#wordsofadvice

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Jason Roberson
about 2 months ago

Is it the right job for you?

Hi community, I noticed quite a few questions around the area of “is this a good job or good opportunity?”. If you have potential jobs to look at, first off congrats! I want to provide a job filter system to empower you in choosing what's right for "you".

Truth is no matter what the community says about the pros and cons of a company or role, 2 factors determine if it will work out for you. In brief I’ll share both then I’ll add details for those who want a longer read.

In short - 1. Fit a job into your life goals don’t shrink your life dreams for a job. 2. Persevere and recommit often to that decision and path as long as you are still reaching your goals.

— To being The hero of your story

Long version below.

  1. The job should get you closer to your goals. Not your generic goals(bills), your detailed life goals. If you just want to make ends meet any job will do but it likely won’t last long or won’t be gratifying because it's standing on 1 leg. If you have a clear goal like making an exact amount to get the bills paid while paying for furthering your education or while paying the education of a your kids school or maybe starting a business, that life goal gives you a meaningful and more concrete number, and time commitment to filter jobs through.

When we have life filters it's easy to determine if a job is good for our life. 2. Dan Gilbert's Harvard studies on the keys to happiness found aligning with a decision after its made is a huge factor in staying happy with a choice. When others make a decision for us, and later we face adversity on that path, it's easy to say “I didn’t really want to do this” and blame others for the choice and want to quit. Make a firm job decision you have to live through it!

#jobsearch #interview #advice #application #hiring #hiringevents #hiringnews #wordsofadvice #inspiration #motivation

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Kelly Mazza

Show them why they should hire you.

10w
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Sheantell Lalla

Loyalty and great customer service outstanding performance

2w
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Clifton King

i was gone to take it but they said take it with water so that was out lol

7w
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Janet Brady

I still look at that pic and it reminds me of being a child and walking barefoot on the stones!!

3w
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Greg Mathews
30 days ago

Stroke Survivor

Hi, several years ago, I survived a stroke. I've nearly recovered all my physical skills, but my cognitive skill are still impacted - meaning I have a tough time as recalling all details and my thought process on long strings of information is not what it used to be.

I have a background as a high tech executive. My 'library of business knowledge and experience' is deep.

My challenge is my confidence in effectively doing that roles that show up on my resume.(I've lowered my salary expectations

Question - How do I represent myself?
#wordsofadvice #advice #inspiration

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Aminat Joy
about 1 month ago

Should a candidates include their photo on CVs?

Do you have your photo on your CV?🧐

Now there’s no right or wrong answer to this!

We see a lot of CVs with photos on, professional headshots and even pictures of people on their holidays - so I wanted to hear peoples opinions 🤷‍♂️

Personally, I don’t think it’s needed & unless you’re applying for a role where your face is super important, I’d say avoid it!❌

Some people may think it literally puts a face to the writing & may create a more personal feel to the CV?

What are your thoughts?💭 Do you care?🤔 #jobsearch #resume #application #wordsofadvice #losangeles #hiring

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Ford Simpson

I don't and won't,Ford

4w
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Darryl Towers

I think always good idea

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Saul Rivera
about 2 months ago

COVID-19 vaccination status

Is it smart to let prospect employers know on your resume or cover letter that you're COVID-19 vaccinated? Many jobs opportunities out there are even including vaccination info and requirements on the application process. The Pro I see is that, by disclosing you're vaccinated -booster too- you may have a leg up on other candidates that choose not not disclose their vaccination status.... on the Con side... it is private medical information after all. Thoughts? #coronavirus #interview #jobsearch #wordsofadvice #application #mythoughts

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Michael Carvalho
about 1 month ago

Enjoy the Evenings by looking at Lights

The weekend is a perfect time to take a stroll through your neighborhood to enjoy the Holiday Displays. One of the things I enjoy while working is how people decorate their yards. Each time I pull up to a clients home I can’t help but notice the decorations. This is a house in New Bedford, MA. As I entered the area I couldn’t help but notice the display of lights. It reminds me of the simple things in life that can make me happy. After a stressful day of repairing things, I need to take a minute to appreciate the things I see. I try to share them with you who take a minute to see the things I see. With all the negative things we hear on the news, I try to look at the bright side of things. Hope you enjoy it too? #inspiration #wordsofadvice #advice

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Onila Badillo
about 2 months ago

Walmart gave me the tools to develop my skills, there I learned to work as a team and not only limited me to being a cashier, but also trained me to run the entire store. #jobsearch #management #foodservices #workfromhome #interview #wordsofadvice #application #nationwideusa #hiringnews #customerservice #hiring #parttime #fulltime #warehouse

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Cynthia Okonkwo
over 6 months ago

Prepare A Presentation that Will Wow Them During Your Interview

Businesses use presentations to share information with their employees and other stakeholders. From changes to the organization chart to a new product, increases in market share and stock prices…a presentation makes it possible to inform a large audience all at once. So, it stands to reason the effective interview preparation should include presentation preparation. Furthermore, since speaking to a crowd makes many people nervous, I recommend that a little extra attention be paid to this phase of interview presentation.

As an interview candidate, you could find yourself in one of these three scenarios related to giving a presentation during the selection process: 1) You could be given a topic and other parameters before your interview and asked to be prepared to give a presentation during your interview; 2) You could be asked to give a presentation on a topic of your choice that is related to your career field or the position that you are interviewing for; or 3) You could be asked, during your interview, to give an impromptu presentation on a specified topic. This post offers steps that you can take to ensure that your presentation is exactly what the interviewer(s) are asking for.

I like to think of giving a presentation as a form of story-telling. Determine the point you want to make during your presentation; choose three points related to your chosen point of view to focus on; take each one individually; then present facts that support your point of view. Take this blog post for example. My objective is to help you create an awesome presentation for your next big job interview. So, I am telling you a story about three possible approaches that your potential employer could use to ask you to make a presentation during their selection process. I will present supporting information on each approach separately to help you in your preparation. Then, I will summarize everything and conclude my post. So, you see? One is presenting verbally and the other is presenting in writing, but the approach is very similar.

The first thing that I recommend is that you make a checklist of all of the requirements that your presentation needs to meet. It doesn’t have to be formal or fancy, but it needs to give you a place to track your progress by checking off each requirement as you work towards completion. Your checklist should also include information regarding your presentation platform (i.e., PowerPoint, Sway, etc.). Once you finish creating your presentation, let someone whom you trust, read it to see if it flows well. If time permits, give a copy of your checklist to a group of family members and/or friends. Do a practice run in front of them and ask them for feedback on how well your presentation meets the listed requirements.

Giving a presentation on a pre-determined topic, with other parameters spelled out for you is the most-advantageous scenario to be in. Think about it, you don’t have to stress, wondering if your topic is appropriate. You also don’t have to figure out an appropriate presentation length, etc. The thing that candidates have to remain mindful of when in this scenario, is that the employer is assessing his/her ability to follow instructions. So, if you are asked to do a five-minute presentation on the best way to complete a work task, don’t give a two-minute, or a ten-minute presentation on all the tasks that you do on your job. You will not have met the outlined requirements per the interviewer’s instructions and will likely not receive a high rating. That is definitely not the outcome that you want after all of your hard work.

Giving a presentation on a career-field-related topic of your choice can provide the freedom of feeling comfortable with a topic that you chose. In this scenario, keep in mind that the interviewer is not only assessing your ability to follow directions, but your creativity, and your ability to exercise sound judgment. Your creativity should shine in your use of transitions from one point to the next, sound effects, and images. There is a balancing act, though. You want your transitions to be non-distracting, but to act as facilitators of the information-sharing process. For example, if you use PowerPoint, it will not be a good decision to use sound effects, flashes, etc. with each slide transition. You may want to consider having only a few of your bullet points slide onto the screen and possibly have one slide fade away to reveal the next slide. I recommend that you use sound-effects sparingly. As cute as you may think they are, they can be quite annoying when over-used. Also, if you do not receive instruction on the length of your presentation, try to have it be no longer than five-to-seven minutes long. You want to leave time for a questions/answer period. Thinking about these types of things will show the interviewer that you are good at anticipating the needs of your audience and valuing their time. Remember that they have to sit through more than one interview, so you want them to remember you for the right reasons. Use your time wisely, by presenting your information, offering strong supporting facts in a succinct manner, to make a great impression.

Being asked to give an impromptu presentation is probably the most difficult of all scenarios, but if you keep the interviewer’s objective in mind, you will be able to ace the task. Here, the interviewer will assess your ability to think quickly on your feet, as well as your knowledge of your career field. Realize that in business, whether interacting with employees, the board of directors, customers/clients, or the general public, you will be asked questions and expected to respond “off-the-cuff.” So, take it in stride. You may not be able to anticipate exactly what you could be asked to make a presentation on during an interview; however, a great place to start is the vacancy announcement. While reviewing the most-impactful duty statements for the position, think of how you could create a presentation about the subject matter. Create a mental vision of three points, directly related to your subject, that you could discuss during a short presentation. Even taking the time to try and prepare to this extent, could put you miles ahead of the pack during the selection process.

Having a successful career search is possible…and probable with the right amount of, and perspective on preparation. Be proactive and create your own possibilities. Even if reality is not a perfect match, I guarantee you that you will have the upper hand in the process.

Career Search Success to You! Go Get Your New Job!

Original Post on HR by Nnamtique (nnamtique.com).

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