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J.T. O'Donnell
over 6 months ago

How To Avoid Agonizing Interview Failure

Years ago, when I first left HR to go to the other side and help job seekers, I worked with a young man with an incredible fear of interviews. Here is his story...

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-i-saved-client-from-agonizing-interview-failure-j-t-o-donnell?trk=mp-reader-card

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Terria McWright Barnea
over 6 months ago

Hey, I got a new job y'all!! ☺️

In the past 2 weeks, I have interviewed with Conduent. I wasn't impressed with the first position's offer (customer care assistant for CVS) but was contacted about the work from home in-bound position. Well after three interviews, I was offered and accepted the position of Tier 1 Support for Apple!! I get to work remotely from home, full benefits, paid training. Praise God!

I am sharing a link for remote positions but they have so many available across the world in various industries!! Of course if it states United States then it's likely available in any state and remotely. Should you have additional questions etc, feel free to contact me! I'll help you the best that I can! Keep striving y'all...it has been a long time coming but doors are finally opening! Be ready to walk on in when they do!! God Bless!! #WorkFromHome #RemoteWorker https://conduent.taleo.net/careersection/conduent_external_portal/jobsearch.ftl

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Jeanine Wilson
27 days ago

Creative Learning to Master Elementary Objectives

Children will learn if it is an interest to them and to make personal connections. There are so many ideas I can share that will make your child want to learn to be Successful! #education #nowhiring #inspiration #tips #tutor #teacher #youcan

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Mark Bryan
over 6 months ago

How early do you arrive for an interview?

I feel like this is an important topic to discuss for interviewing that a lot of people don't think about. In my opinion, the candidate should never arrive more than 15 minutes before their scheduled interview start time unless they are specifically told to do so in order to fill out paperwork.

I feel like if I were to arrive too early it can look like I didn't know when the interview was or the company has to go out of their way to accommodate me, especially if it's a small office.

Are there any other opinions on this?

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Tricia Hendrix
Community Specialist
28 days ago

5 ways to create stronger connections!

Sometimes it can feel very difficult to build genuine relationships with others, especially in the workplace!

How do you do it?!

Find out how with some GREAT tips and tricks for the best ways to establish authentic connections in your career path!

#connections #tips #jobsearch

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Justin Henry
28 days ago

Great podcast about networking

Listen to this podcast about networking. Some really great tips for people looking for their next gig:

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-greenhouse-podcast/id1446940482

#podcast #tips

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Ann L Ogle
over 6 months ago

How to reply: "When did you graduate from high school?"

If this question arises during an interview, politely reply: "Apparently you have a reason for asking, may I ask what it is? It is more tactful that saying: "Why?" and shifts the question back to the employer. Another tip, "Oh, I could obtain a copy of my diploma (transcript, etc) if necessary." There are a lot of tough interview questions you should be ready to answer.

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Jesse Stovall
about 1 month ago
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Teri Wilhelm
over 6 months ago

Remember who the customer is. Excel in empathy. Stay focused on being polite and respectful regardless of how frustrated or angry your customer is. Represent the Delta brand with excellent customer service to retain the customer and turn the negative to a positive. The customer may forget what you say but they will not forget how you make them feel.

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Nelson Mullins
about 2 months ago

Any one who experience having the first interview then hang or still waiting for the second interview?

Good job on a successful job interview! It’s finally over—you can now breathe a sigh of relief after what felt like years of preparing for it. But what happens next? It’s been over a week and you haven’t heard from the company, even after sending your thank-you letter and first follow-up email. Should you just keep waiting for the company’s phone call? Generally, what you do after the interview is as important as what you do during it. You might either earn or lose the job offer. In this case, you should send a second follow-up email.

When Should You Send a Second Follow-Up Email after an Interview?

You can send your first follow-up email after five business days from the date you were interviewed. However, if they gave you an expected date for feedback yet you haven’t received any, you could follow up after one business day from the expected date. This is to give them ample time to go with their hiring process and for you to avoid sounding frantic. Remember, you’re sending a follow-up email to hear an update and not to pressure them to hire you.

However, if you still haven’t received a response after a week from the date you sent your first email, you can proceed with sending your second follow-up email. Still, make sure not to sound pushy. Employers are after passionate and committed applicants, not desperate ones. So sending it too early is most likely a bad idea. Instead of writing a follow-up email right after the interview, it’s better to send a thank-you email.

Tips in Writing an Effective Second Follow-Up Email

When you compose an email, you need to include parts of a formal email however short and direct, and use the follow-up email format. Plus, make sure that your subject line is striking enough to interest recruiters. Another thing—don’t forget to write the job title you’re applying for and the date you were interviewed to avoid confusion.

Aside from that, here are some more tips on how to write a follow-up email that is guaranteed a response.

Reiterate your interest for the job. After patiently waiting for more than a week, be sure to tell them that you’ve been thinking about the position. Let them know that you’re still excited and enthusiastic about getting the job. However, make sure that you don’t sound arrogant. Write your follow-up in a very polite manner.

Tell them why you’re a good fit for the post. In your second follow-up email, it’s a given that you explain why you would be an asset to the company and a perfect fit for the job. After all, there’s no harm in reminding your interviewer the types of skills you can bring to the table and how you can bring a positive impact. It won’t be a new information, but it’s worth emphasizing.

Show off an accomplishment (if applicable) This isn’t always possible, but in certain situations such as when you forgot to mention qualifications related to the job during the interview or you may have a recent accomplishment happened in between the interview and the waiting period. For example, if you’ve worked in PR and made significant impact to your company’s success, you can tell the story behind it and how you did it. Similarly, you can mention a time such as when you organized an event that went off without a hitch. These stories will add to your credibility and will increase your chances of getting hired.

Ask about the next steps. The most important part of a second follow-up email is to find out the next thing you should do. While reaching out, you cannot speed up the process. The goal is to get information so you are in the loop. Great recruiters will be transparent with you about the process and timeline. They will also let you know if they need additional information from you.

Know when it’s time to quit and not “stalk.” Things get busy and this doesn’t always happen. But if you’ve made follow-ups a few times over the course of a month or two and have since heard nothing, it’s time to back off. Try not to get disheartened–it is part of the reality with job searches. Take your energy and experience and bring them to the next company you’re excited about. Don’t let it stop your job search. #wordsofadvice #application #followup #tips

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Janice Reed

This is all excellent advice, Nelson! I'm so glad you're here to help the community learn more about interviewing. Cant wait to see your next post!

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