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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

Fair Chance Hiring Ex-Felons in Demand in Tight Labor Market Due to to the shortage of workers more doors are opening for convicted felons. They are being given A Fair Chance for Employment. These stigmatized people are proving to be worth it... Click on the link below to watch the video and leave a comment with your take on the subject.

https://youtu.be/FQGnh6ek5QY

#felon #hiring #fair chance #worthy #success #human beings

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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

This is a snippet of what the government says about background checks in this country. The only information that truly matters. Whenever I research something that has to do with my rights as an American, it must be from a .gov website, whether it's for my state or for the entire country. Many of us do not know our rights, but we have many in this country.... Have a great day.....

Background Checks: What Employers Need to Know FTC When taking an adverse action (for example, not hiring an applicant or firing an employee) based on background information obtained through a company in the business of compiling background information, the FCRA has additional requirements: Before you take an adverse employment action, you must give the applicant or employee: a notice that includes a copy of the consumer report you relied on to make your decision; and a copy of "A Summary of Your Rights Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act," which you should have received from the company that sold you the report. By giving the person the notice in advance, the person has an opportunity to review the report and explain any negative information. After you take an adverse employment action, you must tell the applicant or employee (orally, in writing, or electronically): that he or she was rejected because of information in the report; the name, address, and phone number of the company that sold the report; that the company selling the report didn't make the hiring decision, and can't give specific reasons for it; and that he or she has a right to dispute the accuracy or completeness of the report, and to get an additional free report from the reporting company within 60 days. https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/guidance/background-checks-what-employers-need-know #rights #background #credit #criminal #human

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Tracey Johnson
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over 6 months ago

A LOL moment #Human resources administration

I really don't remember having any funny moments at this job I'm always business as usual

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Anuradha Prasad
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Stem Teacher at Snapology

I believe ageism and sexism is alive and well in America. However, ask yourself, do you really want to work for a company that discriminates on age and sex. In every interview, the interviewer asks if the interviewee has any questions. This is the perfect time to ask. Also, if you believe it is true ageism. Call the HR department of the company and get the name and number. Then file a complaint with the EEOC. Every state has one. It is an extremely tough job market out there. My suggestion, put that experience to work and become either a Consultant or an independent contractor. Start your own business. I have applied to 3000 jobs in the past 2.5 years. Maybe got 10 interviews. 1 job offer from which I was told to leave after a month or HCA lab Director, threatened to make my life very difficult. No job is worth being harassed. There are plenty of companies out there, this is a very difficult job market. Don't give up.

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Anuradha Prasad
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Stem Teacher at Snapology

I would write a formal letter to Corporate HR and report your regional HR. Better, yet have an Attorney write up the complaint. I would keep this in your resume folder and if asked about what happened. Had the interview a copy of the letter. I find, that unless you fightback against this specific type of harrasment, the instigator will do this behavior again and again. I did this with LabCorp, and I makesure, I never work for or with that company ever again.

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over 6 months ago

In preparation for the transition from military to civilian employment I’ve got a few questions regarding my next step. I'm a military RN and will retire in November 2020. For the past 10 years I've worked in the equivalent of military Human Resources (Education and Training). My job entails keeping track of newly and processed and out process staff, oversight of 5 Learning Management Systems (LMS) training staff on clinical and military requirements. I also managed life support training programs such as Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Advanced Life support (PALS). However, most of my time has been spent improving and managing the LMS systems to deliver highly accurate reports and manage staff. And I really have a strong interest in the area and developed Excel skills that are well beyond my Healthcare counterparts. My questions are “Am I really an LMS administrator? Am I a good fit for such a role in the civilian world? What do other LMS administrators do? And what is their reasonable expected pay rate? I'd love to get comments from people that are already out there, especially if you're working in the LMS or a related field.

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