#
Nobshiringadvice
Share Topic
Report Content
Interested in this topic? Be the first to follow.
Ask a question
Sort by:
Jerilyn Brown
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

As we all know there is a trend occurring in the hiring market that is seeming to focus more on the soft skills that candidates possess than their academic education and professional qualifications. You know, Hard Skills are your technical expertise and Soft Skills are how you behave & interact with others. It appears that hiring managers are more often focusing on finding candidates who possess a repertoire of soft skills that make them a good fit for leadership roles as well as their company culture.

These days, it takes more than confidence and personality to make you a standout candidate. Interviews have always included behavioral questions, however, these types of questions are now more important for candidates to be aware of. If you are seeking a job role that exposes you to team or consumer interactions you need this information in your job search toolbox. It is invaluable.

@Laura Thebodeau just posted about Soft Skills and @Steven Ransom recently posted about Interview Introductions and it got me thinking about an article I had saved previously because as a hiring manager, I used these very same questions to help format my interviews with prospective employees in Hospitality. This article focuses on what is known as the STAR method and it can be incredibly useful to help job seekers answer some of the common behavioral interview questions they will surely have to answer.

I recommend using this method to identify experiences you've had in your job and solidify your answers using real life examples. Doing so will improve your confidence and enhance your ability to respond to behavioral questions without losing your composure. Check out this terrific article & let me know what you think in the comments 👍

STAR

Be sure to read Laura's and Steve's posts as well as they go hand in hand on this topic. Let us know in the comments about your experiences and thoughts on this. We'd love to have your input and insights!

Laura's post

Steve's post

#interview #hiringnews #hiringtrends #inspiration #motivation #watercoolertopics #nobshiringadvice

13
3 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Steven Ransom
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

👨‍🏫 A Teachable Moment:

🕵️‍♀️ I posted this video the Jobcase member Charles Jeffery has since (as of 12.06.2020 on or about 4:30 - 5:00 AM PST) removed his name from my inbox.

Here's the conversation between us:

  • Dec 4 at 8:39 AM PST: Charles Jeffery says: Hello I am Charles Jeffery, I'm an HR Recruiter from Suncorp. Are you still looking for a Job?

  • Dec 5 at 4:36 AM PST: Me: Hello Mr. Jeffery, may I ask how long have you been associated with Suncorp and where is its base of operation?

  • Dec 5 at 7:11 AM PST: Charles Jeffery says: I have been associated with Suncorp for 20 years and its base of operation in Australia

Note: I really could not engage in this conversation, because I was on my way to work. Just a quick check of my messages on Dec 5.

  • Dec 6 at 4:24 AM PST: Me: What are the top skills needed? and What is the company culture like? 4:28 PST: Me: And also, does the company have a remote work policy?

Note: Checking other email messages from my Gmail account.

Then I went back to check for his response and to my amazement, he changed his name to "A fellow Jobcaser." 🤔😮 It is wired how when I asked question(s) to him he, in turn, removed his name from the communication (see: video and screenshot in the reply/answer. 😀

In this video an inbox message, Mr.Jeffery claims that he has been associated with Suncorp for 20 years as an HR Recruiter, 🕵️‍♀️ upon my research I did not find any information as to his employment i.e, HR Recruiter.. and/or any association with Suncorp. I ask you; Am I wrong for asking him any questions?

This just goes to show that there are a lot of fake people who try to trick or scheme people for information.

Note: video may be a little fussy ever at full-screen. (But you can view the conversation above.↑).

@Charles Jeffery aka HR Recruiter... I don't like to respond to people who do not show their face or that does not have a profile, or who speak and act so as to make it appear that something is the case when in fact it is not, or not really what they are represented as being; i.e. used in a game of deception, having no factual basis; just a false representation. 👎👋bye, bye!

#NoBSHiringAdvice

7
2 Answers
Like
Answer
Share
See all answers
Steven Ransom
Bullet point
Follow
Top Answer
1 person found this answer helpful

🕵️‍♀️ I'm not too sure but this may be a Possible Scheme 😂🤣😂🤣 ... ijs click the pic and see how he removed his name and added "A fellow Jobcaser", but in the video, you can see the name, Charles Jeffery and you see that the two others have not changed at all. I can not change incoming messages. Oh boy! 😂🤣😂🤣

4y
1
Reply
1 Marked Helpful
Steven Ransom
Bullet point
Follow

👨‍🏫 A Teachable Moment: (continue...)

For many job seekers, nothing’s more frustrating than the words, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.”

What if you don’t know anyone? Or simply didn’t recognize the importance of networking until recently.

It isn’t impossible, and you don’t have to be obnoxious to get in front of the right people. In fact, there’s an entire method for introducing yourself to people you’ve never met but would like to know. It’s called sending a Letter of Introduction.

What is a Letter Introduction? It’s a piece of correspondence introducing yourself to someone asking to make their acquaintance and if they’re willing, help you find a job opportunity or meet other people in your desired network. They’re a polite way of getting your name in front of people without infringing on their time.

While we’re on the topic, let’s discuss what a letter of introduction is not. An introduction letter is not your resume, it’s not a cover letter, and it’s not a short story detailing your early life, dreams, and ambitions.

Rather, it’s a brief, clear, and concise explanation of who you are (i.e. a recent graduate, an experienced web designer) and why you are writing. This reason could be that you’re looking for a job or you’re hoping to chat with them to gain some insight into the industry you wish to enter.

Putting It All Together A letter of the introduction allows you to even the playing field when it comes to the game of “who knows who”.

If you can dedicate time to send a letter (or email) of introduction each week to people you’d like to meet, you’re guaranteed a certain percentage replying back – so long as you don’t simply cut and paste the same letter for everyone.

Tip: Whether it’s to land a new job or break into a new industry, and just networking take the advantage of the power of introductory letters. 🤝

See the example below ↓ click for fullscreen

4y
Mark As Helpful
Reply
Add
Hidden
Steven Ransom
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

Today's video on job search advice for over 50-year-olds! Let's be honest, there are biases against older workers. Anyone who tells you otherwise is flat out lying. Even so, that doesn't mean it's hopeless. We just need to plan a bit better and recognize where and how to take advantage of our more vast experience.

Check out today's video for tips on the job search itself, resume writing, and interviewing. Together, this job search advice for over 50-year-olds will get you to where you want to go!

How to land a great job when you are over 50

#stressful #interview #noBSHiringAdvice

2
Like
Comment
Share