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Scott Silvers
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about 1 month ago

Has anyone ever had this happen? What did you do about it?

If your background check reveals incorrect information, you should take steps to correct the inaccuracies. Here are some actions you can consider:

Review the Report: Obtain a copy of the background check report to carefully review the information that is incorrect. Make note of specific details that need correction.

Contact the Screening Company: Reach out to the company that conducted the background check. You can find their contact information on the report. Provide them with clear and documented evidence of the inaccuracies and request corrections.

Dispute Process: Most background check companies have a dispute resolution process. Follow their dispute procedures, which may involve submitting written documentation, proof of corrections, or any relevant information that supports your case.

Contact the Employer: If the background check was conducted by a third-party screening company on behalf of a potential employer, inform the employer about the inaccuracies. They may be able to work with the screening company to address the issues.

Provide Documentation: Collect any documentation that supports the correct information. This could include certificates, official records, or other proof that counters the inaccuracies. Submit this documentation as part of the dispute process.

Check with Reporting Agencies: If the inaccuracies involve credit or financial information, contact the credit reporting agencies involved. The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) allows consumers to dispute inaccuracies on credit reports.

Legal Assistance: If the inaccuracies persist and have a significant impact on your employment prospects, you may consider seeking legal advice. Consult with an attorney who specializes in employment law or consumer rights.

Know Your Rights: Familiarize yourself with your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) in the United States. The FCRA provides guidelines on the accuracy and privacy of information in consumer reports, including background checks.

Follow Up: Keep a record of all communications related to the dispute, including dates, names, and any responses received. Follow up regularly to ensure that the corrections are made in a timely manner.

It's crucial to address inaccuracies promptly, especially if they could negatively impact your employment prospects. Employers are generally required to notify you if adverse action is taken based on information in a background check, giving you an opportunity to dispute and correct any inaccuracies. #jobsearch #interview #background #rights

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Scott Silvers
Bullet point
Follow
about 1 month ago

Has anyone ever had this happen? What did you do about it?

If your background check reveals incorrect information, you should take steps to correct the inaccuracies. Here are some actions you can consider:

Review the Report: Obtain a copy of the background check report to carefully review the information that is incorrect. Make note of specific details that need correction.

Contact the Screening Company: Reach out to the company that conducted the background check. You can find their contact information on the report. Provide them with clear and documented evidence of the inaccuracies and request corrections.

Dispute Process: Most background check companies have a dispute resolution process. Follow their dispute procedures, which may involve submitting written documentation, proof of corrections, or any relevant information that supports your case.

Contact the Employer: If the background check was conducted by a third-party screening company on behalf of a potential employer, inform the employer about the inaccuracies. They may be able to work with the screening company to address the issues.

Provide Documentation: Collect any documentation that supports the correct information. This could include certificates, official records, or other proof that counters the inaccuracies. Submit this documentation as part of the dispute process.

Check with Reporting Agencies: If the inaccuracies involve credit or financial information, contact the credit reporting agencies involved. The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) allows consumers to dispute inaccuracies on credit reports.

Legal Assistance: If the inaccuracies persist and have a significant impact on your employment prospects, you may consider seeking legal advice. Consult with an attorney who specializes in employment law or consumer rights.

Know Your Rights: Familiarize yourself with your rights under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) in the United States. The FCRA provides guidelines on the accuracy and privacy of information in consumer reports, including background checks.

Follow Up: Keep a record of all communications related to the dispute, including dates, names, and any responses received. Follow up regularly to ensure that the corrections are made in a timely manner.

It's crucial to address inaccuracies promptly, especially if they could negatively impact your employment prospects. Employers are generally required to notify you if adverse action is taken based on information in a background check, giving you an opportunity to dispute and correct any inaccuracies. #jobsearch #background #rights

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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

This is a snippet of what the government says about background checks in this country. The only information that truly matters. Whenever I research something that has to do with my rights as an American, it must be from a .gov website, whether it's for my state or for the entire country. Many of us do not know our rights, but we have many in this country.... Have a great day.....

Background Checks: What Employers Need to Know FTC When taking an adverse action (for example, not hiring an applicant or firing an employee) based on background information obtained through a company in the business of compiling background information, the FCRA has additional requirements: Before you take an adverse employment action, you must give the applicant or employee: a notice that includes a copy of the consumer report you relied on to make your decision; and a copy of "A Summary of Your Rights Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act," which you should have received from the company that sold you the report. By giving the person the notice in advance, the person has an opportunity to review the report and explain any negative information. After you take an adverse employment action, you must tell the applicant or employee (orally, in writing, or electronically): that he or she was rejected because of information in the report; the name, address, and phone number of the company that sold the report; that the company selling the report didn't make the hiring decision, and can't give specific reasons for it; and that he or she has a right to dispute the accuracy or completeness of the report, and to get an additional free report from the reporting company within 60 days. https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/guidance/background-checks-what-employers-need-know #rights #background #credit #criminal #human

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Valerie I VanOrden
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over 6 months ago

know your rights////dont answer illegal questions.
.

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over 6 months ago

It's apparently true that most people DO NOT #read their #Employee #Handbook, Employee Manuals, Employment Policies and Requirements and definitely not their State Wage and Hours Laws. I know from working in HR for almost 20 years and especially being on here. This is truly sad because people end up losing so much by not looking into what's important and your RIGHTS is what's important more than anything. Educate yourself on what your rights are NOW! EDUCATE YOURSELF on your #RIGHTS in your #State.

[Google... (your states) wage and hour laws]

Stay #educated! Don't let these employers back you into a corner and scare you into thinking you have NO RIGHTS because you do. The problem is YOU DIDN'T BOTHER TO READ THEM! If you did read them, you didn't go to refresh your memory about them.

If you have been terminated, request in writing your PERSONNEL FILE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. I can not stress that enough.

Listening to most of your stories, if they happened as told, you all have real live legal suits that you would win. Did you read that? You WOULD #WIN!

Stop being victims and start being #VICTORIOUS!

In need of some Empowerment? Call Me 917-809-9096

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Gary Milks
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over 6 months ago

I came to work today and found copies of all of the employees names, numbers, and email addresses sitting on a a counter. Apparently management printed multiple copies so that all of the employees would have each other's contact information in case they needed someone to cover their shift. I did not give permission nor would I have if they had asked. Isn't that illegal? I was not happy to see my name is the list, and now 75 strangers have my info.

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Fred Goff
CEO and Founder of JobcaseBullet point
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CEO and Founder of Jobcase
over 6 months ago

Just realized this is the anniversary of Rosa Parks insisting on dignity. MLK, Jr. said “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” How lucky that we have had great people like Rosa Parks to give a little needed push on this 'arc' along the way!
#courage #rights #inspiration

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over 6 months ago

#rights #Legal #drugtest #Physical #help #question #advice #jobsearch Hi. I got a job offer from an agency. They sent me to Kaiser to get a physical. Now I looked over the paperwork and it did not ask for a drug test, HIV test, psych testing, or anything else, just medical results. But there was a box for all those things just listed. There was a box for drug test for HIV test for psych test but none of them were checked. At Kaiser I got poked and prodded. I had my blood taken, urine sample, TB test, and when I asked why or what they were screening for they said nothing. Not only is that answer alarming but I have not given consent to any kind of drug test or anything. Well the reason I'm asking a question is since they did all they it is not legal fir them to report if I had drugs or HIV in my system correct? I never consented. My understanding of California law is that one must be made aware and consent to these kind of tests. I may have had something in my system. And I don't think I have HIV but I'm extremely worried that Kaiser will take my specimens and look for things I didn't consent to. Is this possible? In my employee sheet to Kaiser it had a drug test box and it was not checked and then on kaisers legal paperwork is said drug test but not checked and I certainly did not sign there so no consent was given. I'm worried about my rights being violated. I'm not a drug user but I was in vacation in the Caribbean and made a mistake. I know it stays in your blood for a long time and I'm freaking out. Any help?

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