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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

“Suddenly” losing a source of income can be very unsettling.

Just when it seems all is well, the reality of uncertainty can appear as swiftly as the mysterious music of the Ice Cream Man as his truck rounds the corner.

Disbelief can turn thoughts into self-pity as belief in the ability to provide for the ones who count on us disappears.

There are productive steps that can be taken to navigate the situation:

  1. Losing a job can be emotionally taxing, so allow yourself some time to process your feelings and adjust to the situation. It's normal to feel shocked, angry, or disappointed, but try to maintain a positive mindset moving forward.

  2. Review your termination details: Understand the reasons behind your termination and review any documentation related to it. This information can be useful for future job applications and legal purposes, if necessary.

  3. Assess your financial situation: Evaluate your finances to determine how long you can sustain yourself without a steady income. Create a budget to manage your expenses effectively during this transitional period.

  4. Check your employment benefits: Review your employee benefits, such as severance pay, unused vacation days, or any other entitlements you may have. Familiarize yourself with the terms and conditions surrounding these benefits and ensure you receive what you're entitled to.

  5. File for unemployment benefits: If you're eligible, file for unemployment benefits as soon as possible. These benefits can provide temporary financial assistance while you search for a new job. Contact your local unemployment office or visit their website for guidance on the application process.

  6. Update your resume and online presence: Polish your resume to reflect your most recent experience and accomplishments. Update your LinkedIn profile and other professional networking platforms to showcase your skills and availability for new opportunities.

  7. Network and seek support: Reach out to your professional contacts, colleagues, and friends to let them know about your job search. Attend industry events, join professional organizations, and engage in networking activities to expand your connections and potentially discover job leads.

  8. Explore career options: Take this opportunity to assess your career goals, interests, and skills. Research different industries and job prospects to identify potential career paths that align with your aspirations. Consider acquiring new skills or certifications that could enhance your marketability.

  9. Job search and apply strategically: Start searching for job openings through online job boards like Jobcase, company websites, and professional networks. Tailor your applications to highlight relevant experience and skills for each position. Leverage your network for referrals and keep track of your applications to follow up as needed.

  10. Consider freelance or temporary work: If finding a full-time job takes time, consider taking up freelance work or temporary assignments. These opportunities can help you stay financially afloat and build valuable experience while you continue your job search.

  11. Take care of yourself: Job loss can be stressful, so prioritize self-care. Maintain a healthy routine, engage in activities you enjoy, exercise regularly, and seek support from family and friends. Taking care of your well-being will help you stay positive and motivated during this transition.

Remember, losing a job can happen to anyone, and it's an opportunity for growth and new beginnings. Stay resilient, remain proactive, and keep a positive mindset as you navigate this challenging period. You are not alone. Best of luck in your job search!

#challenge #confidence #worthy

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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

When I got out of the Army minimum wage was $3.35 per hour, which nearly all factories were paying to start out. Where I was, there was one place, Mansion Mobile Homes, that paid far more: $4.50 per hour plus a weekly bonus, which was usually equal to our 40 hour paycheck. To qualify for the weekly bonus, we couldn’t miss more than seven minutes a week. If you missed more than seven minutes, we lost our bonus for the week and it was split up between the rest of the team members that were getting their bonus. It wasn’t difficult getting hired at Mansion because they had such a high turnover rate, which meant they always needed workers, and they had the high turnover rate because many guys and girls couldn’t keep up with the super fast pace or getting yelled at for not being able to keep up. Easy to get in, but tough to stay in. It was either work for $3.35 an hour or get into Mansion. At my interview I was told I am being hired as a plumber. I told him I didn’t know how to do plumbing, He said, “Well, you’ll either learn it or you won’t work here.” I was pretty nervous my first day and for the first close to two weeks my transition into the manufactured home industry was one of being screamed at, ridiculed, and told daily to hit the time clock and go home because I wasn’t going to make it. The plumbing department was the last station before the home was turned around outside by a tractor driver and then pushed back in the door on the other side on dollies into the sidewall department to continue its journey to completion. For almost two weeks I was outside finishing my work rather than getting it completed in station before the line roll like I was supposed to. My problem was my speed and I was moving as fast as I thought I could every minute of the day. There was no way I was going to not make it. That wasn’t an option. I was already used to not giving up on tasks that I wasn’t sure of, so that disbelief in impossible really guided me through this struggle and I also knew I had overcome much tougher situations in the past. What also helped me overcome this problem is my never responding to their words or the pressure they continuously increased upon me, but instead I kept my mouth shut and fixed my focus on doing the job faster and faster. I realized much later why the rest of my team were so hard on me. They had all been there for four years and longer and they earned one of the top wages in the plant. They knew exactly what it takes to test a man to find out if he is capable of handling his part in a fast-paced, problem filled department. Had it not been for their insulting, judging, and cruel techniques, I would have never become as fast as I did and I would have never kept the job. Regardless of the difference in the jobs I’ve had over the years, the best tip I can give is never give an excuse or blame someone or something else for a mistake you made. You will be respected for it. Never deny it, but instead accept responsibility and always listen to the feedback on how to correct it and then act upon it. And the most important to me: Never talk about a coworker in a negative light behind his or her back. This is also good practice for all areas of our lives. Instead, kindly suggest that you both get that person to join in the discussion. Some will get angry, but they will respect you and know that you won’t talk about them behind their back either. When applying for a job, whether or not you have prior experience, know the job so you can talk about it at the interview, know what’s expected of you, know how to do the job in your mind. Don’t be intimidated or have any doubt about your ability to do the job. I did this by remembering that if one person can do something, I can do it too. I merely have to do it the same way someone with experience does it. One more thing that contributed to my success at this job is before signing off on a home I would look at my work and ask myself, “If this were my home, would it be good enough for me?” #overcome #challenge #perseverance #success

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Scott Silvers
Bullet point
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over 6 months ago

When I got out of the Army minimum wage was $3.35 per hour, which nearly all factories were paying to start out. Where I was, there was one place, Mansion Mobile Homes, that paid far more: $4.50 per hour plus a weekly bonus, which was usually equal to our 40 hour paycheck. To qualify for the weekly bonus, we couldn’t miss more than seven minutes a week. If you missed more than seven minutes, we lost our bonus for the week and it was split up between the rest of the team members that were getting their bonus. It wasn’t difficult getting hired at Mansion because they had such a high turnover rate, which meant they always needed workers, and they had the high turnover rate because many guys and girls couldn’t keep up with the super fast pace or getting yelled at for not being able to keep up. Easy to get in, but tough to stay in. It was either work for $3.35 an hour or get into Mansion. At my interview I was told I am being hired as a plumber. I told him I didn’t know how to do plumbing, He said, “Well, you’ll either learn it or you won’t work here.” I was pretty nervous my first day and for the first close to two weeks my transition into the manufactured home industry was one of being screamed at, ridiculed, and told daily to hit the time clock and go home because I wasn’t going to make it. The plumbing department was the last station before the home was turned around outside by a tractor driver and then pushed back in the door on the other side on dollies into the sidewall department to continue its journey to completion. For almost two weeks I was outside finishing my work rather than getting it completed in station before the line roll like I was supposed to. My problem was my speed and I was moving as fast as I thought I could every minute of the day. There was no way I was going to not make it. That wasn’t an option. I was already used to not giving up on tasks that I wasn’t sure of, so that disbelief in impossible really guided me through this struggle and I also knew I had overcome much tougher situations in the past. What also helped me overcome this problem is my never responding to their words or the pressure they continuously increased upon me, but instead I kept my mouth shut and fixed my focus on doing the job faster and faster. I realized much later why the rest of my team were so hard on me. They had all been there for four years and longer and they earned one of the top wages in the plant. They knew exactly what it takes to test a man to find out if he is capable of handling his part in a fast-paced, problem filled department. Had it not been for their insulting, judging, and cruel techniques, I would have never become as fast as I did and I would have never kept the job. Regardless of the difference in the jobs I’ve had over the years, the best tip I can give is never give an excuse or blame someone or something else for a mistake you made. You will be respected for it. Never deny it, but instead accept responsibility and always listen to the feedback on how to correct it and then act upon it. And the most important to me: Never talk about a coworker in a negative light behind his or her back. This is also good practice for all areas of our lives. Instead, kindly suggest that you both get that person to join in the discussion. Some will get angry, but they will respect you and know that you won’t talk about them behind their back either. When applying for a job, whether or not you have prior experience, know the job so you can talk about it at the interview, know what’s expected of you, know how to do the job in your mind. Don’t be intimidated or have any doubt about your ability to do the job. I did this by remembering that if one person can do something, I can do it too. I merely have to do it the same way someone with experience does it. One more thing that contributed to my success at this job is before signing off on a home I would look at my work and ask myself, “If this were my home, would it be good enough for me?” #overcome #challenge #perseverance #success

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Scott Silvers
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over 6 months ago

We must first decide our destination before we can take the steps to get us there… When I used to sit down and begin to write a new story, I would start writing about something and have no idea where the story was going, no in between, no ending. I found a fascination in not knowing because I felt it would be more powerful if it evolved from that moment. It seemed to go okay but it also seemed to take a long time. I would eventually reach a point that I knew it had to end. I struggled for those endings and most never did end. I realize in hind site how foolish I was because I had nothing that I was driving toward, besides a completed story. I didn’t have a destination. I didn’t begin with the end in mind. Had I, my progress could have been measured, my stories would have all had endings, and they would be completed much sooner. What if this concept worked for other areas of my life, not just writing? Does the goal matter if I am able to simplify what it takes to accomplish the goal in a way I can understand and I know is doable? Some of us here may want a better job than we have now, others may just want a job, any job. There could be some of us who want to move up into a higher position at our current job, while others may know a better way to do the job and would love to give it a try on our own. The hardest part is the doing, taking the first step to take the first step, which is only difficult because we think it will be, which leads to the not doing.

Why not challenge ourselves? What do we have to lose? If you need any help figuring something out, let me know, and I’ll tell you what I see. #challenge #destination #begin #steps

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Jason Denney
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over 6 months ago

I like working there at first and a couple weeks later I just got tired of the supervisors blaming me for different things and they even got on the guy that was working next to me about how he was doing his job and he said that he was doing the best he could and supervisors sat around doing nothing but watching people and instead of getting in and helping and trying to help solve a problem they just b**** and complain to you and I just took enough of it and when they wanted you to work 5 days a week plus the weekends I couldn't do it and the pay wasn't enough either

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Dwight Ross
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over 6 months ago

Before your interview at #Challenge manufacturing make sure to...

That place is not the place to work at they’re management sucks and the hours are bad

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Arun Ravindran
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over 6 months ago

What is the biggest challenge of being a Fashion Designer?

#fashion #challenge #dream #dreamjob

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Garin Shaw
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over 6 months ago

It was a terrible place to work. It was very impersonal and they have a turnover rate thats unvelievable

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kingkb brown
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over 6 months ago
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