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Gregory Shelton
over 6 months ago

More sophisticated software allows employers to now attach, for example, typing and logic tests to their applications. If you are applying on a laptop (or worse, your phone), you can see only a fraction of the screen, and you have to scroll up and down for every question. If you have only 2 minutes to reply for each one, you can see the problem this presents. A word processing examination that does not allow you to correct your mistakes is also unreasonable, with no parallel in real life.

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Gregory Shelton
over 6 months ago

I just applied for a job on LinkedIn, which told me the position was posted 16 hours ago, and it already had 73 applicants. I went on an interview last week where 100 were chosen, and only 10 were selected. Last Monday, for another job, 50 were interviewed and only 5 were selected. Sometimes you feel you should not be born before 1990, or have more experience than the age of the interviewer.

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Steven Ransom
over 6 months ago

20 years ago, job competition was not like it is today. Job board sites have made applying for jobs incredibly easy, which means more people apply for each job. In fact, it is not unusual for job postings to get hundreds or thousands of applications. The result? Your competition is much higher.

8 Secrets You Should Know

 Now more than ever, it is crucial to have a resume that sets                          you ahead of the pack. 

RESUME PARTS

Although resumes are composed using standard elements, there is no prescribed format that works equally well for everyone. Sections that do not relate to your objective or career field of interest may be de-emphasized or even omitted. Titles of sections can also be modified to describe the information presented more accurately.

HEADING Include name, permanent and local addresses, e-mail address, and phone number. If using two addresses, indicate dates you can be reached at each.

OBJECTIVE Opinions differ widely among employers and career professionals on the value of including a career objective. In general, an objective on your resume can be helpful if it concisely describes your immediate employment goal, but it is not an essential component of a successful resume. You may prefer to incorporate an objective in a job-search letter instead, especially if you want to be considered for a range of positions.

An objective should convey specific information about what you are seeking, but those that are too narrow can limit your options. If you decide to include an objective, specify the type of position you are seeking. If you find it difficult to write a definitive statement of your objective, describe the skills you want to use or the functions you want to perform. If you have more than one career interest, prepare several resumes, tailoring them to different objectives. The following are three examples of effective objectives:

  • A position in financial services using well-developed research, analytical, and quantitative skills.
  • A research position in health care combining interests in policy and medicine.
  • A position as a process engineer in the chemical industry.

A second approach is a summary of qualifications describing your skills and experience in relation to your career interest. Qualification summaries are less widely used than objectives but offer the opportunity to highlight your most important assets at the top of your resume. If your career interest is in working as a legislative aide, for example, you could summarize your most important accomplishments and skills in this way:

  • Researched and wrote detailed reports in a city government position.
  • Addressed student concerns as elected Student Assembly representative.
  • Wrote honors thesis on the relationship between state and federal government and the trend towards devolution.

EDUCATION List institutions attended and locations, including study abroad experience; degrees and dates received; major and concentration; and honors thesis title, if applicable. Include your GPA if it is at least 3.0; you may want to add your major GPA if it is considerably higher. [Note: Guidelines for science and technical fields may vary. Check with your college career office.] If you attended another college before coming to Cornell, include it only if you make reference to it elsewhere in your resume or cover letter. Don't include your high school unless it is nationally recognized or in an area where you want to work.

HONORS AND AWARDS Dean's List, honor societies, and academic awards can be listed in a separate section if you have more than one or two entries; if not, incorporate them in the education section. Only include scholarships that are based on merit.

RELEVANT COURSES List courses that are pertinent to your objective and employers' needs, particularly if your major does not directly relate to your employment goal. For example, if you are English major seeking work as a computer programmer, relevant courses will be computer-related.

EXPERIENCE This includes diverse experiences, both paid and unpaid:

  • Part-time work
  • Full-time work
  • Summer jobs
  • Co-op experience
  • Internships
  • Volunteer experience
  • Extracurricular activities

Include the position you held, name of the organization, city, and state of its location, and month and year of your involvement. Summarize what you accomplished in each experience and prioritize these results-oriented descriptions to support your job objective. Don't include every experience you have had, only those that demonstrate that you can succeed in the position you are pursuing. Use brief phrases beginning with action verbs, incorporating statistics, percentages, and numbers where possible:

  • Reorganized inventory procedures, shortening the process from 3 days to 2 days.
  • Designed and implemented a marketing strategy that increased sales by 25%.
  • Trained and coordinated activities of 33 volunteers, whose efforts resulted in raising $5,000.

SKILLS List computer languages and programs, knowledge of foreign languages, laboratory and research skills, analytical skills, and management skills not mentioned elsewhere.

ACTIVITIES AND INTERESTS In order of their importance, list student organizations, professional associations, committees, and community involvement, indicating offices held. Include high school activities only if directly relevant to your objective. After activities, list interests such as music, sports, and the arts, especially if they pertain to your career interest. You may want to avoid including religious activities or those representing extreme political views.

REFERENCES This section is optional. If included, say "available upon request."

I'm going to teach you how to write a resume from scratch using templates. In this resume writing video, you will learn how to write your own resume and avoid the high cost of a resume writer. I have some sample resume templates you can download for free that will help you with the process, but don't just copy the template. You can also download my resume writing worksheet to help you prepare all of the information you will need to write your resume. I'll give you a step by step approach to writing your resume using sample resume templates you can download from my personal Google drive. Writing a resume with example templates is very easy when you have someone show you how to do it.

See resume template download links below:

There are 5 easy steps I’m going to walk you through to writing your resume with templates.

STEP 1 – Resume Heading

STEP 2 – Objective statement

STEP 3 – Skills Summary

STEP 4 – Work Experience

STEP 5 – Education & Professional Training

The first thing you want to do when writing your resume from scratch is to create an inventory of everything you have done in your career.

This could be work experience, places you’ve worked, college, education, research, skills, accomplishments, references, training, seminars, published works, inventions, association memberships, honors, awards, volunteerism, etc., even personal hobbies. Anything and everything.

Use this resume planning worksheet as a guide to help you collect an inventory of all your skills and experiences. Avoid looking at a resume template you found on the Internet and trying to cobble all of your life’s experiences to fit.

The best way to write your resume is to take your time and write down everything I mentioned above and organize it into a resume worksheet. This way you’ll have everything all in one place and then you can systematically read through this article while transforming your worksheet into a first-class resume. And I’ll be here with you every step of the way.

DOWNLOAD the Resume Writing Worksheet

DOWNLOAD MICROSOFT WORD TEMPLATES

DOWNLOAD NEW BOOK, FIX YOUR RESUME IN 15 MINUTES by Don Georgevich Author, Speaker & Interview Coach

DOWNLOAD THE RESUME MASTERPIECE - RESUME WRITING GUIDE

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Ashley Wilson
over 6 months ago

Feeling frustrated because you applied to a TON of jobs and you still aren’t hearing back???

The problem could be that your resume is missing some important information!

If a company uses what’s called a [applicant tracking system] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l61IGZLXRkY) or ATS, your resume will go through a screening process. If it’s missing certain elements it will be pushed aside and not viewed by that particular company.

So, let’s look at some tips on how to use keywords to update your resume and beat the ATS!

Keywords are words that relate to the skills, abilities, credentials, and qualities that a hiring manager looks for in a candidate. When recruiters search for keywords in the ATS, they are looking to match certain concrete skills in your resume to their current needs. Come check out to see how yours match up and a list of keywords [here] (https://www.jobscan.co/blog/top-resume-keywords-boost-resume/ )!

Say for example you are applying for a job as the manager of a hotel restaurant. A recruiter may search for phrases such as “restaurant manager,” “hotel restaurant,” or even for the word “hospitality.” Recruiters will not likely look for words and phrases such as “outgoing," "hard worker,” "team player," etc.

It’s very important to remember that keywords highlight your skills and NOT your traits. Be sure to take some time to make an updated list of your keywords and add them to the work experience section of your resume!

For more tips please make sure to watch [this short clip] (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l61IGZLXRkY) as Lenin Pina teaches you how to beat the ATS and turn your resume into an interview!

Need help? Have questions? Please ask!

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Jimin McClain
over 6 months ago

I've applied for just about every job on every single job search website that remotely fits my resume. Some I've sought out, others I've gotten in job alert emails. I even get calls from recruiters offering me jobs that I am very clearly under-qualified for but they ask me for details and information to pursue and set something up for anyway (and I figure, why not?).

Some of the ones I'm applying for I feel like I match what they're looking for perfectly and yet haven't heard a thing from any of them, except one outright rejection which was no big deal, there's still the other 30 jobs I'd applied for. If a job posted THAT DAY and I apply within the first 48 hours, should I expect to wait longer than a week or two to even hear about the possibility for a first or a phone interview? I'm just wondering if this is normal or.. should I apply again to the same jobs with a resume I edited? I had gotten one of those resume reviews that suggested I change it up, so I did, and now I'm wondering if my old resume is better and it's a lot to think about! Thanks.

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Patrick Coppedge
over 6 months ago

Resumes That Appeal To Robot Recruiters

Your resume will not be seen by humans eyes first. And when it does reach a human for review, recruiters spend only six seconds on each one (if they read it at all). But the majority of resumes will never reach a human because the robot recruiter will reject a large number of them.

The robot recruiter is better known as an application tracking system (ATS). With the filtering algorithms of an ATS deciding whether you will ever get a call back for that first interview, it's important for job-seekers to know how to write a resume that will have robotic appeal.

Lets examine what is an Applicant Tracking System (ATS)? Most Employers who deal with high volume applicants rely on the ATS to sort through the hundreds or even thousands of resumes that they may receive for just one job posting. This process allows hiring managers to enter a command in the ATS to find candidates that have the qualifications, skill-sets, education and other critical elements required for success with a posted position that should be considered for the next step in the hiring process. The machine keeps all the important information for each applicant that it receives from the submitted resumes. From this large amount of submissions, 75 percent of job applicant's resumes are rejected before a hiring manager ever looks at them.

Finding Approval of a Robot Recruiter

Your resume should be written with the ATS in mind. Be honest when stating your experience and credentials, but there are ways to represent your background that will appeal to a robot recruiter. Here are six things to remember:

1.) Keywords Are Key

Something as simple as using a different tense or phrase could eliminate your CV from the review. For example, if you wrote, “Managed project from design to implementation,” and the hiring manager searched for, “project manager,” you might not come up in the search results even though you are describing the same responsibility. To try to increase the chances of your resume getting in front of the recruiter or hiring manager, be sure to use the exact phrases and keywords that were used in the job posting. And, don’t try to fool the system. Keywords should be included in your resume very naturally. If you try to cheat the system by stuffing keywords or including “invisible” keywords by changing the text to white, the hiring manager will see through these tactics on the other end of the system (even if you bypassed the algorithm).

2.) Research To Improve Your Odds If You Know The ATS System

All the ATS may have the same objective, screen applicants to streamline work for humans, they may do it in different ways. If the name of the ATS is available to you as a candidate, do a quick Google search to see if there is any information available to help you adjust your resume to better suit the system you are applying to. For example, if you find out that the system used by the employer you are applying is known to rank resumes with the keyword multiple times, try to include that keyword naturally, multiple times in your resume.

3.) Match Your Resume To The Posted Job Description

In addition to including keywords, be sure your resume matches as many aspects of the job description as possible. If the job posting includes responsibilities for leadership, project management and budgeting ensure your resume also includes these areas if they pertain to your own experience. Again, honesty is imperative so you shouldn’t include an example of budgeting if that hasn’t been a part of your work experience. However, if you have any sort of experience that you would be comfortable using in an interview to explain why you are the right candidate for this position, align your resume with the job responsibilities. Also, if you had a job title for a previous employer that was creative but could be misunderstood by a bot, such as Director of Getting Things Done, switch it to something more easily understood such as Project Manager.

4.) Carefully, Choose File Type And Formatting

Unfortunately, PDFs are not always bot friendly, so while a PDF would maintain the formatting of your resume, it might not pass through the ATS. Follow the instructions for file format if they are given in the job posting; if not, play it safe and submit a resume as a Word document. While charts, images, and logos are appealing to a human reviewer, bots have a hard time translating them. Clean and straightforward formatting is preferred such as solid circles for bullet points.

5.) Don't Put Critical Info In Headers And Footers

Some systems aren’t able to extract info from headers and footers. Make all crucial information about your background and experience is included in the main body of your resume to provide easy access to the robots.

6.) Human Touches Are Still Important

An email or a handwritten note sent, could bring your name to the attention of the hiring manager. You might pique their interest enough to have them do a little more digging for your credentials if you weren’t part of the ATS’ search results. A little human touch might mean the difference in a competitive and critical process.

Follow Me For Weekly Informative Articles Patrick Coppedge

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matt hicks
over 6 months ago

Taking the lead spot thinking my manager would actually help me change the mess the off shifts were in. He gave me no power to get them to work and would do nothing about the fact they wouldn't do there job. He told me to just handle it so I just ended up doing all the work while they did nothing.

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matt hicks
over 6 months ago

The company gave me nothing to love but a job and decent pay but not worth how bad the leadership and coworkers attitudes and work ethics were.

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Jennifer Jones
over 6 months ago

I made a difference at #ATS when I found 10k plus credit owed because of Telecom billing errors.

Found 10k plus in credits owed because of Telecom billing errors.

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Ashley Wilson
over 6 months ago

Resumes are important, right? No doubt you’ve worked hard on yours, but what happens if NO one is actually looking at it and you aren't landing any interviews? Yikes! Don’t worry, it’s not you, it’s them. Well sort of.

If a company uses what’s called a [applicant tracking system] (https://www.thebalance.com/what-is-an-applicant-tracking-systems-ats-2061926) your resume could be slipping through the cracks. The ATS is a program that companies use to sort through 1,000’s of resumes to find the best possible ones. If it doesn’t recognize what it needs, your resume will be cast aside and likely NEVER be seen by an actual person at that company. Here is what to do to help avoid that!

Utilize keywords When recruiters search for keywords in applicant tracking systems, they are looking for certain concrete skills in your resume that match up with their needs.

Say for example are applying for a job as the manager of a hotel restaurant, a recruiter may search for phrases such as “restaurant manager” and “hotel restaurant” or search for the word “hospitality.” Recruiters will not likely look for words and phrases such as “outgoing” and “hard worker.” This is because keywords highlight your skills not your traits. Take some time to make a list of yours and add them to the work experience section of your profile so your resume is noticed.

Wishing you the best of luck!

For more tips check out [this post] (https://www.jobcase.com/conversations/596c18f2-664b-5584-816e-ef1860520181?from=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.jobcase.com%252Fcommunity)!

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