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Claudia Wooley
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This is really directed towards Human Resources personnel or the actual people interviewing for a department/position. After an interview that seemingly went well (maybe an hour long interview) what is the protocol for following up? Do applicants send an email, call the interviewer or what is suggested? As an applicant, it would be nice to receive something saying the position has been filled, or if you are atill interviewing applicants. A call is not necessary, but a standard letter from HR would suffice. It's discouraging to continue to see the job posted and no response. #humanresources #interview #followup #application #hiringprocess

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Veronica Jefferson
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Founder Photographer at The Pisces Effect

Claudia,

HR 411: As someone with HR experience, here’s is something to keep in mind: A common practice would be to email or mail your interviewer(s) a note to thank them for meeting with you and highlight key points as to how and why you would be a great fit for the role, and an addition to the company. Ultimately, touching up on the key points to remind them of what topics were important to you during your meeting with them.

However, doing this may sometimes be challenging or impossible when many candidates have no contact information to reach the interviewer(s), as most companies use ATS (applicant tracking systems) to communicate generated responses specifically to prevent applicants from flooding a company or interviewers inbox post-interview.

With that said, a proactive thing you can do when interviewing with a company is to ask the interviewer for their best source of contact (direct email or phone) should you have any questions or want to reach out to them regarding your applicancy post-interview. Be sure to ask them if it’s okay to contact them with any questions or concerns, etc., don’t assume you can. If you are working with a recruiter, you’ll want to send your note to the recruiter and request they forward that note to the hiring manager/interviewer as they are the “connection” between you and the company.

POSITION REPOST: Many companies will not tell applicants this but whenever you see a position reposted can mean several things: 1. The company needs to keep the position reposted to cover themselves from any anti-discriminatory laws (favoritism). 2. The company wasn’t satisfied with the pool of candidates they received (or interviewed) so they want to “shop around” for more. 3. The company keeps or reposts the position online because they may have hired internally or made an offer to someone and have to wait for the onboarding/hiring to be completed before they can either reject past applicants via email or close the job listing. AND/OR 4. The company's chosen applicant did not work out and they need to go through the interview process again – from the beginning.

But, seeing a position reposted isn’t always a bad thing. It may be positive insight for you, as it could reveal that the company may not be “good”, or has a high turnover that you don’t know about, or has a toxic environment resulting in the company having to constantly repost the position. There is always a reason why things happen the way they do, and time will reveal that reason sooner or later. So whenever you see a position reposted, know that it may not have anything to do with you. This is why the saying “it’s them, not you.” exists. Take any silent rejections as a sign that you are meant for something else, meant to be somewhere else. It will help you better process rejections going forward.

Best.

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Annette Burton
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Maientenance at Efro Staffing

Don't go overboard

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Janice Reed
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I think it depends on the size and capacity of the companies you apply to. Some companies even outsource their hiring process to outside agencies. Here are some tips on how to follow up with employers after an interview. I hope it helps. Let us know how your job search is going so far and how we can support you!

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Rose Hernandez
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Server at Fogo De Chao Brazilian Steakhouse

I usually send a Thank You email after all my interviews, within 24 hrs after. then if I haven't heard back within 2 weeks I send another email to inquire about the status of my application. If nothing, I just move on. Some places reach out with rejections others don't.

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Annette Burton
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Maientenance at Efro Staffing

Keep it brief and professional

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