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Surveys
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Alyssa lindemann
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over 6 months ago

Don't accept a job if u have any doubts that you might not be able to finish the project

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Alyssa lindemann
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over 6 months ago

The flexibility with the schedule. Very easy to get the hang of and u pick what u want to do for work

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Calli Ivester
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over 6 months ago

Greetings, Jobcasers. After my most recent job rejection, despite several rounds of interviews, I'm starting to think that perhaps I should start looking in areas that are more suited to my strong points.

I enjoy working from home. Has anyone had any success with those survey ones where you pay to have their software installed and then earn money? Or is it smarter to actually look for a job that allows working from home? Thoughts/ideas?

#WorkFromHome #surveys

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Faith Oglesby
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over 6 months ago

I heard back from a recruiter from a local recruiting company and I was wondering why interviewees couldn’t be given a survey about the company they interview at as part of the whole hiring process? As long as individuals are told not to make derogatory or defaming comments abount the prospective company or interviewer, I think the survey could help recruiters to have feedback about each work environment and what culture works best for various personalities.

The one company I interviewed at recently had the right hours for me, but I wasn’t given the opportunity to hang my coat up and since my coat was bulky, I ended up sitting in front of the interviewer with my coat on. It was uncomfortable, but to me it seemed like a very “sterile” atmosphere. I was glad for the opportunity to interview, but I found out people ask if a person has the necessary energy to do certain jobs. Is referring to energy a way of discriminating against age or no?

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