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Elyssa Duncan
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over 6 months ago

We know the job search process is tough… how can we help??

We want to know what YOU need!

Comment below and let us know what your struggles are while job searching.

  • What are your barriers to landing a job?
  • What do you want to learn more about?
  • What resources do you need?

You ask the questions, we'll find the answers!!

#askus #interview #firstjob #teens #jobcasetips

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Mike Grauer Jr
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over 6 months ago

I am a proponent for on the job training such as apprenticeships, internships and similar opportunities. Instead of sending young adults off to an expensive college for a degree that may not be in demand when they get out.

Lets start a list of companies and organisations that have this option.

#employment #college #education #jobs #job #youngadults #internships #apprenticeships #OnTheJobTraining #training #edu #teens

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Maya Smith
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over 6 months ago

On Saturday, September 15th, from 10 AM - 2 PM, BCYF's Division of Youth Engagement & Employment is hosting READY, SET, SUCCESS at the Tobin Community Center at 1483 Tremont St!!

Please join us at this free youth development event to ensure that young Bostonians, ages 15-25, are ready for all of the success coming their way! You can pre-register for the event here: https://goo.gl/forms/8kwcehV0nZy0ivoA2

At READY, SET, SUCCESS you will receive:

Free Professional Headshots by Jobcase | Free Professional Clothing | Free Food | Free Hair & Hygiene Products | Free Resume Support | Free Giveaways | & MORE

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Matt Greenwood
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over 6 months ago

I am 16 and just got my first job working at pizza hut. Its good for now plus I get discounts on pizza so that's cool. If you want to get a job too make a resume. Don;t know how? Google resume templates teen and use some of the ideas to help make yours. It's really easy. Then drop it off at the job u want. You HAVE to go in! Ask for the manager and act happy while you tell them who u are, and then hand them your resume. Trust me it works! Call back in a few days to check in with them. If you don’t do anything then it won’t happen.

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Maddie A
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over 6 months ago

#teensummerjobs #internships #teenjobs #jobsearch #advice #teens #highschool

Don’t dismiss the idea of high school internships until you’ve got the facts.

First, let’s bust a few myths:

  1. Internships aren’t just for recent grads and college students
  2. Not all of them are unpaid
  3. It’s not just getting coffee, making copies, and being the office errand-runner

Now that we’ve cleared that up, keep in mind that timing is everything. March and April are prime application time for summer internships.! Read on for facts, tips and resources to help you decide if an internship is right for you, and how to get started.

Types of internships The best internship options for high schoolers are: paid, unpaid, for-credit and not-for-credit. Though each one varies, they’re similar in that they all help with early stage career-building, look great on college applications, help you make industry connections, are a chance to lock down high-level references and referrals, and ultimately, can lead to a permanent job.

Paid: Don’t expect to be rolling in dough, but do expect to be rich with experience. • US Secret ServiceGeoSciences Bridge ProgramMicrosoftGoogle

Unpaid: Same idea as a paid internship, but make sure you are getting a fair payoff of exposure, learning, and networking opportunities. • Harvard Summer Program for High School StudentsStanford University Research ProgramWedding & Event PlanningEnvironmental Protection Agency

For-Credit: Many high schools and colleges offer internship programs in exchange for school credit. The idea is to help you work toward graduation, and once you have your degree, you’ll have that much more experience in your field! Many of these internships can also be done for non-credit. Not-For-Credit internships are usually for students who do not need any additional credit on their transcripts, but want more practical experience. (Note: these are traditionally for college-bound students or college students, but you can still keep an eye out to see if they can be obtained while in high school) • EngineeringTechnical InternCreative ServicesDigital MediaLegal Justice

Benefits We already busted the myth that interns live to serve coffee, run errands and make copies. What you can expect is behind-the-scenes access to action that’s usually reserved for seasoned professionals. It’s a great way to “try on” an industry, business, or career before taking the plunge for real.

Some more benefits of internships: • Work experience trumps any and all coursework or volunteering...it’s a great resume booster. • Automatic references and referrals • Network connections and contacts • RELEVANT WORK EXPERIENCE! A student internship is a rare opportunity to obtain actual work credit, which will make you stand out against other high schoolers with no work experience and increase your chances of landing a job.

SIDE NOTE: This kind of “career exploration” isn’t exclusive to only students who plan to go to college. Apprenticeships are a great way for vocational school students or trade workers to gain practical hands-on experience and training in a specialized field.

Resources Now that you know the types of internships and how they’re beneficial, here’s some info compiled to help you find – and land – your 2018 summer internship. • 15 Awesome Internships for High School StudentsSummer 2018 Internships Search6 Reasons To Do An InternshipCareer Advice: Why Internships Rock15 Ways to Stand Out As An InternNASA Internships

AND, don’t miss these tips straight from the Jobcase Jobready Kit to help you get in tip-top internship shape: • How to use the Jobcase resume generatorJobcase Jobready ChecklistThe small stuff matters! How & why you should add it to your Jobcase profile

High school is not too early to start thinking ahead, and an internship is just that: an investment or in your future.

So, overall, think of an internship as a unique chance to “test drive” and explore an interest. No contracts signed, no long-term commitments. It’s less about making money and more about getting hands on, in your face, real-world experience.

What are some reasons you would consider an internship? What kind of internship interests you, and why?

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Maddie A
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over 6 months ago

#teensummerjobs

It’s a common (and a good!) question, and it’s best to know the answer before tax day–April 15–rolls around.

The short answer It’s not a question of how old you are, it’s a question of how much you make.

The long answer If you are a minor (under 18 years old) and your earned income was over $6,350 in 2017, you will need to file a tax return.

In the world of taxes, minors are (under 18 years old), considered “dependents” and are in a lower tax bracket than adults. The reason is quite simple: minors are likely students and are therefore not expected to make as much money as their parents or guardians.

Am I a “dependent?” If you are one of the following, you are considered a “dependent” by the IRS (Internal Revenue Service): • Under 19 years old • A full-time student under 24 years old • Your parent or guardian provides financial support that is equal to or greater than half of your annual income.

“Unofficial” jobs count! Babysitting, lawn mowing, dog walking, snow shoveling...if you’ve filled one of these roles or any similar roles, you’re considered “self-employed” by the IRS. And if you made more than $6,350 as a self-employed worker in 2017, you’ll need to file.

I need to file. Now what? Time to fill out forms. Yay!

First of all, memorize your social security number...all of these forms will require it.

If you are self-employed, you'll fill out Form 1040EZ and Schedule SE (self-employment). If you’re employed by a business, your employer will provide you with a W-2 form. • More info on Form 1040EZ here • More info on Schedule SE self-employment here

If you’re not likely to make more than $6,350 working this summer (or even this year in total), consider filling out a W-4 form anyway (more info on the W-4 form here). W-4s determine how much of your income employers will withhold from your paycheck. If you don’t fill it out, they are required to withhold at the highest rate, so completing the form will will ensure you keep as much of your earnings as legally possible. (More info on filling out a W-4 as a minor here.)

Resources Visit these pages for more helpful information. • How to File as a DependentTax Rules for Children and DependentsMinimum Income Requirements for Filing a Tax ReturnHow Many Hours is “Full-Time” Employment?How to File ElectronicallyHelpful Government Resources

Too long, didn’t read Long story short: stay on top of this stuff! Get all your ducks in a row before April 15. Tally up your earned income for 2017 and determine if you need to file, and if you do, refer to the information and resources above to ensure you do so correctly.

If you need additional help, consider visiting your school’s guidance department–they can give you more detailed guidance and help answer any specific questions you may have.

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Ashley Wilson
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over 6 months ago

Tell me about yourself. This question makes us cringe a little bit, but every employer will ask you this in some form during an interview. Why? Well because they want to see what YOU bring to their company. You might be wondering (or tempted) to tell your life story and be more personal, but don’t! When an interviewer says, "Tell me about yourself," what he or she really wants to know is how your experience applies to the job you're interviewing for.

Stick to talking about what it is you do or have done as it relates to the job. You can think about some past experiences that are relevant to the job you’re applying for, and select 3 or so strengths you possess which you feel are important to this job. This could be experiences, traits, skills, etc. This will help you let the interviewer know more about yourself, but also cleverly state why you are a good fit for the role. Selling yourself is key, so always be thinking in the back of your mind, “Would I hire myself?” Let’s take a look at an example:

Interviewer: Ok Joe, can you tell me more about yourself?

Joe: I have been working as a stocker for Target for over 2 years. My most recent experience has been writing and keeping track of inventory orders on our database systems. One reason I particularly enjoyed my position were the challenges that went along with it such as anticipating inventory needs. I also loved that I was able to use my organizational skills daily whether it was through taking inventory or rotating stock.

Next, mention your strengths and abilities: Joe: My real strength is achieving goals. I pride myself on following through, maintaining company standards, and meeting deadlines. When I commit to doing something, I make sure it gets done, and on time.

Conclude with a statement about your current situation: Joe: What I am looking for now is a company that values commitment, offers a strong team and a place where my work efforts are valued"

Before you head into the interview PLAN what you are going to say. This little speech is called your elevator pitch. Once you have written it down, practice it at home with family, in front of the mirror, or even consider recording yourself. Get comfortable speaking about yourself and why you are a great fit for the company and your confidence will shine through!

Check out [this video] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kayOhGRcNt4) for some more tips on how to successfully tell employers about yourself.

Good luck! : )

#elevatorpitch #interview #jobsearch #tips #teensummerjobs #teenjobs #teens

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Ashley Wilson
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over 6 months ago

When I was fourteen I remember that teenage longing for my own money. The kind that you didn’t need to borrow from your cousin, or have to ask your parents for. It was just yours because you had earned it. There was no online job seeking when I was an early teen because well, there was no internet, so I went door to door raking my neighbor’s lawns for a small fee. It’s hard to imagine those days now, but they did exist and the world of job seeking has changed so rapidly and continues to do so every day.

I was fortunate yesterday to have the opportunity to partner with the Red Sox Foundation where a few of my co-workers and I were able to assist their teenage scholar program participants. We helped many teens write their first resumes, edit existing ones, and reviewed job-seeking tips together. We even helped them pinpoint some ideas of what exactly they want to do in their future careers.

It’s surprising to see teens as young as fourteen with resumes, as I did not have one until I was in college and immersed in the “real world,” but yet here they are ready to face it head-on at such a young age. I was thrilled to be there yesterday giving back and offering advice to those about to begin their journies. To see so much passion, tenacity, and drive in their eyes makes me hopeful for the future.

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Maddie A
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over 6 months ago

#teensummerjobs #teenjobs #teens #jobsearch #tips #summerjobs #references

Friday’s #teensummerjobs post was about how to make sure you have all the info you need to start applying for summer jobs – catch up here.

If you’re looking for work this summer, you’re probably going to be asked to supply a few references.

A reference is someone who knows your personality, your strengths, and your weaknesses. It could be someone you worked for or worked with, your big brother/big sister mentor (or mentee), your math teacher, coach, teammates or a violin instructor...you get the idea. Basically, references are people who know YOU.

Keep your references as professional as possible, though: don’t use your next-door neighbor (unless you’ve helped them out before, maybe with babysitting or dog walking), your best friend’s mom, or your cousin’s friend’s roommate's brother’s girlfriend.

So, who should (and shouldn’t) you list as a reference?

Good References: • Teachers and tutors • Anyone who oversaw or worked with you in a volunteering program • Group members (from a school project, for example, but only if the outcome was great!) • Advisors or counselors • Former or current supervisors or coworkers

Not-So-Good References: • Family (parents, brothers, sisters, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc.) • Friends (BFFs included) • People you haven’t worked or interacted with before

Before you use someone as a reference, reach out to each one and ask if they're okay with you listing them. Once you have their permission, get their contact info (phone number and email) and make sure they are okay with being contacted. This is a great way to give them a heads up and time to think about all the glowing things to say about you.

Jobcasers who have “been there, done that” have a lot of good advice and expertise to offer about references. Check out what they’re saying: • TimEmilyJulie

As always, chime into the discussion! Jobcasers make the case for Jobcase.

Keep a look out for more #teensummerjobs updates throughout the month.

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Maddie A
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over 6 months ago

This is the second piece in our #teensummerjobs series – yesterday we looked at why it’s important to start the summer job search early. Check it out.

If you’re a teen and planning on working this summer, don’t just firehose out job applications! Every company has different requirements, so it’s important to make sure you have the information needed to fill out the application and that it ends up in the right place.

Be prepared! Here’s a checklist: • Do you need to provide a resume? • Does the company ask for references? • Can you apply online, or do you need to apply in-person? • Know your availability: number of hours/week, what days of the week, and whether or not you can work mornings, afternoons, and nights • If you’re under 18, click here to read up on working-age requirements by state.

Most companies use online applications, but there are quite a few that require you to apply in-person, in-store. The Home Depot requires you to apply in-store at a career center kiosk. But The Gap’s application process is completely online, as is Starbucks’ for barista positions. Nannying and babysitting jobs are usually online, too.

The bottom line: whatever position you’re trying to land, get all your ducks in a row and research what’s required before applying. All it takes is a quick company search to ensure you’re on the right track and that your application will land in the right place.

And then, once you know what’s required, by all means, crank that application-firehouse.

Monday’s #teensummerjobs post will be all about who you should (and shouldn’t) list as a job reference on your applications – make sure to check it out!

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