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Tonya Murray
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Ambitious professional with nearly 22 years of experience pioneering solutions.

I am currently looking for work and hiring agencies are getting in touch with me (and some are ghosting me) but when they ask me why I left a job in my history, I don't really want to get into the details. What is the best way to handle this? And we parted on not-so-good terms and the new company reached out - are they going to get into the gory details of how bad the break up was? As more and more time goes by with no real meaty interest in my applications and submissions THIS thought rose to the surface. Thanks in advance for your #feedback

#jobsearch #advice

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4 days ago
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Debbie Turner
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Just tell them in your interview that the company was going in a different direction, and you saw that there was not opportunity for advancements. And act professional about it. I've been too honest because no one would believe my working conditions and I think it cost me job offers, I worked in senior living and the residents started asking me why I was still there because they heard and saw my boss yelling and cussing at me. I was second in command. Go figure. Good luck!

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Ted Dendinger
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It Network Administrator at Medical Managemane Billing Solutions

I wouldn’t go into all the dirty details but I would be as truthful as possible about it. Saying there were issues with management isn’t good because they may see that as you having problems with authority. It is tricky and if you left the company on bad terms there is no telling what they will say about you if they’re contacted. If I am asked, I usually say that i had reached my ceiling and there was no room to grow or advance or you saw this position and it seemed to be a very good fit for your skill set.

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Jim Willett Willett
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Your former employer can only disclose start date/ end date; pay rate and are you eligible for rehire by law. Any other info can be categorized as defamation.

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Rebecca Thomson
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Sales Associate Cashier at Eagle Hardware

I can't think of any reason not to answer questions. My full time job was raising 4 sons. I have all been breeding teacup Yorkshire Terrier puppies. I've worked plenty over the years. Most recently was when Touched by an Angel was filming here in Utah. My resume may appear rather sparse however, I have great work ethics, integrity and I'm rather nice to be around.

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RHONDA MOORE
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There was no opportunity for advancement. My skills weren't being utilized.

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Klaus Nolte Nolte
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These days...just say "it's not something I want to get into in great detail..this is my employment history"..and that should be that !

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Naomie Caswell
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If someone is going ghost on you, you don't want to work with them. They are already exercising a suspicious nature, and you don't need to invite that negativity into your life. There is a position only you can fill, and that company will welcome you. This seems incredible, but then..What are dreams made of..!?🕊️

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Summer Perskin
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Potential employers are not supposedly allowed to ask for such details, but they can ask your previous employer if they would hire you back.

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James Waller
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Warehouse Labor at Amazon

Hey Tonya, Debbie gives a good option. Myself, I don't even go into that much detail. The most I tell them might be stated simply as "higher pay (opportunity)" or "advancement possibilities" or perhaps the lack thereof. Give NO details. Save details for the interview. EVERYBODY understands the desire to earn better wages. There is really no follow up questions for those statements. GOOD LUCK!!! I'm sure you will do fine.

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Andrew Stapp
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I agree with Debbie. Take the high road and disclose as little as possible without being evasive. Different vision different directions goals etc.. In the highly unlikely event your previous employer says anything negative about you your refusal to reply in kind with your new potential employer will speak volumes about your integrity and character

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