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Secondchance
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Rudolph Jones
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Looking for employment work very hard I keep a good pistive attitude and work we

I understand I did ten years mandatory in fla now I stay in ny I only been here 5 months put soooo many applications in haven't found one yet..

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Gina Robbins
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I try say I am innocent but still in probation. It is not easy pass background check for jobs. Try cosmetology/ barber Owner never check background check.

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Harley Blakeman
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over 6 months ago

I want to invite everyone to check out Honest Jobs, a national job board with over 1,400 fair-chance employers. This site helps people with criminal records find employment up to 8X faster! www.honestjobs.com

#fairchance #secondchance #criminalrecord #backgroundcheck

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Jackson Garza
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over 6 months ago

The stigma of a criminal record makes it tough to get back on track. Any success stories or tips on rebuilding a career? #SecondChance #CareerAfterConviction

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Jerilyn Brown
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over 6 months ago

Anyone who's been incarcerated for a fair amount of time knows that inmates tend to adapt the way they behave, think and communicate to their environment. Member @Scott Silvers posted a video in this group that made me think about something I don't think we've addressed before.

We've had a lot of posts that focused on best interview methods, navigating the challenges of job search, overcoming obstacles and barriers in our re-entry process, finding resources and providing insights about our own experiences.

Watching Scott's video reminded me of when I was an Addictions Counselor and would assess inmates preparing for re-entry to get them into an addiction treatment program. I often coached them on how to use appropriate language when communicating rather than using the vernacular and slang they adopted while incarcerated. Explaining to an interviewer how they were going to apply the lessons they learned while incarcerated in a way would be taken seriously is largely dependent on how they communicate those ideas. Learning to use proper English on your resume by looking at professional resume examples and using those as a template for your own resume is simple enough, but being able to communicate effectively with an interviewer maybe a whole different ball game.

First of all, using your given name rather than the moniker you used while inside will help you be taken more seriously. Nicknames, just like slang terms are not appropriate for job search. Using slang terms such as "appy", "let me get with" and "for real, for real" might make for interesting conversation around the water cooler but it won't get you the job. Because the way we've had to adapt our method of communication can be hard to shake it might benefit some to work with a language coach. Your Parole and Probation office may have resources available to help. If not, check with your local community center for job coaching.

The other issue observed in the video was the fact that "Always Teste" did not have a computer available in order to access and submit his applications. Your local library, Community Center and Employment Division should have computers available for public use and may have representatives or employees available to help you navigate websites and complete applications as well as guidance to develop a professional resume and cover letter.

It's hard enough for felons in re-entry to combat societal stereotypes and present themselves in the most positive light possible while seeking employment. Using proper English and good communication skills will help polish your applications, resume and presentation. If you have questions or need advice on best practices for job search let us know in this group. Be sure that you've completed your profile, including your location and biography section so we can better focus our efforts on the particular area and industry you are seeking work in.

If your language skills or lack of access to technology is a barrier in your job search efforts tell us about it and we'll do our best to get you moving in a positive direction. Just remember that no matter what the barrier is there are solutions and the members of the Jobcase Community and the Fair Chance to Succeed group are here to help. Giving up or reverting to old behaviors should never be considered an option

Here's the link to @Scott Silvers post:

Scott's Post

#resume #advice #secondchance #interview

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over 6 months ago

Do you think candidates should be allowed to interview for a second time upon request?

#Question #Round2 #Secondchance #Interviewprocess #jobsearch

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Balaji Arya
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over 6 months ago

Check out this video to explore some of the high paying jobs you can do with a record! Boon explains how to get various positions in industries like Customer Service, Hospitality, Construction and more!

He gives advice and instructions on navigating the interview and application process, such as how to explain your background and what positive qualities to mention. Boon also tells us how to make the highest hourly possible, starting at $18 and progressing up to $25 an hour!

What are the Industries and Jobs where you’ve found success applying as a felon?? Let us know in the comments section below!!

#Jobsearch #Interview #Resume #Advice #Aboutmyjob #Application #SecondChance

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Harley Blakeman ⚖️
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over 6 months ago

Business leaders are looking to HR for strategies and innovations to address pressing talent-related challenges. Fair-chance hiring is a strategic, innovative solution to improve talent acquisition, retention, engagement, and DEI efforts.

What is fair-chance hiring?

It is the practice of assessing job candidates with criminal records on a case-by-case basis. It typically involves the Nature-Time-Nature test, which considers the nature of the offense, how long ago it occurred, and the nature of the specific role.

Why should HR champion fair-chance hiring?

By championing fair-chance hiring for your organization, you are bringing a strategic, innovative solution that enables your HR/Talent and business teams to:

Access a massive talent pool: About 1 in 3 Americans has something on their background check, including 19 million have a felony conviction. Boost retention and engagement: Fair-chance hires tend to stay longer, while being just as (if not more) productive than other hires. Move the needle on diversity and equity: The criminal legal system disproportionately impacts groups underrepresented in many organizations, including people of color and people with disabilities. How can you mitigate risk?

Using Nature-Time-Nature, your organization avoids negligent hiring by thoughtfully assessing potential conflicts. Especially for larger organizations, it can be helpful to create a formal rubric (sometimes referred to as a Background Screen Matrix) for consistency. It would include role types, conviction types, and timeframe for consideration. Within the matrix, you would provide guidance for how to proceed for any given combination of Nature-Time-Nature.

How can you start making the case?

Despite the benefits, fair-chance hiring may not be an easy sell. For ‘social proof’, you can reference the Second Chance Business Coalition, which includes some of the country’s biggest employers. Seeing that companies like American Airlines, JP Morgan Chase, PayPal, and Procter & Gamble have publicly committed to fair-chance hiring shows that it’s good for business.

Final thought

Frankly, fair-chance hiring will not work unless HR is on board and driving the necessary changes. Within your organization, you and your teams are the key to making fair-chance hiring a reality and a success. #hiring #jobsearch #fairchance #secondchance

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Harley Blakeman ⚖️
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over 6 months ago

If you were recently released from jail or prison, it would be wise to review this survival check list before jumping into the job market.

You may have already taken care of some, if not all, of these - or you may have to spend the next month or two working them out. Below is a list of things that are critical to finding and maintaining most types of employment:

  • Social security card
  • State ID or driver's license
  • Email address
  • Phone number
  • Mailing address
  • Access to a computer and internet (Home, Library, etc.)
  • Reliable transportation (Bus Pass, Bicycle, Car, etc.)
  • Clothes to wear for job interviews and work
  • Checking account for direct deposit of paychecks
  • Identified support system (Family, A.A., Church, etc.)

Some of the above will be harder to obtain than others, such as a social security card or cell phone, so it is important that you ask for help where you need it. Show this check list to someone from your identified support system and let them know where you could use some help.

You should not postpone your job search until you have checked off the entire list, but rather work towards completing the list while looking for employment. It can be helpful to start with used clothes, public transportation, and prepaid cell phones to hold you over for 6-12 months.

Think of what you need to do to check off each item on the list. Make a to do list with names of people you need to talk to and places you need to visit. This can be a stressful and difficult process, so be patient and stay positive. If you stay focused, you will have the checklist completed sooner than you may think - and you'll be glad you got started today!

#fairchance #secondchance #advice

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Harley Blakeman ⚖️
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over 6 months ago

Interviewing with a felony is frustrating for many reasons. You want to be upfront and honest about your past, but you don’t want to eliminate your chances of getting the position. At Honest Jobs, our purpose is to minimize this stress throughout the hiring process and match you with second-chance employers who are open to accepting your situation.

It is important for you to understand how to explain your background in terms of the values you have gained and the lessons you have learned through your experiences with the criminal justice system. As long as you’re honest about your record and can prove to employers that you’ve turned your life around, many will give you a chance.

Here are tips on how to interview with a felony record:

  1. Be Honest

Unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to interviewing with a criminal background, since a lot depends on the type of crime and the employer interviewing you. However, we suggest being upfront and honest as soon as you have the opportunity to talk about your background. This approach takes more time, effort, and resilience, but getting hired after being honest with your interviewer lays the foundation for a solid reputation and career with the company. Additionally, most people will appreciate your honesty and the fact that you are working hard to overcome past mistakes.

  1. The C.O.D.C. Storyline

Following the C.O.D.C. storyline can help you explain your background resulting in a positive outcome.

C = Circumstances: What was your life like before the crime?

Explain what may have led to you committing a crime. There are many factors, such as depression, hard times, or hanging out with the wrong crowd that even people without a criminal record can often relate to. Understanding the circumstances can help your interviewer to see past the crime and focus more on your potential.

O = Ownership: Take responsibility for the crime and punishment.

After you have communicated where you were in life at the time of your offense, make sure you demonstrate taking responsibility for your actions. You want your interviewer to know that you recognize the importance of your punishment and any positive effects it had on your character.

D = Development: What have you learned from your mistakes?

Once you have explained how your punishment affected you, point out 3-4 things you have done/are doing to turn your life around. Your family, work, school, church, community, and personal passions are excellent topics to talk about. Do your best to relate these things to the job for which you are interviewing. For example, you could share how hard you've worked to rebuild your relationship with your family, and you are excited by the opportunity to be able to financially support them if hired.

C = Change: What actions you have taken to better yourself?

Summarize who you are now and what you have to offer. Highlight your personal mission and values to show that your actions are built on a solid foundation. The hiring decision often comes down to the candidate’s core values and personality. Also, remember to talk in terms of the job position you are applying for when explaining what skills and abilities you have.

  1. Follow the Employer’s Lead

After you have disclosed your background, some employers won’t ask for additional details about your criminal record, or they might only want to focus on job-related topics like the skills you gained during incarceration. If this is the case, be honest, but only share the details you feel are important for them to understand your situation. There's no need to overshare what happened in the past. The interview should focus on your skills and how you can contribute to the employer, rather than thoroughly explaining your offense. #secondchances #secondchance #criminalrecord # # #

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Charlie Brown
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over 6 months ago

If someone from California is trying to get their guard card through the bureau of security, Is it still possible to obtain one even though they have a pending case case but have not been convicted of a federal crime that allegedly occured in a different state? #secondchance #advice

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