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Tara Buchanan
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over 6 months ago

I'm an IT professional by trade. I left my last job due to a military move. I couldn't find work in the new location because I didn't fit the demographic (not a local, and too qualified). I decided I'd be a stay at home mom and focus on my college studies instead. Three years later, we are back in the US, and I'm having a really hard time finding employment. I've applied to lots of opportunities, even entry level ones - and no luck so far. It makes me wonder if there are discrepancies in my background check (which would surprise me), or previous employers are giving poor reviews (I doubt it because I left on good terms).. is it something I'm doing wrong? Or did I shoot myself in the foot three years ago when I decided to care for my kids instead of work? I don't know.

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Jay Walk
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over 6 months ago

I had a recent interview with a store that was similar to my previous job. The entire interview circulated around that particular job. Mind you it’s in the retail business and My work history is full of retail. But they literally only asked about that job in particular. About the sales my old job used to run, how often they changed sales, what products did they have, what & how they cooked the products. Eventually, I gave up and said no thank you. Because out of all my interviews I’ve had before I’ve never had a job so curious about another job. Maybe I’m over thinking it? But they literally weren’t even trying to be discreet about it. And I believe their mind was already made up about not hiring me because they had “10 other interviews”. It felt more of an interrogation than an interview.

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Natalie Stuart
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over 6 months ago

I'm looking for any advice on what to tell new employers when I'm moving on from a supervisor who wasn't happy with me. Here's my story: I have had 4 different jobs and usually had excellent annual reviews from past supervisors. However, my most recent supervisor was a nightmare. She didn't make expectations clear and I didn't receive proper training, but then my supervisor started micromanaging everything and nothing was ever good enough for her (she even went so far as to smack my hand one day and yell "no!" when she didn't approve of how I handled something), gossiping and spreading rumors about me to a couple co-workers of mine that she was close to, and gave me by far the worst performance review I have ever received (which was mostly lies, and I have evidence of emails, reports, etc...to prove it). Anyway, this job was literally making me ill. I was jittery, hardly eating, having panic attacks, and not sleeping. I ended up having to quit without having a new job lined up to prevent a complete nervous breakdown. So...my question now is what do I tell new potential employers who might call my most recent job to confirm my work history? Do I specifically tell them to call other past supervisors instead, even though they aren't the most recent? Do I explain that my last supervisor and I had a personality conflict? Do I not mention anything and hope for the best? What would you guys do? I'm so ready to be done with this nightmare and move on to something new. Please help!

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renee Lavoie
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over 6 months ago

I finally think a job may pop up, @ 264 app's 4 mo. I had my business for 20 yrs. now of course I need ref. all the stores that I picked up appliances are close! And I am living in another state! What am I going to do? Any advice I'm a CDL B driver

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Ellen Ferrell
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over 6 months ago

I just received an amazing job offer to run errands and care for a cancer patient's dog for $350 a week while they recover from surgery since I have around 12 years experience for caring for animals, the problem is they want my resume, which normally wouldn't be one but all my experience with those animals I owned. I've had iguanas, birds, rabbits, chickens, cats, dogs, mice, fish, and once a boa constrictor 7 feet long, it's great experience but since they were all my own animals I don't have any references to give so now I'm worried since I really need the job but I feel I'm already screwed. Any help from someone who's done this before?

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Dennis Costea Jr.
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over 6 months ago

One thing I recommend is to put all job and work related facts down in a Windows 'Notepad', 'Wordpad' or Microsoft Word file ('.doc', or '.docx') and save this file on your computer, a portable Flash drive (Thumb drive) and upload it to a Google Docs account or similar [private] online storage location.

** Make sure to include past physical addresses (where you lived) and the 'Move-in', 'Move-out' dates. ** List your past employers and remember to specify '[Employer name] (direct hire)', '[Employer name] (Temporary contractor)' or '[Employer name] 1099 contractor' because these characterize the nature of the professional relationship. ** Create a list of professional references, including the dates known 'From' and 'To' (or Present, if still known), e-mail them and ASK permission to mention each one as a Professional reference and KEEP TRACK of the Date you e-mailed them and the date they replied. As your Professional reference "age" try and update the contact information and keep the lines of communication open. If they change companies, you will need to know this fact. ** ASK for previous managers, supervisors and associates (same level co-workers) to provide a 'Recommendation' paragraph or two for you IF they are on the LinkedIn.com social networking platform. ** If you do not have a presence on LinkedIn.com, get one now! The basic level of account if FREE!

A shortened version of these 'Lists' should be kept on your Smartphone's 'Memo' App because not all employers will allow candidates to plug-in a Thumb drive or access online Docs while completing an application. In the case of limited use of previously prepared files, candidates may be able to 'Open' a file on their Smartphone and use the list(s) to insure multiple employers get the 'Same picture' of you over time. I believe it is harmful to a candidate's chances if they apply for a job in January with one set of facts, and then re-apply in August or September with a different set of facts; this serves to characterize the candidate's ability to pay attention to details and recall facts.

All this will give you access to these facts at a moment's notice and allow you to Cut & Paste them into any online application or separate resume required as part of a job application. It is time to begin learning how to 'Outsmart, outwit and outplay' your employment competition! Having quick and easy access to all of your Professional background details will literally save dozens of steps and HUNDREDS of hours in the employment candidacy process!

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Theresa Farage
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over 6 months ago

I am beyond angry again. I was offered an interview for a great position. I received an email today stating they had to rescind the offer for interview because she contacted one of my employers and they did not give me a positive review. I know one of my employers will not give me a positive review because I left the position with very little notice and she was a horrible boss to work for. This is why I have references to contact. When did potential employers start contacting your past employers without your consent .interview was all lined up for tomorrow. then she sends me an email rescinding the offer. I wish I knew who it was because isn't it against the law to give a bad review unless you really did something bad and honestly, I didn't do anything wrong when I worked there. but I did not give her notice when I left cuz she was a horrible boss, that's why I left for a new job,

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Gregory Richardson
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over 6 months ago

I had a weird one today. I was told i was the only one being considered for a position. The interview seemed to go very well. The HR manager said he'd be putting together an offer package and sending it over by weeks end. Instead what I get today is an email saying "we've decided to open it up to other applicants. You're qualified, but I dont have any positive feedback for reasons they chose this." The problem comes in where my ex significant other is the president of the company I was just terminated from. I was fired for a very bogus reason..the real reason is our personal relationship ended with animosity on her part. NY is an at will state, so there's nothing i can say. Or is there?

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Beverly Parmely
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over 6 months ago

Get resources and use them! Depends on the policy you actually broke. When interviewing someone they can't ask rite aid anything but yes or no questions. So they will ask if your rehireable. And just be honest about it and maybe them love you and trust you. Or don't use rite aid as reference or experience. It sucks if it's alot of retail experience. Never fear Christmas season is near! Retail needs that holiday cheer! Good luck. Keep smiling. You'll find the perfect job.

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Bridget Cullen
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over 6 months ago

I live in California and employers 9-10 times will not give any kind of reference. Due to lawsuits they will confirm dates of employment, pay rate and position. I have found a way around this by exchanging letters with coworkers when you leave. You write them one and they do one for you. Often they have you write one for them to sign. This way it is a character reference as well.

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