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Secondchance
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Harley Blakeman ⚖️
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4 months ago

Business leaders are looking to HR for strategies and innovations to address pressing talent-related challenges. Fair-chance hiring is a strategic, innovative solution to improve talent acquisition, retention, engagement, and DEI efforts.

What is fair-chance hiring?

It is the practice of assessing job candidates with criminal records on a case-by-case basis. It typically involves the Nature-Time-Nature test, which considers the nature of the offense, how long ago it occurred, and the nature of the specific role.

Why should HR champion fair-chance hiring?

By championing fair-chance hiring for your organization, you are bringing a strategic, innovative solution that enables your HR/Talent and business teams to:

Access a massive talent pool: About 1 in 3 Americans has something on their background check, including 19 million have a felony conviction. Boost retention and engagement: Fair-chance hires tend to stay longer, while being just as (if not more) productive than other hires. Move the needle on diversity and equity: The criminal legal system disproportionately impacts groups underrepresented in many organizations, including people of color and people with disabilities. How can you mitigate risk?

Using Nature-Time-Nature, your organization avoids negligent hiring by thoughtfully assessing potential conflicts. Especially for larger organizations, it can be helpful to create a formal rubric (sometimes referred to as a Background Screen Matrix) for consistency. It would include role types, conviction types, and timeframe for consideration. Within the matrix, you would provide guidance for how to proceed for any given combination of Nature-Time-Nature.

How can you start making the case?

Despite the benefits, fair-chance hiring may not be an easy sell. For ‘social proof’, you can reference the Second Chance Business Coalition, which includes some of the country’s biggest employers. Seeing that companies like American Airlines, JP Morgan Chase, PayPal, and Procter & Gamble have publicly committed to fair-chance hiring shows that it’s good for business.

Final thought

Frankly, fair-chance hiring will not work unless HR is on board and driving the necessary changes. Within your organization, you and your teams are the key to making fair-chance hiring a reality and a success. #hiring #jobsearch #fairchance #secondchance

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Harley Blakeman ⚖️
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5 months ago

If you were recently released from jail or prison, it would be wise to review this survival check list before jumping into the job market.

You may have already taken care of some, if not all, of these - or you may have to spend the next month or two working them out. Below is a list of things that are critical to finding and maintaining most types of employment:

  • Social security card
  • State ID or driver's license
  • Email address
  • Phone number
  • Mailing address
  • Access to a computer and internet (Home, Library, etc.)
  • Reliable transportation (Bus Pass, Bicycle, Car, etc.)
  • Clothes to wear for job interviews and work
  • Checking account for direct deposit of paychecks
  • Identified support system (Family, A.A., Church, etc.)

Some of the above will be harder to obtain than others, such as a social security card or cell phone, so it is important that you ask for help where you need it. Show this check list to someone from your identified support system and let them know where you could use some help.

You should not postpone your job search until you have checked off the entire list, but rather work towards completing the list while looking for employment. It can be helpful to start with used clothes, public transportation, and prepaid cell phones to hold you over for 6-12 months.

Think of what you need to do to check off each item on the list. Make a to do list with names of people you need to talk to and places you need to visit. This can be a stressful and difficult process, so be patient and stay positive. If you stay focused, you will have the checklist completed sooner than you may think - and you'll be glad you got started today!

#fairchance #secondchance #advice

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Harley Blakeman ⚖️
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5 months ago

Interviewing with a felony is frustrating for many reasons. You want to be upfront and honest about your past, but you don’t want to eliminate your chances of getting the position. At Honest Jobs, our purpose is to minimize this stress throughout the hiring process and match you with second-chance employers who are open to accepting your situation.

It is important for you to understand how to explain your background in terms of the values you have gained and the lessons you have learned through your experiences with the criminal justice system. As long as you’re honest about your record and can prove to employers that you’ve turned your life around, many will give you a chance.

Here are tips on how to interview with a felony record:

  1. Be Honest

Unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to interviewing with a criminal background, since a lot depends on the type of crime and the employer interviewing you. However, we suggest being upfront and honest as soon as you have the opportunity to talk about your background. This approach takes more time, effort, and resilience, but getting hired after being honest with your interviewer lays the foundation for a solid reputation and career with the company. Additionally, most people will appreciate your honesty and the fact that you are working hard to overcome past mistakes.

  1. The C.O.D.C. Storyline

Following the C.O.D.C. storyline can help you explain your background resulting in a positive outcome.

C = Circumstances: What was your life like before the crime?

Explain what may have led to you committing a crime. There are many factors, such as depression, hard times, or hanging out with the wrong crowd that even people without a criminal record can often relate to. Understanding the circumstances can help your interviewer to see past the crime and focus more on your potential.

O = Ownership: Take responsibility for the crime and punishment.

After you have communicated where you were in life at the time of your offense, make sure you demonstrate taking responsibility for your actions. You want your interviewer to know that you recognize the importance of your punishment and any positive effects it had on your character.

D = Development: What have you learned from your mistakes?

Once you have explained how your punishment affected you, point out 3-4 things you have done/are doing to turn your life around. Your family, work, school, church, community, and personal passions are excellent topics to talk about. Do your best to relate these things to the job for which you are interviewing. For example, you could share how hard you've worked to rebuild your relationship with your family, and you are excited by the opportunity to be able to financially support them if hired.

C = Change: What actions you have taken to better yourself?

Summarize who you are now and what you have to offer. Highlight your personal mission and values to show that your actions are built on a solid foundation. The hiring decision often comes down to the candidate’s core values and personality. Also, remember to talk in terms of the job position you are applying for when explaining what skills and abilities you have.

  1. Follow the Employer’s Lead

After you have disclosed your background, some employers won’t ask for additional details about your criminal record, or they might only want to focus on job-related topics like the skills you gained during incarceration. If this is the case, be honest, but only share the details you feel are important for them to understand your situation. There's no need to overshare what happened in the past. The interview should focus on your skills and how you can contribute to the employer, rather than thoroughly explaining your offense. #secondchances #secondchance #criminalrecord # # #

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Charlie Brown
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5 months ago

If someone from California is trying to get their guard card through the bureau of security, Is it still possible to obtain one even though they have a pending case case but have not been convicted of a federal crime that allegedly occured in a different state? #secondchance #advice

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Jessica Horn
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over 6 months ago

I somehow got locked out of my previous account, don’t know if I got reported or what happened but after numerous emails with Jobcase I could never get back into it.

Anyway, I finally had to settle and take a burger flipping job at Five Guys. I absolutely hate it. I’m literally treated like a child.

I’m still looking for something that is work from home that does “second chance” background check or doesn’t look past 5-7 years. I’ve got recommendations from my probation officer. And I’m now on my THIRD low paying entry level job to show that I’m dependable, honest, and trustworthy.

I’m hoping someone remembers me from my previous account!

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PAULINE FOLEY

Hospitals are short staffed. So try your local hospital. Check their website for openings. Post resume on linked in. You can also see listings on Indeed.

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Sarah Lencioni

Im kind of a part timer but your advice is noted

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Michael Frash
Community Specialist
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Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

One of the first steps you should take is to consider what job you would be best at based on your interests, present skill set, previous experience or training, and long-term goal.

  • Do you enjoy building things? A construction job may be a great fit for you.
  • Enjoy cooking for friends or family? Why not transfer those skills into a position as a line cook, cafeteria worker, or a restaurant team member?
  • Were you once the go-to lawn mower in your neighborhood? Consider landscaping or groundskeeping!
  • Did you take part in a work program or assignment while incarcerated? That position could have imparted valuable skills that you can use to find your next paying job.

You’d be surprised how the skills you already have can easily translate into a fulfilling job.

After you have a good grasp of your strengths and interests, it’s time to start looking for open positions in your immediate or local area. CLICK HERE TO SEE WHERE YOU CAN GET SUPPORT IN FINDING A JOB.

#secondchance #jobsearch

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Fred Goff
CEO and Founder of Jobcase
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CEO and Founder of Jobcase
over 6 months ago

I wrote this 3 years ago. Someone just resurfaced it for me and I thought I'd do same for everyone - becuase theres a lot to learn from those that are overcoming some of the biggest mistakes.
#secondchance #mistakes #hope #motivation

https://www.jobcase.com/conversations/1cee231d-7318-5faf-895d-50e15194a174

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Toi Smith
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over 6 months ago

Does #secondchance have positions in the Chicagoland area? #secondchance

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Elyssa Duncan
Community Specialist
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Community Specialist
over 6 months ago

"Having a record reduces the likelihood of a job callback or offer by as much as 50 percent, according to the NAACP. In the land of the free, this is unacceptable. Those who paid their debt to society should not be subject to a vocational sentence of life-without-equal-opportunity."

I am so proud to share this article written by Jobcase CEO, @Fred Goff. In the article, Fred notes that one in three adults have a criminal record. This makes it extremely difficult, and at times, even impossible to find work. However, this can change if employers and job seekers work to overcome the stigma and recognize the benefits of giving individuals an opportunity for a #secondchance.

Check out this amazing read and let me know your thoughts below!

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