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Bruce Anderson
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over 6 months ago

Worked hard to have a great raport with all inmates, and had some good staff to work with.

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Sandra Polver
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over 6 months ago

Friendly co workers, and working together get things done in kitchen down stairs and up stairs in main kitchen.

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Bourne T
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over 6 months ago

Team work is the best work...

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Howard Pavinyama
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over 6 months ago
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Chester Moore
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over 6 months ago

Communication is the best way to work as a team and get the job done .

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Fred Goff
CEO and Founder of JobcaseBullet point
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CEO and Founder of Jobcase
over 6 months ago

I love our US women’s soccer team. I love the game. I love how dominant USA has been since the 99-ers. And I love this particular team. They are made up of individual talents that are astounding. But their strength comes from teamwork. And is refined by crazy amount of hard work in prep both in field and off. There are a lot of lessons here for all of us. Sport is great metaphor.
But For now I am posting this to remind you to find a tv at 11am EST to watch our champions show what they have worked their entire lives to be able to do. (And given the Netherlands fans might feel similar - it’s going to be an amazing game).

I I believe I believe that I believe that we I believe that we will win ! I believe that we will win !! I believe that we will win !!! #WorldCup. #hardwork #teamwork

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Gage Cherry
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over 6 months ago

Hey Jobcasers,

Today I want to talk about something that's incredibly important to employee engagement and something that I think we all should be looking for in our next employment opportunity. I want to talk about the idea of Stewardship in the context Steven R. Covey discussed it in his book, "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People" and how it's not only important, it's necessary for all of us to maximize our personal and professional development in any role we take on.

To provide context, he explains this idea as a method of management that stifles the urge to micromanage and how it involves setting clear, defined parameters for the task at hand and taking a largely hands-off approach (but still taking the time to get periodic status reports).

He gives an example of having his son take care of the lawn and he explains that he wants the grass to be green and the lawn to be clean (as in free of debris and other foreign objects). He then goes onto say that his son did not keep up with his end of the bargain (about keeping it "Green and Clean") and his son's anxiety over it and how his son eventually asked him to help return the lawn to its original state of "Green and Clean", as well as his son learning the importance of maintaining his responsibilities.

So, you may be wondering: "What does this have to do with me? I'm not in a Management position." or you may be thinking that you can't make your manager entrust you with stewardship over the projects you've been assigned.

That's okay. Not everyone is going to get it and that's not something you can necessarily change, but what you can change is how you approach the tasks you've been given.

Your boss is a micromanager? Take it upon yourself to take ownership of your projects and put a little extra in here and there. I can't guarantee that this will ensure your boss steps back, but here's what I can guarantee, they'll ask themselves whether they should be micromanaging you (who has a history of high performance) or the other employee (who may not have the same history).

You might also be wondering why you should want to take ownership of your projects and the additional responsibility that entails if there's no additional compensation and your boss already trusts you. I can't promise you that there's going to be a financial payoff for the extra work you're putting in or the responsibilities you've taken upon yourself, but I can tell you this: We're all in this boat together.

It's a simple truth. Once you've taken the offer, we're all in the same boat of trying to push our organization's goals further whether our interest in that being our core values aligning with the company's values or perhaps just our own sense of monetary security and we can either take a proactive approach to our workplace and drive it forward or simply coast by day by day. The choice is yours, but just remember that once you sign an offer letter, you join an organization with a highly interdependent infrastructure and the amount of effort you put in may impact people in other departments or even the company's gross revenue or net profits which could have major impact on benefits, bonuses, and even affect layoffs.

So I ask you this, will you step up to plate and take ownership of your department? It doesn't matter if you're the CEO or a line-level employee: You can be the change in your organization that you wish to see or you can be a contributor to the company culture you appreciate. All you have to do is make a pledge to yourself, "We're a team and I won't leave anyone behind."

I hope you're all willing to take that pledge with me and I'd like to thank you all for reading again.

Best Regards,

Gage Cherry

#management #motivation #inspire #teamwork

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Christina Damore
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over 6 months ago

It’s not how well you work, but how well you work with others. Team work makes make the dream work.

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Carolyn Burke
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over 6 months ago

This organization is family oriented the managers and employees foster a good working relationship which is environment friendly it’s like home away from home never had a negative encounter there #teamwork possitivity

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Stephanie K
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over 6 months ago

There are common keywords in just about every job posting that relates to skills such as -

-Communication, multitasking, teamwork, creativity, critical thinking and leadership. These keywords or phrases are called TRANSFERABLE SKILLS that apply in all professions. They are the foundation of all of the professional success you will experience in your current career and the career you may retire in over the years.

-A review of your transferable skills - You may read about communication and think " Yes, I can see how communication skills are important and hallelujah, I have good communication skills". Take time to recall examples of your communication skills and the role they play in the success of your work.

-Same about multitasking skills - You may realize that you need improvement in this area. Whatever you identify a transferable skill that needs work - you have found a professional development project. : IMPROVING THAT SKILL. Your attention to that areas will REPAY you for the rest of your working life, no matter HOW YOU MAKE A LIVING.

7 Transferable Skills -Technical -Communication -Critical Thinking -Multitasking -Teamwork -Creativity -Leadership

These transferable skills are interconnected - For example : Good verbal skills require both listening and critical thinking skills to accurately process incoming information. And you will be able to present your outgoing verbal message to your audience that is understood and accepted.

-Technical Skills - This is crucial in the IT world or anything related to computers BUT tech skills can enhance your stability and help leverage your professional growth by staying current with tech skills of your chosen career path is the keystone to professional stability and growth.

-Communication skills - Verbal Skills - What you say and how you say it Listening skills - Listening to understand rather than waiting your turn to talk Writing skills - Clear written communication, essential for success in any career. It creates a lasting impression of who you are

-Critical Thinking Skills - Are the professional world application of all of the problem-solving skills you've been developing since grade school. Analytical or problem-solving skills allow professionals to logically think through and clearly to examine the problem, ask the critical questions, look through the factors affecting the solution and decide which solution is to keep and which to disregard. Bosses love it when employees present them a solution with the problem

-Multitasking - I've discovered that this is the most desired skill of this generation. My job requires multitasking and it is based on 3 things - Being organized, establish your priorities and managing your time. This keeps you informed about what you have achieved.

-Teamwork Skills - Teamwork asks that a commitment to the team and it's success comes first. This means you take on a task because it needs to be done, not because it makes you look good. This skill is especially important if you intend to be in a leadership role. I always look for candidates who are in management roles that are capable of understanding the critical dynamics of teamwork. So if you want or intend to be a leader- learn to be a teamplayer.

-Creativity Skills - This skill comes from the frame of reference you have for your work, professional and industry. There's a big difference between creativity and having ideas. Ideas IMO are like headaches - We all get them once in a while. Creativity is the ability to develop those ideas wit the strategic and tactical know how to bring them to life. This skills also demands that you harness other transferable skills to bring these ideas to life. From my experience - creativity springs from my critical thinking, multitasking, communication, teamwork and leadership.

-Leadership Skills - When your team believes in your competence, and that you have everyone's success as your goal - they will follow you. You accept responsibility but they get the credit. When your actions INSPIRE others to think more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are on your way to becoming a leader.

Your job as a leader is to make your team function, so your teamwork skills give you the smarts to pull your team together to work in a cohesive unit. Your technical , critical thinking and creativity skills help you correctly define challenges your team faces and gives you the wisdom to guide them toward solutions. Your creativity enables you to come up with solutions that others may not have seen. Your multitasking skills will allow you to create a practical blueprint for success that will help your team take ownership of the task and deliver results - ON TIME.

From my experience - leadership is a combination and outgrowth of all transferable skills plus the clear presence of all professional values. Leaders aren't born - they are self-made. And just like anything else, it takes HARD WORK.

So, remember to:

-Develop these skills -Make them a living dimension of your professional brand -Understand how each enables you to do every aspect of your job just a bit better -Reference them subtly in your resume and other written communications ( cover letter) -Reference them appropriately in your meetings/interviews with employers as underlying skills that will enable you to do your work well.

Most important - when these skills become a part of you, they will being greater success to everything you do.

Happy Hunting in the New Year. May it bring you everything you want. So. Go. And. Get. That. Damn.Job.!

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