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Michael Carvalho
2 days ago

What to look for to determine if a job is a scam While it's uncommon and rare to find scams and fake job opportunities through legitimate job boards, it can sometimes happen. In the event you come across something in your job search that raises your suspicions, here are 10 things to look for to help you determine whether the job you're looking at is genuine or if it's a possible scam:

  1. The recruiter contacts you One warning sign that a job offer may be illegitimate is that the hiring manager or employer makes contact with you first, usually by stating that they found your resume online or through an email. While this trait in itself doesn't necessarily mean a job opportunity is a scam, if you receive a job offer right away, there are unusual requests or there are additional warning signs from this list, it could be a fake meant to obtain your personal information.

  2. You receive a job offer right away Receiving a job offer right away without having applied to an open position, spoken with a hiring manager or participated in an interview can be a huge red flag. An immediate offer to work for an organization combined with the fact that you didn't contact the company first can mean the job opportunity isn't as legitimate as it seems.

  3. The pay is extremely high If you notice that the description mentions an unusually high-income level for the position, it may be a warning sign. For instance, if a job description states the employer will pay an annual salary of $75,000 for only 15 to 20 hours per week for an entry-level role, it could be a sign to look into the company and position further before applying.

  4. The schedule seems too flexible While many career opportunities provide flexible work hours and schedules that promote a healthy work-life balance, if a job appears to be just a little too flexible, it could be another warning sign. Especially combined with unusually high pay, an unconventional schedule can point to something too good to be true.

For example, an opportunity that promises you'll only have to work one or two days per week while still earning an unusually high income should get you investigating further before you send in your resume.

  1. Job requirements and description are vague Real job opportunities have quite specific job details and requirements that you'll always see in a description. However, in illegitimate job offerings, you may notice that the details and requirements are quite vague. For instance, be careful of job offers that only require candidates to be of legal age, be literate, be able to type and other simple and other ambiguous criteria that pretty much anyone could qualify for.

  2. The company requires payment from you Be careful of any company, recruiter or job offer that requires a form of payment from you. No legitimate job opportunity will require you to pay to work for the company. While you should budget any expenses related to your job search—like gas for travel or professional attire—you should never have to pay for an opportunity to interview or accept a job.

  3. The job promises that you'll get wealthy fast If you notice that a job opportunity promises that you'll be able to build wealth quickly or get extremely rich within a month, it's a likely warning sign that the job you're after isn't genuine. Look more into the compensation system of the company, and if you can't find any additional information on the details of the payment schedule, it's best to assume it's a fake and continue on your search.

  4. Communication appears unprofessional Another big warning sign that a job may be illegitimate is unprofessional communication. For example, in a job offer email, look for inconsistencies in grammar, syntax and how the employer or recruiter communicates with you in writing. If it feels more than a little unprofessional, consider researching the position further and find out more about the company.

  5. Contact information for the employer or company is missing In addition to unprofessional communication, many fake job opportunities tend to have missing contact information or vague details about the organization. If you notice the company's information is missing, try an internet search to find a company website or email address. If you still cannot find basic information about the company's location, staff members or other details, you may want to continue onto your next opportunity.

  6. A company requests confidential information before hiring When a company hires new employees, it's usually a requirement to fill out tax documents, submit bank information for direct deposit and other processes that require confidential and personal information. However, this only becomes necessary once you sign an employer's offer and start your new job. If a recruiter or employer asks for any personal information aside from your basic contact information, such as your Social Security number or bank account number, take this as a sign to avoid this company in favor of a real job opportunity.

#Scams #Scam #hiring

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Michael Carvalho
2 days ago

I guess it’s that time again when I feel it is important to remind people in our community to be aware of Employment Scam Posting’s.

I am seeing more Scam Post in our Community. Please Remember when looking for work to never apply for a Job that is offering a Personal Email Address. This is one of the ways they try to obtain your personal information. Before you know it, it will ruin your credit and more.

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N Adams
5 days ago

Hi guys, I just wanted to remind you that there are many scammers out there looking for people who are returning to work, seeking quick income, or in need of urgent cash. Many of the scams look like legit companies and recruiters sending and posting very alluring offers with pay rates like $30+ an hour, to do simple tasks like picking up or collecting packages, inspecting them, and reshipping them.

Many of these scammers claim that they are working for big name company like Amazon, Amex, Target, Walmart, etc., and/or they use legit work from home company names to lure unsuspecting victims in. Often times they make the job sound like it is for a limited time to heighten you need to act on impulse. Then will that you provide personal information (name, address, phone, email, sometimes ss#, and IDs) then demand act quickly because they are waiting for your response to "get in." They also will ask you to click a link, or connect on Zoom, WhatsApp, Telegram, etc. with a code to a specific name. They are clever and their trick really work.

So, my big tip is something all of us have been told or heard before, many times. "If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is." So, do your research. You can use Google and do a reverse search. For example, you can search, "collecting packages and reshipping them scams." Good sites like Snoops and others will immediately spit out a bunch of information. You can also search the name of the sender of the job posting and put it with the job offer, and see what comes up. For example, "Samuel Bush recruiter at ASB company, and shipping packages." Or, search things like, UPS, USPS, Amazon job scams. So don't allow your need for cash to blindside you to the real possibilities of the type of scams that exist online. Think and do your research before you accept that job.

Now, this is not fool proof steps, so do your research on how to avoid being scammed when searching for a job. Again, please think and do your research before accepting that awesome offer. #jobsearch #scams #workfromhome #interview #application

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Yvonne Winston
6 days ago

So I got a job offer from a reputable coming any so I thought. Got offer letter, no red flags red until, was sent an express UPS package with a check for $4950.00, that I was to take a signing bonus of $350.00 and then sent the remainding $4600.00 to a supposed well know place for my working equipment and software! This person was on career builder! Be careful, especially if the company that’s reaching out to you is out of the country! This particular company was called Wavin and they are in the nederlands. Now I’ still don’t have a job, but I still have their check, and the envelopethat ups delivered with an address and name of possibly one of the scammers! #scams be careful y’all

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Steven Ransom
9 days ago

Check Your Sources

If you find a job posting that interests you or if a job offer arrives out of the blue, search the company online and contact them directly to confirm that both the recruiter and the job listing are legitimate. Search the company's name and "scam," then see what comes up.

  • Getting a job offer is exciting, but how do you know the job is legitimate? Employment scams linked to sketchy job offers ensnare an estimated 14 million people each year, according to the Better Business Bureau, resulting in more than $2 billion in losses.

Your new job offer may be a scam if it requires money or personal identifying information up front, seems too good to be true, have you doing suspicious work, or pays you with a fake check.

How could this happen to you? Read on.

#jobsearch #scams

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Sofya Zvereva
16 days ago

I been applying to jobs for a bit now since last year but the thing is more often than not I get people messaging me saying they want to set up an interview via instant messaging which I know is a bullshit way to get private information, they even say to set up stuff at home and they will "reimburse"... year right. I want to find a legit remote job, but kind of hard to do when people are trying to scam left and right #scams #workfromhome

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Mary Cone
16 days ago

Includehealth INC. Scammers are using this legit site to solicit from my indeed. Texting or emailing interviews are NEVER done by this company per their real facebook & website. I spoke with someone from Incudehealth and they verified everything. It truly appeared legit. I went thru a whole long texting interview. Unreal.. #scams

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JoAnne Runyon
20 days ago

I have had to job offers that were money laundering schemes. One with TestArmy the other with Aldevron. Each one of these job offers were both remote positions and had a full job interview as well. Neither of these companies were reported as scams on the internet. One of the job offers froze up my bank account entirely. Be careful when accepting a job offer even if there was a full interview and everything. #jobsearch #remotejobs #advice #scams #wordsofadvice

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Ashley Giorgi
29 days ago

#scams #workfromhome #advice There are more and more scams out there than ever. Many people are finding scams within at home employment. Beware of companies that require your personal accounts whether they be Bank, cash app, Zelle, etc., for training purposes. I personally was hired for Bitcoin exchange manager, and when training was asked for my personal banking account and money apps to practice exchanging actual Bitcoin with the so-called company I was hired with.***** A REAL company that hires for any exchange whether it be Bitcoin,stock, or otherwise will not require your own personal information FOR TRAINING, though it is common to receive your wages through your personal accounts it is not however for training purposes. They will provide training through "mock" accounts, made for training purposes. If your employment involves you putting in your own money or Bitcoin to practice exchanges it is a SCAM.***** (Please excuse grammar as I am using talk to text.)

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Ashley Giorgi
29 days ago

I am seeing a lot of scams for work at home employees and Bitcoin exchange. What scams have you seen while searching? What scams can we avoid while searching for employment? #scam #scams #advice #workfromhome #jobsearch #hiringevents

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