated rejections due to your past. What steps can you take to overcome these obstacles and convince potential employers to give you a chance?

#chance #today #growth #overcome

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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

When I got out of the Army minimum wage was $3.35 per hour, which nearly all factories were paying to start out. Where I was, there was one place, Mansion Mobile Homes, that paid far more: $4.50 per hour plus a weekly bonus, which was usually equal to our 40 hour paycheck. To qualify for the weekly bonus, we couldn’t miss more than seven minutes a week. If you missed more than seven minutes, we lost our bonus for the week and it was split up between the rest of the team members that were getting their bonus. It wasn’t difficult getting hired at Mansion because they had such a high turnover rate, which meant they always needed workers, and they had the high turnover rate because many guys and girls couldn’t keep up with the super fast pace or getting yelled at for not being able to keep up. Easy to get in, but tough to stay in. It was either work for $3.35 an hour or get into Mansion. At my interview I was told I am being hired as a plumber. I told him I didn’t know how to do plumbing, He said, “Well, you’ll either learn it or you won’t work here.” I was pretty nervous my first day and for the first close to two weeks my transition into the manufactured home industry was one of being screamed at, ridiculed, and told daily to hit the time clock and go home because I wasn’t going to make it. The plumbing department was the last station before the home was turned around outside by a tractor driver and then pushed back in the door on the other side on dollies into the sidewall department to continue its journey to completion. For almost two weeks I was outside finishing my work rather than getting it completed in station before the line roll like I was supposed to. My problem was my speed and I was moving as fast as I thought I could every minute of the day. There was no way I was going to not make it. That wasn’t an option. I was already used to not giving up on tasks that I wasn’t sure of, so that disbelief in impossible really guided me through this struggle and I also knew I had overcome much tougher situations in the past. What also helped me overcome this problem is my never responding to their words or the pressure they continuously increased upon me, but instead I kept my mouth shut and fixed my focus on doing the job faster and faster. I realized much later why the rest of my team were so hard on me. They had all been there for four years and longer and they earned one of the top wages in the plant. They knew exactly what it takes to test a man to find out if he is capable of handling his part in a fast-paced, problem filled department. Had it not been for their insulting, judging, and cruel techniques, I would have never become as fast as I did and I would have never kept the job. Regardless of the difference in the jobs I’ve had over the years, the best tip I can give is never give an excuse or blame someone or something else for a mistake you made. You will be respected for it. Never deny it, but instead accept responsibility and always listen to the feedback on how to correct it and then act upon it. And the most important to me: Never talk about a coworker in a negative light behind his or her back. This is also good practice for all areas of our lives. Instead, kindly suggest that you both get that person to join in the discussion. Some will get angry, but they will respect you and know that you won’t talk about them behind their back either. When applying for a job, whether or not you have prior experience, know the job so you can talk about it at the interview, know what’s expected of you, know how to do the job in your mind. Don’t be intimidated or have any doubt about your ability to do the job. I did this by remembering that if one person can do something, I can do it too. I merely have to do it the same way someone with experience does it. One more thing that contributed to my success at this job is before signing off on a home I would look at my work and ask myself, “If this were my home, would it be good enough for me?” #overcome #challenge #perseverance #success

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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

When I got out of the Army minimum wage was $3.35 per hour, which nearly all factories were paying to start out. Where I was, there was one place, Mansion Mobile Homes, that paid far more: $4.50 per hour plus a weekly bonus, which was usually equal to our 40 hour paycheck. To qualify for the weekly bonus, we couldn’t miss more than seven minutes a week. If you missed more than seven minutes, we lost our bonus for the week and it was split up between the rest of the team members that were getting their bonus. It wasn’t difficult getting hired at Mansion because they had such a high turnover rate, which meant they always needed workers, and they had the high turnover rate because many guys and girls couldn’t keep up with the super fast pace or getting yelled at for not being able to keep up. Easy to get in, but tough to stay in. It was either work for $3.35 an hour or get into Mansion. At my interview I was told I am being hired as a plumber. I told him I didn’t know how to do plumbing, He said, “Well, you’ll either learn it or you won’t work here.” I was pretty nervous my first day and for the first close to two weeks my transition into the manufactured home industry was one of being screamed at, ridiculed, and told daily to hit the time clock and go home because I wasn’t going to make it. The plumbing department was the last station before the home was turned around outside by a tractor driver and then pushed back in the door on the other side on dollies into the sidewall department to continue its journey to completion. For almost two weeks I was outside finishing my work rather than getting it completed in station before the line roll like I was supposed to. My problem was my speed and I was moving as fast as I thought I could every minute of the day. There was no way I was going to not make it. That wasn’t an option. I was already used to not giving up on tasks that I wasn’t sure of, so that disbelief in impossible really guided me through this struggle and I also knew I had overcome much tougher situations in the past. What also helped me overcome this problem is my never responding to their words or the pressure they continuously increased upon me, but instead I kept my mouth shut and fixed my focus on doing the job faster and faster. I realized much later why the rest of my team were so hard on me. They had all been there for four years and longer and they earned one of the top wages in the plant. They knew exactly what it takes to test a man to find out if he is capable of handling his part in a fast-paced, problem filled department. Had it not been for their insulting, judging, and cruel techniques, I would have never become as fast as I did and I would have never kept the job. Regardless of the difference in the jobs I’ve had over the years, the best tip I can give is never give an excuse or blame someone or something else for a mistake you made. You will be respected for it. Never deny it, but instead accept responsibility and always listen to the feedback on how to correct it and then act upon it. And the most important to me: Never talk about a coworker in a negative light behind his or her back. This is also good practice for all areas of our lives. Instead, kindly suggest that you both get that person to join in the discussion. Some will get angry, but they will respect you and know that you won’t talk about them behind their back either. When applying for a job, whether or not you have prior experience, know the job so you can talk about it at the interview, know what’s expected of you, know how to do the job in your mind. Don’t be intimidated or have any doubt about your ability to do the job. I did this by remembering that if one person can do something, I can do it too. I merely have to do it the same way someone with experience does it. One more thing that contributed to my success at this job is before signing off on a home I would look at my work and ask myself, “If this were my home, would it be good enough for me?” #overcome #challenge #perseverance #success

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Paul Baker
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Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

This happened to me last year. I started to feel SO overwhelmed about future prospects that I would procrastinate - and then stop looking.

Have you experienced this? And how did you get over it? #jobsearch #OVERCOME

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