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Tonya Murray
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4 days ago

I am currently looking for work and hiring agencies are getting in touch with me (and some are ghosting me) but when they ask me why I left a job in my history, I don't really want to get into the details. What is the best way to handle this? And we parted on not-so-good terms and the new company reached out - are they going to get into the gory details of how bad the break up was? As more and more time goes by with no real meaty interest in my applications and submissions THIS thought rose to the surface. Thanks in advance for your #feedback

#jobsearch #advice

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Sue Elvins
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Quality Assurance Analyst

@Tonya Murray Whenever a question comes about why you left an employer the response can be said, "left on mutual decision" That explains you and the company both agreed to disagree.

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Malcolm Hawthonre
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i would just keep things short and simple.

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Joyce Winters
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5 months ago

An exit interview is a survey conducted with an individual who is separating from an organization or relationship. Most commonly, this occurs between an employee and organization and/ or a member and association.

The exit interview has 3 purposes: to learn where the company can improve itself, to make sure employees leave feeling good about their service and, in some cases, to encourage the employee to stay under new circumstances. Discovering why employees leave should be an essential part of a company's strategic planning, but many miss this opportunity. Some companies may feel that there is no need to complete an exit interview because their turnover rate is so low, but I beg to differ! Turnover rates have increased drastically due to the pandemic, inflation is happening everywhere, and people are waking up and realizing that there are so many other jobs available that has higher pay and more benefits/incentives etc.

Please share with me some of your experiences with Exit interviews. Do you think they are beneficial? Does your company offer them anymore to employees who have decided to walk away from the company? After sharing your thoughts and giving your feedback with leadership, what was their response? Did they encourage you to stay?

#exitinterviews #feedback #experience #retention #turnover

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Phoebe Montrie
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✨A Bartender, Who Loves Customer Service and Helping Others!!✨

This is a great question! I've personally never done a formal one but I'm curious about others experiences with them! It seems like such a smart idea to check in with an employee before they leave to hear their thoughts about working there. I would want to know how my former employees really felt about their jobs and the company culture so that I could make productive improvements in the future, if I was a manager!

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Robert Simmerman
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Meat Cutter at Jimmy Dean Meat Co

I worked for a company for 4yrs and found a better job, I had a exit interview and told them that I was going to work closer to home and would be making more money. They thanked me for the work I had done there

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Joyce Winters
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5 months ago

An exit interview is a survey conducted with an individual who is separating from an organization or relationship. Most commonly, this occurs between an employee and organization and/ or a member and association.

The exit interview as 3 purposes: to learn where the company can improve itself, to make sure employees leave feeling good about their service and, in some cases, to encourage the employee to stay under new circumstances. Discovering why employees leave should be an essential part of a company's strategic planning, but many miss this opportunity. Some companies may feel that there is no need to complete an exit interview because their turnover rate is so low, but I beg to differ! Turnover rates have increased drastically due to the pandemic, inflation is happening everywhere, and people are waking up and realizing that there are so many other jobs available that has higher pay and more benefits/incentives etc.

Please share with me some of your experiences with Exit interviews. Do you think they are beneficial? Does your company offer them anymore to employees who have decided to walk away from the company? After sharing your thoughts and giving your feedback with leadership, what was their response? Did they encourage you to stay?

#exitinterviews #feedback #experience #retention #turnover

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Eleana Bowman
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over 6 months ago

Ever since I first started working, I was always a little nervous about annual reviews. Not because I thought I was doing the wrong things, like getting to work late every day or doing a poor job overall, but because having your boss to improve, did not always feel great. For some reason, especially earlier in my career, I had been conditioned to have a fight or flight response to criticism, I know I am not the only one to feel this way. But not all criticism is bad. Some criticism is actually good feedback given to help people grow their skill. Sometimes all it takes for us to benefit from the good kind of feedback is the willingness to listen.

Do you want to learn about good criticism and how to benefit from it?

Check out this helpful article on How to give (and accept) constructive criticism: Tips and examples #advice #wordsofadvice #feedback

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Jennifer Young
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over 6 months ago
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Donald Cox CRT-RCP
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Know your 'STUFF'. I have found many HR people are relatively clueless about the full aspect of what you try to get across to them. They are very complacent. Many have been in the same position for a long time. They act like robots. Two dimensional thinkers. No grey matter in the middle. This is wide spread.

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Violet Moore
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How long have you been out of the work force, and it doesn't matter how long you are out of the work force because you do have skills, did you work before and even though you a at home wife or mother, it doesn't matter, get you a piece of paper, sit on your bed or at your table and write down what you did on your last job or jobs, and what you do at home, I guarantee you, you will see all the experience that you have and then some. The only thing is when you go out there to find a job, you have to sell yourself. Before you go out that door to go to an interview or fill out an application, I know you have mirrors in your home, stand in front of one of them mirrors and say to yourself or out loud, "I may have been out of the work force for sometime," but guess what, I'm better than anybody else that is coming to get this or any other job." Own that job that you are going for, because when you own it, it becomes yours!! :))

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It's Your Time "Believe and Achieve"
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over 6 months ago

I'm telling you the truth...

THOUGHT: There are no two interviewing sessions alike. That's a fact!

SITUATION: One session could possibly end with very little interaction between you and the interviewer or the script could flip. An experience interviewer could do a brief recap of some points that he found sensitive in nature and mention your responses, and offer some TIPS. Or he could move in a different direction, everything is at his discretion.

5 - UNDENIABLE TIPS TO CONSIDER:

  1. Be mindful of what he's saying.
  2. Be attentive and make eye contact.
  3. Be cognizant of his body language.
  4. Be responsive and not reactive
  5. Be courteous and respectful.

Second chances are rare, however, if a position should open in the near future, let your conduct speak for itself.

I Believe You Can...!

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Mr. Cameron Lacy Sr.
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over 6 months ago

I'm soooo tired of putting apps online and no one calls you back. What's the point? It's really frustrating to get no feed back on any of them. I have valid driver's license, no bad background, Clean system. So what's the problem employers?

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William Hunt
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over 6 months ago

it is a great place to work. i really love my lob.

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Leonard Pace
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over 6 months ago

I have read many rejection letters over the years while looking for jobs, and I was thinking, wouldn't it be great to know the REAL reason that those resumes were not being considered for the position? Has anyone ever had the guts to reach out and ask why their resume wasn't considered? I think feedback is so important and I wish I had asked for more of it. I think maybe I was too scared of rejection at that time.

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