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Michael Carvalho
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over 6 months ago

🌟 Embracing Growth Beyond Comfort: Exploring New Horizons in Job Applications 🌟

Are you ready to take your career to new heights? It's time to break free from the confines of your comfort zone and embark on an exhilarating journey of personal and professional growth. When it comes to applying for jobs, stepping outside your comfort zone can be the key that unlocks doors to exciting opportunities. So, let's dive in and discover the power of pushing boundaries and expanding your horizons!

#GrowthMindset #CareerDevelopment #JobSearch #BeyondComfortZone #ProfessionalGrowth #NewOpportunities #EmbraceChange

1️⃣ Unleash Your Potential: Growth often lies just beyond the borders of our comfort zone. By venturing outside familiar territories, you challenge yourself to learn and adapt to new experiences, helping you discover hidden talents and strengths you never knew you had. Embrace the unknown and trust in your ability to rise to the occasion.

2️⃣ Broaden Your Skill Set: Stepping outside your comfort zone exposes you to different industries, roles, and responsibilities. This presents a unique opportunity to broaden your skill set and gain diverse experiences that can make you a well-rounded candidate. Adaptability and versatility are highly valued attributes in today's dynamic job market.

3️⃣ Embrace Learning Opportunities: Applying for jobs that push you beyond your comfort zone opens doors to continuous learning. Whether it's pursuing new certifications, attending workshops, or acquiring additional qualifications, every step outside your comfort zone presents a chance to enhance your knowledge and expertise.

4️⃣ Networking Magic: Venturing beyond your comfort zone encourages you to connect with people from diverse backgrounds, industries, and perspectives. Engaging with new networks expands your circle of influence, exposes you to fresh perspectives, and opens doors to unforeseen collaborations and mentorship opportunities.

5️⃣ Cultivate Resilience: Growth often comes hand in hand with challenges and setbacks. By stretching your boundaries during the job search process, you cultivate resilience and develop the ability to bounce back from rejection or failure. Each experience outside your comfort zone strengthens your character and equips you with invaluable life skills.

6️⃣ Discover Your Passion: Stepping into uncharted territory allows you to explore new passions and interests. It's an opportunity to align your career with your true calling and find fulfillment in what you do. Remember, the greatest achievements often lie on the other side of fear.

So, as you embark on your job search journey, remember to venture outside your comfort zone. Embrace the unfamiliar, challenge yourself, and grow into the best version of yourself. Unleash your potential, acquire new skills, and unlock doors to a world of exciting opportunities. Your dream job may be waiting just beyond your comfort zone!

#StepOutsideComfortZone #EmbraceNewChallenges #CareerSuccess #PersonalGrowth #DreamJobAwaits #ProfessionalJourney #JobSearchStrategies #motivation #hiringnews #jobsearch #advice

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Denise Alfonso
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over 6 months ago

I went to school knowing I wanted to study science but not sure what I wanted to do with that. As a kid I mixed shampoo bottles and made flower infused "creations", lined up my stuffed animals for school, played "check up" with my siblings and dolls, studied "wildlife" on my high-tech "binoculars" (read: looked at my stuffed animals through two empty toilet paper rolls taped together), and annoyed my parents asking for math problems to do. The other kids thought I was weird, but that's a story for a different post. Eventually, I went down the Chemistry route and did lab research, thought about becoming a doctor, volunteered as an after-school tutor.

After a short stint as a doctoral student, I became a teacher. Part of my doctoral program involved teaching college students and I realized that it was the most rewarding part of my day (as much as I liked mixing chemicals and watching them change colors). I thought working with kids and teaching them about how atoms and molecules make up the world around us was the funnest job on the planet. And I loved it! But four years in, I started to feel like something was missing.

I missed research and experiments. I missed thinking about new problems in mathematical terms. I researched different career paths and settled on the idea that I wanted to become a Data Scientist. You run experiments! Work with data! Math! But I had one problem....I had no business experience and I had never worked with a programming language before. Sure, I once knew my math and statistics, but it had been years since I had used more than what was necessary to teach high school and I'd never worked with the massive data sets that are becoming so common in today's rapidly changing digital landscape.

So I came up with a plan...sort of. I talked to tons of people. Friends, friends of friends, people connected to coworkers, complete strangers who I cold-emailed or messaged on job sites (I even cold-called a few people and let me tell you, for a millennial, that is TERRIFYING). And I learned that what I wanted to do wasn't impossible. I signed up for free classes online, checked out textbooks from the library, went to data science meet ups around the city. Eventually I started working on a few small-scale projects and applying for jobs. There were a looooot of jobs I never heard back from. Who was going to hire a teacher with no "relevant" experience? But I called the hiring managers, talked to all the people who rejected me, and learned a lot!

It wasn't easy. It took me at least a year while working a full time job to take these classes and apply for jobs. I left my job at an amazing school with awesome coworkers at the end of the school year so I could work on finding a new job full time. I was scared! I was giving up something amazing for uncertainty! And all that even though I knew I was lucky to have savings that let me be unemployed for a bit and a family I could go back to should I run out of money.

Four months later, after a summer of constant rejections (but some very useful conversations with the very people who turned me down!), I landed three final-round interviews, two offers, and a job at the kick-ass company I chose to work at.

#JobSearchStrategies #Stressful #Motivation #unemployed #careerchange #learning #education

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Connor Noon
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over 6 months ago

Imagine my surprise when I received a call on a Wednesday morning that the job I had moved to a new state for just disappeared (3 days before my start date).

I accepted a job offer to join a company in Boston, MA. The opportunity was exciting, but also a leap of faith. I knew moving to Boston from New Jersey meant leaving behind friends, family, and a great employer. I knew there were risks to joining a smaller company, but thought I could eliminate them by proving my value on-the-job. I never got the chance.

So I started a new job search unemployed. Here are the key things I learned along the way:

1.) Use your support system. I called family and friends daily to socialize and vent (job searching can be lonely!). I subletted my apartment and moved in with my girlfriend for additional support. I reached out to people I had gone to school with or worked for in the past. And I asked them to help introduce me to others who might be sympathetic to my circumstances & search. I was fortunate and by the end, 3 people had committed their time to supporting my job search.

2.) For me, creating structure and getting out of the house was key. I found a few cafes near me that I liked and worked at them for about a typical work day. I'd walk my girlfriend to work as a forcing mechanism to get moving each morning.

3.) Finding something else to advance on! My job search was turbulent. There were bumps, highs, and lows. Without much else going on, its hard not to ride the bumps and become frustrated/exhausted. I found that re-devoting my self to fitness and guitar practice were healthy ways to feel like I was progressing, even if my job search wasn't

After 3 months of job searching, I accepted a role with Jobcase. Ever since, I've been fortunate to be able to support and help Jobcase members find jobs and opportunities, which has been more fulfilling than anything else I've done in my professional life. I know that I may be uniquely fortunate to have the support network I had to help navigate my job loss, but sincerely hope my learnings are helpful for you fellow Jobcasers!

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Lyea Douglas
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over 6 months ago

I feel I have dug myself into a hole. I worked as a senior client services administrator at a wealth management company until late 2013.. my 13 year old daughter tragically ended her life and because of the grief, despair, depression and anxiety I was unable to continue in an office environment. Around a year later, I was finally able to lift my head up out of the darkness and started bartending at two different places. I'm wanting to get back into administration but feel my being a bartender for the past 4 years gets my resume thrown right into the NO pile. Any suggestions? Thank you for reading.

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Gage Cherry
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over 6 months ago

Hey Jobcasers,

I just want to talk about something that I feel isn't really understood by a lot of people looking for their next employment opportunity. It's a simple idea, but it may seem radical, even contradictory to everything we've been taught: Opportunity isn't scarce.

You may be thinking that I'm a fool and that's a valid reaction, but just listen to what I have to say. Economically speaking, everything from our allotment of time on Earth to the number of jobs on the market is scarce and that's not what I'm disputing. I'm disputing the idea that we're limited in opportunities by the field we're in.

I've seen it frequently that a lot of highly qualified people are unable to find work in their field, sometimes due to no fault of their own.

Most people say keep looking, keep looking, keep looking, you'll break in somehow.

I disagree.

Quit looking for work in your field if you can't find it.

Start looking for work in an adjoining field or look for a lower-level position. Let me give an example:

You're 22 years old, you've got a BBA in Operations Management, and no work experience.

You're not finding much in the way of Management-level positions in Supply Chain Management.

So you've got two choices: Either look for something in an adjoining field or look for a lower-level position.

So let's say you do both, because you're a proactive go-getter hungry to cut your teeth in the workforce and you have two positions available:

I. Purchasing Assistant - You'd be in Supply Chain Management, but at the bottom rung of the ladder.

II. Account Manager - You'd be in the Sales Department and also at the bottom rung of the ladder.

So which do you choose?

It really depends on what you're looking for. With the former, you're going to refine and hone your skills in Operations and eventually move up from Purchasing Assistant into more senior roles. With the latter, you're going to diversify your skillset and learn how to handle clients and to generate revenue for the company.

Whoever you are, wherever you are in your professional career, you can always learn more and while there is a scarcity of jobs in the world (especially in single fields when we target them), we can always learn from whatever employment opportunity we currently are engaged in.

I say this as someone who has worked Retail and Hospitality and is looking to move into Human Resources. One may think that my previous work experience is irrelevant and while it's true that it's highly unlikely I'll be offering my advice on wine pairings in a professional setting once I complete the transition, that doesn't mean that my time was wasted. It was just utilized in a different way and it offered me different opportunities to learn and develop myself.

Don't ever be afraid to humble yourself and start at the bottom of a field you have no experience in (even if you have a degree in it) and equally so, don't ever be afraid to explore new opportunities to diversify your skillset and develop new lenses through which to look at problems you're facing and will face in the future.

Opportunity is the one thing I can say isn't scarce, as long as we're humble enough to look for it even in places we wouldn't otherwise give a second thought.

Thanks for reading,

Gage Cherry

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over 6 months ago

Okay, here's the deal. Please instead of going on multiple websites or spending countless hours online, drive to find locations that can suit your needs.

Write a list of your skill set and then determine what you like to do best. Spend time out, venturing in areas that you have never gone to and eventually, even accidentally, perhaps you might find something unexpected.

So for example, I had initially applied online to several locations. It didn't work. So I changed my strategy, I actually went to places, I even went as far as places in the Carolinas, even further south and I determined all of the various possibilities. I also studied the areas and mission statements of places of employment alongside the cultures. For example, I snowboard, so I looked into places that I would be able to snowboard and work simultaneously. I am a registered nurse, I physically drive to so many hospitals all over the US. I am also and have been in management, I don't feel like being in management so I chose not to pursue those things. I am also a highly educated teacher, I decided that because teachers don't get the recognition coupled by the disparity in both literacy and other factors that I didn't want to do that at this current time. I looked into so many things, even being a nanny, if I wanted to pursue my doctorate degree.

After gathering information and after being offered different positions, I was able to select what was best.

It is Not always about how much a company is going to pay an employee. Please remember that businesses are hiring someone that they feel is an investment. If you owned a company, wouldn't you do the same?

So therefore this is my advice, take it or leave it...(my advice).... it is imperative that you select the best area that is suitable for you and your situation. If you find yourself in this website all too much while looking for encouragement, you are wasting time when it could be productive.

If I was an owner of a profitable business, and if I had to select prospective employees, do you honestly think I am going to make a decision or judgement call on what all you people are saying or complaining about? Yes. I can tell you right now, those of you that choose to swear and make negative comments, I would not hire at all.

Do you think as an owner, that I would want to employ an individual who cannot articulate something that's important? That's obvious once again. No, I personally would not, not if I was looking for someone to be the first person greeting my customers in the morning.

If I was hiring laborers for a construction company, I want to know the skill set and how efficient and how well someone calculated math appropriately.

Each position requires a specific skill set and honestly no employer that I know want to hire the complainer or the person that gossips or the person that can be someone who has been involved with sexual harassment or those that have stalked other employees. Why would a company want that? The point is that they wouldn't.

Please don't swear on this website, it's very unprofessional. Please instead of saying that you've applied to hundreds of places and are getting discouraged, go to these places instead of wasting time on this forum.

If you are out of work, look for volunteer opportunities OR if you are fortunate enough apply for financial aid or grants to go back and further your education, look into other schools besides colleges and universities if you are able to do so. Other schools such as two year colleges have the same professional teachers as a four year university. Technical schools such as the technical high schools offer skilled training and cost 1/2 or 3/4 the amount of other privately owned corporations paying into our state.

If there is a need to ask for advice, sometimes it can be more effective personally speaking to someone rather than posting on this forum.

I wish everyone the best of luck on their job search, however, always keep in your brain that companies do not want to hire negative people, they also don't want to hire people that also throw their "boss" under the table. That in itself is 100 percent unprofessional.

If your not getting a job, it's NOT YOU PERSONALLY, the fact is that you haven't looked into other ways of finding the right place to work.

Good luck! Please don't bother commenting on my comment because I am getting off this website as soon as I have the availability to do so. Thanks and have a nice day everyone!

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Brian McBride
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over 6 months ago

Need a job? Great now do your home work. A good job placement takes effort . Polish that resume, post on reputable sites that will work in your skill set and give you options. Looking for work is a selling exersize in selling yourself. With a poor or dismal marketing plan, your not going to get calls. Presentation and multiple postings on different web sites and good ol fasion Foot work is what it will take. Get off your duff and do the work and you will earn the PRIVILEGE to work. It's not a right! You have to earn it !

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