#
Businessanalysis
Share Topic
Report Content
Interested in this topic? Be the first to follow.
Ask a question
Sort by:
Beverly Costello
Bullet point
Follow
about 2 months ago

Highly Skilled Professional who recently relocated to Newport News seeking #Administrative or #ExecutiveAssistant position. Over 20 years of solid work experience. Reliable, hard working team player. Sure to be an asset to any employer! Prior experience in #ProjectManagement #BusinessAnalysis #RiskManagement #PublicRelations #Audit #Supervisor #EmergencyPreparedness #BusinessContinuity and much more. Contact me for resume if you have an ideal position in mind. Thank you! Happy Easter!

Like
Comment
Share
Awais Khan
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

Outsourcing decisions need to be taken in order to accomplish your business needs in the most efficient manner.

It doesn't mean you're incapable of handling your needs in-house.

It means you're smart enough to recognise your business needs and are able to make the right call.

#business #b2cleadgeneration #businessandmanagement #businessanalysis

Like
Comment
Share
Hidden
Phyllis A. Dunn
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

There is a Right and Wrong Way to do Business Analysis Are your goals aligned with your Information Architectures?

IT efforts have one objective—to support the defined goals of an organization. This subjective statement is; however, only the beginning. Ideally, IT priorities and developmental processes are aligned—with the organizational strategy—in a systematic way. This ensures maximum support to the organization—and has a carry over to high-level goals, strategies, mission, and vision. This can be achieved by using the information architecture, which connects business policy and planning and IT project management. Organizational Goals
A goal is an observable and measurable end that is achieved in the future. Quantifiable action plans are observed to obtain results—that are objectives (also called milestones or tactics). Objectives define a particular portion of a goal.
The goal may have several objectives—each defining a task. Using a sequence of tests to analyze the outcome of each objective—can provide the benefit of placing the related functions together. This process establishes chunks, which can smoothly measure progress. Keeping the above in mind, objectives are based on business processes. Therefore, a clear understanding of business processes entails sustainable solutions. Defining the role of each participant in the task is imperative for successful sustainable solutions. Because of the diverse nature of stakeholders—various people are assigned roles for the function. They depend on smooth coordination for a useful outcome. These positions include: ✓ Task performer ✓ Information contributor
✓ Other responsible individuals Swim Lanes: A simple format used in analyzing a business process. The swim lane distinguishes the workflow of the individual by creating a distinct path. Individuals become apparent with the use of connecting lines between lanes. The aim of a separate lane is to: ✓ Differentiate responsibilities for sub-processes, which may be assigned to another person ✓ Clarifying business process for different departments ✓ Explains the interactions of the individual business process at each stage The separate lane is an appropriate way to collaborate with others—because of its clarity in visualization and user interaction methodology.

By considering the importance of task workflow management in business processes, I have identified a three-step framework for laying out a workflow. The set of questions are as follows: 1. What is the probable result of the step? Can any measurement be constructed for the activity?
2. What is provided as an input data to the step and what will be the outcome of the results?
3. What decision has been taken for this step? Are there any subsequent rules and validation of input that must be done during this phase? These simple guidelines provide sufficient guidance while being adaptable, and paves a path to give structure and direction. They are powerful without being detailed or rigid.

Aligning Business strategy and IT Strategy Business strategy for an organization consists of: ✓ Mission ✓ Vision ✓ Objectives The business strategy provides a value preposition—to the organization. IT strategy includes: ✓ Information forms ✓ Rules ✓ Workflows ✓ Software applications ✓ Technical infrastructure The business strategy executes information workflows. The IT strategy supports it through effective coordination between different teams. A constructive outcome is; therefore, produced through the alignment of business strategy with the information system.

Information and Semantic Architecture Information Architecture (IA) is an effective method that can: ✓ Label and organize contents ✓ Presents the big picture with clarity as it is an arrangement of different parts of the system ✓ Assists users in finding the complete information The IA model also explains the rules for: ✓ Maintenance ✓ Inter-link ✓ Presentation of data To clarify these features of information, it is necessary to understand the interdependence of these three variables:
✓ Context: Goals of business, sources of funding, technology, constraints ✓ Content: Content objectives, data types, and documents, governance, existing structure, ownership ✓ Users: Audience, information-seeking behavior, needs, tasks, experience

Semantic Architectures Focusing on kinds of information and its organization a major goal of semantic infrastructure is to assist people—by providing precise information. It facilitates users by exploring policies and procedure—for creating and distributing contents and their technologies. The architecture elaborates the structure of contents that includes: ✓ Metadata ✓ Taxonomies ✓ Semantic networks ✓ Ontologies ✓ Topic Maps ✓ Advance knowledge representations
In today’s digital economy—data is the main constituent that promotes organizational innovation. However, data must be explored, and services are then created accordingly. This data-centric innovation has the following advantages for businesses: ✓ Customer satisfaction ✓ Productivity ✓ Cost control ✓ Personalized and dynamic products and services

When vision, mission, goals and objectives for business processes, workflow, data to information architectures are combined—meaningful applications with limited resources are achieved—at a minimal economic cost.
Information becomes a significant strategic asset in this case. Finally, it also elaborates the conceptual model which aligns business goals—and strengthens the relationship between people, processes, technology, and data.

1
Like
Comment
Share