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Michael Carvalho
Bullet point
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3 months ago

One of the biggest changes to job hunting in the past couple of decades is the increasing presence of social media. Social networks have opened new channels for connecting with professionals and searching for jobs (LinkedIn, anyone?), but they don’t come without risks.

While we all want to be ourselves and speak freely, there are a few things you should avoid posting during your search.

  1. Never Post Anything Discriminatory First, let’s get this out of the way: never post anything racist, sexist, homophobic, ageist, or otherwise discriminatory. It should go without saying that such sentiments can harm your professional reputation. It’s also flat-out harmful to others; don’t do it.

  2. Don’t Share Disparaging Commentary About Companies You’ve Worked For Most of us have experienced burnout, work stress, or a job we flat-out hated, and it’s natural to want to vent. But before you search for the latest TikTok earworm to accompany a video about your ridiculous boss or demanding company, remember that your future employer could be watching. Without context—they don’t yet know your work ethic and judgment—speaking poorly about a current or former job isn’t a great look.

It’s important to note that this doesn’t apply to whistleblowing; if you’re calling out racist, sexist, homophobic, or otherwise illegal or immoral behavior, you may want to speak up. Some companies may still shy away from your candidacy, but that will likely put them into your “no” pile anyway.

  1. Keep Your Anger About the Job Hunting and Interviewing Process Under Wraps Looking for a new job is, as they say, a full-time job in and of itself. It’s exhausting, it can be upsetting, and it puts you in a position of feeling interrogated and judged. It’s fair to feel annoyed when you don’t receive quick updates or when you don’t get a call for a job you know you’d love. Sharing observations or general frustrations about the process is okay; commiserating about the challenges of the hunt can be a great icebreaker on LinkedIn.

What you shouldn’t do is rant about how recruiters are terrible at their jobs, your last interviewer doesn’t know what they’re talking about, or anything else hurtful. As with the point above, calling attention to unacceptable or harmful behavior is fair game but should be done with care.

  1. Only Show Good Judgment, Especially Regarding the Law Social media helps us connect and stay in touch, so it’s natural to post about fun times with friends. While the corporate world should have a blanket understanding that everyone has a life outside of work, not every company has caught up.

For some roles, even an innocuous photo with a beer at a barbecue could cause concern. Whether you want to obscure that type of info is up to you and will depend on your field. Regardless, nothing illegal should ever be viewable to the public.

  1. Ensure Any Sensitive Personal Information Is Private While you may be comfortable sharing about your health or family, you likely don’t want to share it with your interviewers or future boss.

Make good use of privacy settings on platforms that have them. On platforms with less robust privacy options, before you post, ask yourself if you’d be happy to discuss the topic in an interview and use your best judgment. #Jobadvice #applying

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Johnny Sepulveda
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over 6 months ago

Ok, I've been somehow directed to this site when I click on one of many emails promising me NEW OPPORTUNITY FOR YOU and it's part of my routine to click through each of them. I work contract gigs so I have to constantly be looking seeing that my roles last between 3 and 6 months. And I keep ending up in this place, which is far and away much different than any other job site. Why?

  • The complaining. For those of you who attach your actual names to complaints about the hiring process, the hiring directors, why you're a "victim" or "not being treated fairly"? I question your sanity. Because if you don't think your name being associated with rants about finding a job isn't a negative against you? Then you need to wise up. Looking for pointers or asking about different approaches ("Haven't heard from interviewer...should I call?") is one thing. Yelling out online that "I QUIT" or "THIS IS HOPELESS" or '"NOBODY WILL HIRE ME" will make you very unattractive to employers. Assume everything you write here is being seen by potential employers.

  • The random declarations - The "I'm a fork-lifter with 10 years of experience. I need a job ASAP" routine. What the hell is this? How does anyone think this shout-out to no one in particular is going to be received. You are not applying or inquiring about a specific position or to a specific company. You are promoting yourself unsolicited to other job seekers. What good could this possibly do? Or, for those that do this? Have you no experience in formally applying for jobs? And if you don't, this is not the right way.

    HOW TO FIND A JOB

    • What is your desired position that you are qualified to do? __________________
    • Name another ______________
    • Name a position that you're not thrilled about doing but you'd do to pay the bills _________________
    • Name a position that might not be great at first but there's opportunity to move up (eg: dishwasher to cook) _________

Now, make a resume and not just one, but one for every job you apply for. "WHAT? THAT'LL TAKE FOREVER!" Um, no it won't. You start with the fact-based chronological resume. All the positions you've had. The training. The skills. The accomplishments. The education. Everything you've ever done on one master resume. This is not one you will ever send out. This is the one you will copy-and-paste from to make tailor-made resumes for every kind of position you apply for. When I was in college, I worked as a file clerk at a law firm. But had been cooking for years before that and still worked nights at a bistro to make extra money. I had my "law firm" resume stressing my filing, reading, organizational skills and I had my cooking resume with the obvious skills and experience being highlighted. Both came from same Master Resume, but both were unique to whatever kind of job I was applying to. I currently have 8 resumes. I work in technology and there's a lot of overlapping, shared skills, but each one highlights exactly what the employer wants to see for their specific role. Make a master resume. And make specialized ones from it.

  • Contact both past co-workers/supervisors/clients as well as personal friends for professional and personal references. And coach them on what to say. Don't let them "improvise" when they get a call. Say: "If they call, please state I led my teams with enthusiasm and communicated my goals with success and always made my deadlines..." This way, they won't feel put on the spot. Or if they're busy when they get the call, they won't give a crap answer to get off the call. They'll revert to the one line you gave them and frankly, that's all you need. You don't want them to go on and on. "Johnny? He's great. Enjoyed working with him. Led our production teams and our crew loved his enthusiasm. And we could count on him to make those deadlines, which is the biggest priority for his position." Your bullet points in his/her words. Done.

  • Know your situation - If you're aren't in a rush to find work and aren't sure you want to continue what you've been doing and even if you're short on time: LEARN SOMETHING NEW --- for god's sakes, you can watch Harvard lectures for free on YouTube. I myself -- because I have to -- have learned 7 software programs in the past 6 months. Why? Because that's the way of the world now. My skill set last summer? Was fine for last summer, And the contract job I had then. But these new jobs?? They want more skills. More knowledge. And I make sure I can offer what they want. I just started coding (java, html) as well as development video courses on Lynda.com and LinkedIn. If you would've asked me a year ago if I'd be taking coding classes? I would've laughed and said: "I can't do that stuff." But you know what? The hell I can't. Is it easy? NO. But with online courses today (videos, exercise sheets, etc), it's not as difficult as I imagined. MAKE YOURSELF MORE VALUABLE. There is no shortage of resources online to make you a better candidate. Stop bitching on here and start learning or you'll be left behind no matter what job you want.

  • I'm 51 years old. And I work with mainly 20-and 30-somethings. How? See above. I stay CURRENT with my skills and I am already an easygoing, affable professional who can get along with anyone, doesn't mind having a supervisor younger than me (trusted they know what they're doing), so the whole age thing? Is moot. I don't volunteer my age. My high school graduation. I buy Just for Men hair dye before interviews and don't dye all the grey away but enough to shave off a couple years. I dress in current style. And my haircut is youthful. And I exercise regularly.. THESE ALL MATTER. I look younger now than I did when I was 35 (overweight, drank too much, my appearance wasn't a priority). Proving to a hiring director or whoever that you can jive with those younger than you? Needs to happen immediately in the interview. SMILE. BE AT EASE. You're the mature experienced one. INTERVIEW THEM. DON'T COME OFF AS ARROGANT OR UNWILLING TO BE TRAINED OR WORK WITH YOUNGER PEOPLE. BE EXCITED about collaborating. Let them know that. Don't bring up your bum knee or your migraines or your insulin shots or leaving early on Wednesdays to make physical therapy. NONE OF THAT BELONGS ANYWHERE in the job hunt. If you are truly disabled, you know how to handle it. If you are not legally disabled, don't suggest that you might be.

  • "My network sucks."" Yea? Mine too. But here's the thing. Stop thinking that your network is just your close friends or close ex-coworkers. It might be the guy you chat with getting coffee every morning. Or the nice customer service rep you see at the store you want to work at. Or whoever. Everyone you interact with is potentially someone who can help you. Always say this: "If you know someone who's looking for someone, i'd appreciate it..." This puts no pressure on your network people. "IF" is key. Not "Do you" or "Tell me" or "Can you"...but "If"

OK, I have to bone up for a phone interview at 3pm. Don't wish me luck. I don't need it. Or prayers. And next time, I'll talk about background checks, past employers, etc.

STAY POSITIVE -- It matters

#jobsearch #howto #tips #strategy #applying

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shawna Lowrie
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over 6 months ago

i've been out of work for 4 months and have applied for just about every retail, customer service, cashier, stocker position out there including applieing for jobs i know that are out of my league or my education if not transportation may be an issue. and I have only had 2 job interviews during that time and still nothing. how do i get people to notice me and my hard work so im not sitting out of work for another 4 months and no job to show for it.

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