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Marijoy Bertolini
over 3 years ago
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Resumes for Older Workers

Job searching is tough for anyone, but when you're over 40, it can be really confusing to fit all of your experience into a cohesive "story." Here are some resume-writing tips when you have a lot to write about: ~ Focus your resume. Don't overwhelm a manager with details - focus on one or two positions you're pursuing. Use a one-page resume, if possible; no more than two pages! ~ Use the right "key words". Read the job description very carefully and hone in on words you know will attract the recruiter's attention. Use specific examples to 'prove' you've got the right experience pertaining to those terms. ~ Leave graduation dates off resume. Be honest (always!), but don't highlight your grad date. Also, it's ok to omit anything prior to 15 years' work experience. (Especially since it's probably not relevant.) ~ Quantify your accomplishments. Write down all the key skills and traits you have that qualify for the job you want, and then write out specific incidences and examples that prove you have these skills and traits. Use percentages, dollar amounts, and quantities wherever possible, as they're tangible and persuasive. Emphasize current skills and the results you've obtained using them. ~ Stay current. Research your desired industry, company, and/or position so you know what's happening in the market TODAY. Use this information in your conversation with interviewers. ~ Be persistent and positive. The job market is tough for everyone ~ if you're not selected, you may never know why. Remind yourself of how awesome you are and bounce back quickly if you get rejected. The more lines in the water, the more fish you'll catch!

Good luck, Jobcasers!! Marijoy

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Marijoy Bertolini
over 3 years ago
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Best profile pictures

I want all Jobcasers to get fantastic jobs! To help you achieve your dreams, follow 3 rules: friendly smile, dress for the job you want, and only show yourself in the picture. Hiring managers, owners, and HR folks are on this site every day, so you want to demonstrate how you'd present yourself to potential customers/colleagues/etc. No pets, no masks, wear a clean shirt, and smile - it makes you look approachable and professional. They aren't playing around and neither should you (not on a jobs site anyway).

No need to get a professional photo taken, just choose one that makes you look like someone YOU'D like to hire! And if you're not sure if your pic is OK, ask someone you trust about the picture you're going to publish to the world - this is your chance to show yourself in the best light possible... go for it, Jobcasers! You're awesome, so let's see it!!

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Julie Jakubiec
over 3 years ago
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What questions will the interviewer ask?

We read/hear this all the time! And we're also often are asked how to best prep for an interview. So I thought I would address these both together (from a “what questions to prep for” perspective) and share something with you that I recently came across when researching what the most common interview questions are. Here's what I found.. https://www.uchastings.edu/career-office/docs/26.InterviewQuestions.pdf Now keep in mind that a number of these are directed towards a specific role, but the majority of them are universal. I hope this helps in your ongoing quest of how to prep in order to be able to clearly answer the questions in your interviews this week!

Good luck out there!

#recruitersadvice #interview #trendingtopics

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Julie Jakubiec
over 3 years ago
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The Do’s & Don’ts of Interviewing for Employers

Even as a recruiter with many years of experience I sometimes forget to adequately prepare for an interview. In fact, one of my biggest faults is forgetting a business card. How can I expect candidates to send me a “thank you” if I don’t share my info with them? So just make it easy on them and bring your business card! This is just one of the many things needed to prepare for interviews, no matter the role or the company. You want to ensure that you are providing every candidate with a positive candidate experience so that they walk away from the interview feeling excited for the role and hoping to receive an offer (whether they’re fit or not). Candidate experience continues to be of increased importance, and in today’s digital age a bad review of the company or interview process can show up when you least expect it. I put together a few things to DO to prepare for the interview, as well as a few DON’Ts when interviewing:

  1. DO: Come prepared! Make sure that you have reviewed the candidate’s resume, Jobcase profile, and any additional notes you might have (i.e. recruiter notes, recommendations, praises, etc.).
  2. DO: Bring a business card if available.
  3. DO: Have a clear objective for the interview.
  4. DO: Do not share feedback between interviews to ensure that you’re going into an interview unbiased (Personalities mix very differently so basing your opinion on the feedback from someone else you’re running the risk of missing out on a great potential employee).
  5. DO: Arrive on time - coming late can throw off the entire interview schedule. Most candidates have taken time off to meet with you so be respectful of their time.
  6. DO: Close the interview with next steps or a realistic timeframe for when they’ll hear back, but stick to that timeframe. We see more comments that you can imagine about candidates not hearing back in a timely manner or at all.
  7. DON’T: Check your phone throughout the interview, stay engaged in the conversation
  8. DON’T: Disengage during the interview regardless of whether you determine the candidate is a fit. This results in a poor candidate experience which could turn into a negative interview on sites like Glassdoor, Yelp, etc.
  9. DON’T: Rush through the interview.
  10. DON’T: Ask questions related to (these are deemed as discriminatory): Race, Religion, Gender, Age, Place of birth, Lineage or Ethnicity, Marital Status and/or Sexual Preference, Children, Location and Commute, Disability or Illness. Here are some additional resources on this topic and how to reframe questions: https://knowhownonprofit.org/how-to/how-to-avoid-illegal-or-innapropriate-interview-questions http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/04/09/off-limits-questions-job-interviews_n_7028050.html

#recruitersadvice #interview #tips

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Mark Bryan
over 3 years ago
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Importance of controlling your Attitude

“Attitude” is such an important topic and I just wanted to see what other people think about this. In my opinion, having a good attitude in the workplace is SO IMPORTANT! Even if you are having a really bad day, staying positive and calm can go such a long way in how your office/co-workers view you.

You always hear that “attitude” is something you can control but what do you think?

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Marijoy Bertolini
over 3 years ago
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Talking yourself out of a job – or not

“WHAT DID HE JUST SAY?!” immediately went through my head. My second thought was, “Oh, no. My STAR candidate just TALKED HIMSELF OUT OF A JOB!” I had just asked my candidate to outline a strategy to achieve the primary goal of the position for which he was interviewing… and he said, “Oh, that would be hard. Those people (the clients) are awful to work with.” My candidate has 13 years of experience. He has built whole departments from the ground up, including in a startup environment. Is the job hard? Yes, no doubt. But he was INTERVIEWING TO GET HIRED. This is an example of someone who has talked himself out of the job. Now, don’t get me wrong. It’s not impossible to recover from saying the wrong thing. If he admitted that ‘that came out wrong.’ Or said, ‘The clients are tough, but I’ve had success doing (an example or 2 )…’ Or ‘I think clients would respond well to your company because I’ve seen (example) work well,’ we would have moved along and had a really engaging conversation. As it was, however, there was nowhere to go. I asked follow up questions to give him an opportunity to recover, to no avail. Unfortunately, I could not move forward because he had just told me that he’s not interested in moving forward – because moving forward would mean working with (paying) clients who are ‘awful’. And he stuck to it. Sorry, but there are so many great candidates out there, I want someone who is excited by the challenge. Also, HE deserves to find a role that HE’S excited about.
And that’s the moral of the story: there are lots of jobs & lots of candidates out there in the world. Your experience is valuable – you are valuable – so take the time to understand what the new company needs, make sure your experience translates well, and use your experience to sell the heck out of yourself!

#interview #jobsearch

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Marijoy Bertolini
over 3 years ago
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Warning! Don’t forget WHEN interviews start!!!

When does your interview start? Hint: It’s not when you’re sitting across from the interviewer. Your interview starts the minute you reach out to a company. (Do you sound professional and mature? Do you sound enthusiastic? Are you speaking clearly?) You’re being interviewed when you fill out your application (Can you follow directions? How’s your handwriting/grammar/spelling?). If an employer has to leave a message on your voicemail, what message are they going to hear? (“What’s Up? You know what to do… (BEEP!)” is just not professional.)

Once you’ve survived the application process, plan your interview day properly. Plan your route and your outfit, bring copies of your resume, a pen/paper, change for the parking meter, and give yourself a few minutes to find the building/HR office, etc. And once you arrive, of course, be nice to everyone (the receptionist is a KEY part of the interview process!!) and turn your phone on MUTE.

Remember to smile and give a firm handshake while looking your interviewer in the eyes.

If you’re a regular Jobcaser and have seen our Interview Tips, you have practiced interview questions & you’re prepared for the face-to-face conversation. Now that you’re here… You’ve got this.

Good luck awesome Jobcasers! #interview #RecruitersAdvice

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Marijoy Bertolini
over 3 years ago
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Fall hiring season has BEGUN!

Companies are starting to kick into Fall hiring season, so Jobcasers should FILL IN THEIR PROFILE and KICK THEIR SEARCH INTO HIGH GEAR! Good luck everyone!!

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Marijoy Bertolini
over 3 years ago
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Recruiters are excited about YOU!

I just want to tell everyone that when you get a call from a recruiter or hiring manager, that person is really excited to talk to you! Remember that you're being interviewed because they see something in your background that they like. To combat nerves, keep in mind that the interviewer is hoping you're a great fit. Go to it, Jobcasers! Show them what you've got!!

#inspiration #recruitersadvice #tips

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Julie Jakubiec
over 3 years ago
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Will you be my reference? Tips on who you should be asking!

Some of us have had the opportunity to work with some really wonderful people throughout our jobs/careers. These are the people that have been in the trenches with us day in and day out whether it be a manager or a teammate, or a teacher if just coming out of school. These are the people that we’ve been side by side with when things have been tough, and that you’ve celebrated the wins with. They’re the ones that you always could rely on to cover your shifts, and not just because you covered theirs. Or as managers/teachers, they provided you with the support and encouragement you needed to be successful. But most importantly, they are the people that can speak to your hard work, the quality if your work, your dedication, and all of your other positive working attributes. So when a potential employer asks you for references, these are the people to think of immediately or to have an ongoing list of. On this list, try to have as many prior managers/supervisors as possible, but it’s ok to have teammates that can speak to your performance and work ethic just as well (but maybe refrain from having your “best friend”). Your references should be able to present your best side to a potential employer. And before you send the names over to your potential next employer, make sure that you have given your references the heads up that they may receive a call. As someone that has checked hundreds of references, it can be very frustrating to surprise someone with a reference call or play an endless game of phone tag. Good luck out there!

#recruitersadvice #trendingtopics #references

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