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Marijoy Bertolini
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over 6 months ago

I ran across an article that talked about **["things a recruiter won't tell you"] (http://integratedstaffingcorp.com/things-a-recruiter-my-not-tell-you/) and the section that popped out to me described assumptions someone might make (or 'red flags') when looking at different types of experience. A good cover letter can overcome these biases, but I thought you'd like to see how your profile might "read" to someone who gives ~10 SECONDS' attention to each resume they see.

  • Too many jobs in a short time = Unstable candidate
  • Too many years at the same company/industry = Inflexible to change
  • Overqualified = Too expensive or won’t stay long
  • Underqualified = Long learning curve
  • Too many different types of jobs = Candidate doesn’t know what he wants

Like I said, a detailed resume and cover letter can avoid these misperceptions by guiding the recruiter toward your strongest accomplishments—and away from the red flags. So remember to keep these things in mind and use examples from your past experience to overcome this bias.

Good luck!!

#recruitersadvice #tips #wordsofadvice

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Julie Jakubiec
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over 6 months ago

As a recruiter, and someone who happens to appreciate fashion, I’m often asked the question of “What do I wear to my interview?”. Don’t get me wrong, I struggle with this too. But each day I say to myself, whether dressing for an interview or the work day, “Dress for the job you want”. I try to dress up a bit on the lookout of my next job. Here are a few tips I put together on how to dress for your interviews, as well as some resources to help in finding the clothes in a very affordable way:

  1. Always do a double check a few days prior to your interview to make sure your outfit is clean, ironed, and free of any stains, holes, and frayed or loose hems.
  2. If you don’t have your own suit or access to one you can go with something as simple as black or grey pants with a button down/tailored shirt or a sweater. And keep the colors more muted in colors like white, pale blue, pale pink, or lilac.
  3. Dresses and skirts in black, and grey are the most appropriate. You will want to stay away from any loud or distracting prints.
  4. If you’re wearing a skirt or dress you will want to make sure to wear tights in nude or black, and check them for any runs or pulls.
  5. Your hair should be neat and tidy, styled in a professional manner. Here some suggestions on hair styles best job interview hairstyles for women (https://www.thebalance.com/best-job-interview-hairstyles-for-women-2061187)
  6. Stay away from any and all heavy perfumes and scented lotions, you never know what someone may be allergic to.

Let me know if you have any questions and as promised, here are a few links to resources for you to check out! https://www.dressforsuccess.org/ http://www.careergear.org/

#interview #dressforsuccess #recruitersadvice #trendingtopics

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Julie Jakubiec
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over 6 months ago

You landed the interview you really wanted, congratulations! Now it’s time to get dressed, and you’re faced with the question of.. “What am I supposed to wear?”. It doesn’t have to be an expense causing you to spend a ton money, there are resources (see below) out there to help. I think the best way to think about it is, wear what you would wear to church especially on a holiday. I took a look at a few articles, and these common themes around dressing for an interview:

  1. Make sure your interview clothes are clean, ironed and free of spots or stains, rips, loose hems, and holes.
  2. Button down shirts ,both long and short sleeved, can be worn alone, under a sweater, or under a jacket/blazer. Some say light colored shirts are more appropriate, others say you can be a bit bold. I would tend to say go more towards light colored, without distracting prints.
  3. Navy blue, grey and black are all the most appropriate colors for suits or blazers. These colors are also great options when just wearing dress pants, and khakis work well too.
  4. Patterned ties are great to add a little bit of personality to your interview outfit. I once had a candidate interview on St. Patrick’s Day who wore a tie with shamrocks, and let’s just say the detail did not go unnoticed. But if you’re more of a striped or solids kind of guy, that’s more than perfect too! Just don’t go TOO crazy!
  5. Be careful with being casual, it can often lead to being too casual. Even in the summer, when companies tend to be slightly more lax about the dress code, you want to make sure you have dress pants or khakis on with a polo or a short sleeved button down.
  6. And lastly, make sure your hair is cut, you stay away from heavy colognes or aftershaves, and always check your teeth before going in to make sure there aren’t any poppy seeds from your morning bagel!

Don’t forget that the candidates that come into an interview dressed for success tend to stand out from the rest. This could be the difference in whether or not you get the job! Good Luck!

http://www.careergear.org/ http://readyforsuccessmn.org/

#interview #recruitersadvice #trendingtopics #dresscode #dressforthejobyouwant

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Marijoy Bertolini
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over 6 months ago

I just want to tell everyone that when you get a call from a recruiter or hiring manager, that person is really excited to talk to you! Remember that you're being interviewed because they see something in your background that they like. To combat nerves, keep in mind that the interviewer is hoping you're a great fit. Go to it, Jobcasers! Show them what you've got!!

#inspiration #recruitersadvice #tips

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Marijoy Bertolini
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over 6 months ago

Hi Jobcasers ~ I found an article you might like about "how to calm interview anxiety". **[Click here] (http://www.vocationvillage.com/how-to-calm-your-job-interview-anxiety/) ** It includes tips like: "get a good night's sleep TWO nights before your interview," "avoid people in your life who are habitually negative," and "eat protein an hour before your interview (to stay full)" in addition to the advice you've regularly heard like "research the company" and "plan your route ahead of time." There are also tips on how to **manage the physical symptoms of anxiety.

Let us know if you have any others you think work well, ok? Thanks! Go, Jobcasers, Go!! #interview #tips #recruitersadvice

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Marijoy Bertolini
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over 6 months ago

Head's up, Jobcasers!! Keep in mind that hiring season kicks into gear in SEPTEMBER. That means you have to prepare ahead of time, so look at your profile - fill it in, have someone review it, review interview questions & PRACTICE (either with someone or on your own using a video/smartphone/etc.), and check in with references. Give yourself time to research employers & hiring events, get comfortable with talking about yourself, and figuring out logistics (commute, what you're going to wear, etc.).

Here are a few posts that will help you get ready:

I know it's summer, but keep in mind that time flies when you're having fun! Good luck everyone!! #recruitersadvice #interview #tips

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Julie Jakubiec
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over 6 months ago

I’m talking about the bias around “job hoppers”. Somewhere along the way a stigma formed that “job hoppers” are BAD. They won’t be reliable, definitely not loyal, and they’ll jump at the next best opportunity. And while sometimes this may be true, let’s be positive and focus on when it’s not.

The way I see it is, the workforce of the past stayed in their jobs for years upon years. It was a different time, there was a different kind of respect & loyalty between employer & employee and there was nothing wrong with staying at the same company for 20+ years. In some situations, employees had no other choice but to stay.

But things are different now, today is definitely not like the days of the past. New industries are being created every day, and with that comes a multitude of new roles obviously which equates to more choice. Another factor is the exorbitantly high cost of attending higher learning institutions, resulting in a greater number of people who aren’t able to attend. Non-college job seekers may have started lower on the salary scale & feel pressure to catch up; plus, with a longer work history, they have more opportunities to try to find their true passion.

College or no, not everyone is lucky enough to find their “dream job” right away or even for years. But this shouldn’t always be viewed as a bad thing. Part of what makes our country so wonderful is that, as employees, we have a multitude of choices. As employers, we should not be judging any member of the workforce for taking advantage of that. Would I be more apt to question if a candidate is making a move every one to two months? Probably, but at least give them the opportunity to explain it. They may have truly had the misfortune of being oversold on an opportunity, they may have been subject to a layoff (we hear about them every day), or maybe they fell into an unfortunate event in their personal life that they had no control over.

So my ask here is simple.. Have some empathy. If an applicant meets the experience requirements laid out in your job description, give them the opportunity to tell their story and hear them out. Who knows, these could be your next best employees or (dare I say it?) ROCK STARS! And I’m very aware of the cost associated with employment, and - yes - you may be faced with replacing a few. But doesn’t that outweigh the cost of having NO ONE doing the work. They just need a chance to prove themselves, and didn’t we ask someone to take a chance on us at some point in our careers?

#recruitersadvice #trendingtopics

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Marijoy Bertolini
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over 6 months ago

If you don't get the job, don't forget to send a Thank You note anyway. Make sure to mention that you're 'still interested in (company) and would like to be considered for future opportunities." That way, you can follow up when you see another job at the same company that you're interested in ~ and reference your previous experience & Thank You note! (Keep the networking going!) Good luck!

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Julie Jakubiec
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over 6 months ago

Some of us have had the opportunity to work with some really wonderful people throughout our jobs/careers. These are the people that have been in the trenches with us day in and day out whether it be a manager or a teammate, or a teacher if just coming out of school. These are the people that we’ve been side by side with when things have been tough, and that you’ve celebrated the wins with. They’re the ones that you always could rely on to cover your shifts, and not just because you covered theirs. Or as managers/teachers, they provided you with the support and encouragement you needed to be successful. But most importantly, they are the people that can speak to your hard work, the quality if your work, your dedication, and all of your other positive working attributes. So when a potential employer asks you for references, these are the people to think of immediately or to have an ongoing list of. On this list, try to have as many prior managers/supervisors as possible, but it’s ok to have teammates that can speak to your performance and work ethic just as well (but maybe refrain from having your “best friend”). Your references should be able to present your best side to a potential employer. And before you send the names over to your potential next employer, make sure that you have given your references the heads up that they may receive a call. As someone that has checked hundreds of references, it can be very frustrating to surprise someone with a reference call or play an endless game of phone tag. Good luck out there!

#recruitersadvice #trendingtopics #references

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Julie Jakubiec
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over 6 months ago

So you’ve landed the job, congratulations! Now that you’re there, how do you stand out from your colleagues and ensure that not only do you stay, but you are viewed as someone that can potentially moved up? Here are a few things that make employees really shine, or that make them (dare I say it) Rock Stars! And if you’re already doing some or all of these, well done! And if you’re not that’s ok too, now is a great time to start!

  1. Be POSITIVE, coming in with a negative attitude can affect everyone’s mood and their day.
  2. Make sure to check in with your manager before leaving for the day to see if there is anything else that they need help with.
  3. Stay out of and away from any form of gossip. I know how easy it may be to sometimes be drawn into it, but avoid it like the chicken pox! Nothing ever ends well when it comes to gossip.
  4. Never forget the art of saying “please” and “thank you” when it comes to both your team members and your manager, even for small things
  5. When in a customer facing role never let the customer see that you’re having a bad day. And regardless of the role you’re in try to not let your manager see it as well.
  6. Bring new ideas to the table when given the opportunity. But keep in mind that there is a difference in making suggestions when there is an open forum vs. being too vocal and soliciting unwanted advice.
  7. RESPECT your team members and your manager. They are going to be the people you spend most of your time with and even if they drive you a little crazy, you need to be able to work with them day in and day out. We’re all different!
  8. Take initiative! If you see something not being done and you can do so without stepping on someone’s toes, go ahead and do it! Managers view employees very highly that are willing to roll up their sleeves and pitch in!

#recruitersadvice

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