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Maya Smith
over 6 months ago

Free Career Development Event with DYEE on September 15: Ready, Set, Success!

On Saturday, September 15th, from 10 AM - 2 PM, BCYF's Division of Youth Engagement & Employment is hosting READY, SET, SUCCESS at the Tobin Community Center at 1483 Tremont St!!

Please join us at this free youth development event to ensure that young Bostonians, ages 15-25, are ready for all of the success coming their way! You can pre-register for the event here: https://goo.gl/forms/8kwcehV0nZy0ivoA2

At READY, SET, SUCCESS you will receive:

Free Professional Headshots by Jobcase | Free Professional Clothing | Free Food | Free Hair & Hygiene Products | Free Resume Support | Free Giveaways | & MORE

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Lawrence White
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

The push for the 2021 Summer Jobs season is on now!

Marquette County, MI - The Michigan DNR Parks and Recreation Division just announced plans to hire up to 1,200 seasonal park workers and more than 50 seasonal park rangers to help deliver memory-making outdoor experiences at state parks, state forest campgrounds, harbors and other DNR-managed recreation facilities throughout spring, summer and fall.

Workers earn between $10 and $11.60 an hour and may qualify for academic/internship credit. Park rangers receive state employment benefits and are paid between $17.75 and $24.95 an hour. - DNR Parks and Recreation Division Careers

To learn more about these opportunities and other openings throughout the department go to https://www.michigan.gov

Are you a teen or minor workers looking for summer employment with no previous work experience? Check out Teens: land a job by creating a resume! and No experience? You can still land a job right now! for quick tips and suggestions designed to help you get hired!

#2021Summerjobs #teens #seasonal #fulltime #parttime #park&recreation #Michigan #MidWest

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Lawrence White
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

Six Flags is Hiring for 2021 Season!

Illinois - Six Flags parks in Illinois just announced their hiring initiative for #2021SummerJobs. Application are now being accepted for Ride Operators, Food & Beverage, Aquatics, Security, Customer Service, and more!

Six Flags parks are now being accepted for the 2021 Season. Apply online today!

Teen Application Tips - Teens: land a job by creating a resume!

https://www.sixflags.com

#2021SummerJobs #sixflags #teens #amusement #entertainment #hospitality #hiringnews #jobsearch #fulltime #parttime #Illinois #MidWest

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Ashley Wilson
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

Do you remember this?

When I was fourteen I remember that teenage longing for my own money. The kind that you didn’t need to borrow from your cousin, or have to ask your parents for. It was just yours because you had earned it. There was no online job seeking when I was an early teen because well, there was no internet, so I went door to door raking my neighbor’s lawns for a small fee. It’s hard to imagine those days now, but they did exist and the world of job seeking has changed so rapidly and continues to do so every day.

I was fortunate yesterday to have the opportunity to partner with the Red Sox Foundation where a few of my co-workers and I were able to assist their teenage scholar program participants. We helped many teens write their first resumes, edit existing ones, and reviewed job-seeking tips together. We even helped them pinpoint some ideas of what exactly they want to do in their future careers.

It’s surprising to see teens as young as fourteen with resumes, as I did not have one until I was in college and immersed in the “real world,” but yet here they are ready to face it head-on at such a young age. I was thrilled to be there yesterday giving back and offering advice to those about to begin their journies. To see so much passion, tenacity, and drive in their eyes makes me hopeful for the future.

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Maddie A
over 6 months ago

TEENS: Before You Apply, Make Sure You Comply

This is the second piece in our #teensummerjobs series – yesterday we looked at why it’s important to start the summer job search early. Check it out.

If you’re a teen and planning on working this summer, don’t just firehose out job applications! Every company has different requirements, so it’s important to make sure you have the information needed to fill out the application and that it ends up in the right place.

Be prepared! Here’s a checklist: • Do you need to provide a resume? • Does the company ask for references? • Can you apply online, or do you need to apply in-person? • Know your availability: number of hours/week, what days of the week, and whether or not you can work mornings, afternoons, and nights • If you’re under 18, click here to read up on working-age requirements by state.

Most companies use online applications, but there are quite a few that require you to apply in-person, in-store. The Home Depot requires you to apply in-store at a career center kiosk. But The Gap’s application process is completely online, as is Starbucks’ for barista positions. Nannying and babysitting jobs are usually online, too.

The bottom line: whatever position you’re trying to land, get all your ducks in a row and research what’s required before applying. All it takes is a quick company search to ensure you’re on the right track and that your application will land in the right place.

And then, once you know what’s required, by all means, crank that application-firehouse.

Monday’s #teensummerjobs post will be all about who you should (and shouldn’t) list as a job reference on your applications – make sure to check it out!

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Amelia Danoff
over 6 months ago

Great Job Opportunity for Teens (and Preteens)!!

Even if you are a preteen as young as 12 years old, you can find job opportunities to be mother's helper. If the mother is working at home or doing other chores, you will be able to supervise and entertain the kids so the mother can have time to herself to do her work. At the same time, you will be training to become a real babysitter and gaining good experience while also making some money. At 14, you can get certified to become a real babysitter, and I would recommend working for one of your neighbors who has younger children so that you don't even need to drive to their house and you can just walk to work! "Remember to check for allergies and ask the parents what their preferred bedtime is for their children!" -Ally (16, current babysitter) https://www.care.com/c/stories/2821/how-to-get-a-teen-babysitting-job/ https://www.care.com/c/stories/6929/what-is-a-mothers-helper/

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Anthony L
over 6 months ago

Job Hunting Trouble?

Hi, I’m deaf (using cochlear implants) and 18 years old (going 19 this year) with only a high school diploma. Its been hard for me to find a suitable job for a deaf person like me, does anyone have any job suggestions?

Strengths:

  • Artistic talent
  • Physically very fit
  • Cooperative and will try to pay attention as best as I can

Weaknesses:

  • Deaf (I can hear almost like a normal Hearing person, it is just that communications have to be extremely clear and it depends on phone,telecommunications, etc. if they are reliable or not) #teenjobs #teens
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Dan Sauber

I'm agreeing w/Judy Allness. At my last IT job 2 project managers had CIs. Most communication in Information Technology is written(eMail, status reports, etc); your written English is excellent. Also, there's a need for ppl in HVAC and electrical trades; some trades schools have pgms that pay while you train. (I wonder if NYSD has help for non-students https://www.nysd.net/).

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Cliff Aronson

Also doing information technology work can be a good area to go into. I would recommend knowing C++ and Java as the top 2 computer programming languages to know.

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Priscilla Delacerda
over 6 months ago
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AJ Ehnert

McDonald’s

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Ameer Hamza

KFC

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Ashley Wilson
Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

Are YOU prepared for a babysitting job?

If you’re under18, this job is ideal especially if you love interacting with children and you're looking for to add experience to your first resume. It’s important however to ensure you stay safe and feel prepared as you search for babysitting jobs. So let’s go over some do’s and don’ts and help you find a babysitting job to apply to!

DO'S

-Search and apply for babysitting jobs by clicking [here on Jobcase] (https://www.jobcase.com/jobs/search). Type in your location, the words “child care” or “babysitting” in the Job Title box, and hit that search button! Apply to any you are interested in.

-Have a parent help you search and also check out the job first before you reach out to any potential employers.

-Take a babysitting class that includes CPR. You can add this to your resume and it will help employers to trust you with their child. Emergencies can happen so it's good to be prepared! Here are some other helpful things you can do to help you [prep] (https://www.wikihow.com/Prepare-for-a-Babysitting-Job) for the job.

-Consider signing up for [Care.com] (https://www.care.com/). This site allows to to make your own parent monitored account which will help keep you safe. You can also create a profile for each type of job that you are interested in addition to babysitting, such as pet care or tutoring.

-Always have an in person interview at a public place such as a coffee shop or library. Make sure to bring an adult with you or notify them of where you will be meeting the employer. Ask to see an ID so you can confirm the person you are meeting with is legit!

DON’TS

-Avoid replying to any text messages, emails or phone calls from a potential employer who requests that you cash a check, send a money card, purchase an item, or wire money for them. Also NEVER accept money from an employer you haven't worked for or met in person yet! This is a scam.

-Never give out your personal information such as social security number, address, etc.

-Don’t trust a potential employer that asks you to send money for the “needs” of the job. They might reach out with a job offer that seems too good to be true. Once you reply, the scammer may ask you to buy a needed item (like a toy or wheelchair for their child) or claim they're relocating and want to pay you in advance. AVOID these scam conversations entirely and move onto a real opportunity.

I hope these tips were helpful : ) and I wish you good luck with your babysitting [job search] (https://www.jobcase.com/jobs/search). Pass this info along to any teen you know!

....Do YOU have any past babysitting experience? Share your story! How was it?

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Maddie A
over 6 months ago

TEENS: What to know about job references

#teensummerjobs #teenjobs #teens #jobsearch #tips #summerjobs #references

Friday’s #teensummerjobs post was about how to make sure you have all the info you need to start applying for summer jobs – catch up here.

If you’re looking for work this summer, you’re probably going to be asked to supply a few references.

A reference is someone who knows your personality, your strengths, and your weaknesses. It could be someone you worked for or worked with, your big brother/big sister mentor (or mentee), your math teacher, coach, teammates or a violin instructor...you get the idea. Basically, references are people who know YOU.

Keep your references as professional as possible, though: don’t use your next-door neighbor (unless you’ve helped them out before, maybe with babysitting or dog walking), your best friend’s mom, or your cousin’s friend’s roommate's brother’s girlfriend.

So, who should (and shouldn’t) you list as a reference?

Good References: • Teachers and tutors • Anyone who oversaw or worked with you in a volunteering program • Group members (from a school project, for example, but only if the outcome was great!) • Advisors or counselors • Former or current supervisors or coworkers

Not-So-Good References: • Family (parents, brothers, sisters, grandparents, aunts, uncles, etc.) • Friends (BFFs included) • People you haven’t worked or interacted with before

Before you use someone as a reference, reach out to each one and ask if they're okay with you listing them. Once you have their permission, get their contact info (phone number and email) and make sure they are okay with being contacted. This is a great way to give them a heads up and time to think about all the glowing things to say about you.

Jobcasers who have “been there, done that” have a lot of good advice and expertise to offer about references. Check out what they’re saying: • TimEmilyJulie

As always, chime into the discussion! Jobcasers make the case for Jobcase.

Keep a look out for more #teensummerjobs updates throughout the month.

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