Fair Chance to Succeed

Fair Chance to Succeed

Share
Report Content
+20k members
Sort by:
Trending
Featured post
Bullet point
Follow
Like
Comment
Share
Be the first one to comment
Add
Deborah Hill
Bullet point
Follow
3 days ago

With much experience supporting the federal government, I now seek to work in Maryland and learn and support the organizations in my surrounding areas.

2
5 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Jerilyn Brown
Bullet point
Follow
4 months ago

I'm keenly interested in knowing what challenges or obstacles post release felons are dealing with when looking for work. I want to know what state you live in, what kind of help are you getting to find work, what resources are available to you and who do you have to help you with everything you're required to do?

Are you on parole?

Are you required to find work within a certain period of time?

Do you have obstacles preventing you from finding a job such as addiction issues, housing, medical or mental health issues, transportation, education or lack of post release support & resources?

Tell me what your experience has been and tell me what you've learned from it. What do you think you need to be successful and to not reoffend or end up back in prison. Are you struggling with PV's due to lack of support or resources?

Share with me in the comments below. Your perspective is important.

#jobsearch #fairchancetosuceed #secondchances #advice

14
5 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Jerilyn Brown
Bullet point
Follow
5 months ago

Need a second chance after serving time? Good, felon-friendly jobs are available with the government and various companies. But you need to know how to get hired as an ex-offender. That includes deciding on a trade or other type of career to pursue, getting extra training if you need it, taking advantage of programs for ex-convicts, and more.

Millions of Americans have felony convictions. If you're one of them, you know that good jobs for felons aren't necessarily easy to come by. Securing employment is often the biggest challenge for ex-offenders and felons in this country. Opportunities can seem very sparse.

Even so, finding felony-friendly jobs is not impossible. Many ex-convicts are offered second chances, and you can join them. But first, it's important to remember a couple of things: Your experience is not uncommon. And the potential consequences of not persisting in your job search can be dire.

For felons, almost any legitimate job is better than the alternative of turning to crime. The job-search process can sometimes feel unfair and frustrating, but those who persist and know where to look often discover new reasons for hope and optimism about their futures. Jobs that hire felons may not be well advertised, but they are available if you make the extra effort necessary to find and qualify for them.

Some options require little to no post-secondary training. Many programs in the skilled trades will set you up for a paid apprenticeship, so you can earn a decent income while learning and gaining experience in your trade of choice.

Note: Not all employment opportunities within the following occupational areas are felon-friendly. They always depend on the policies and attitudes of each individual employer. And some of them depend on the vocational licensing regulations within your state. Certain felony convictions may Median hourly wage: $18.23 Typical qualifications: Vocational certificate

Delivery Driver Being a good driver can be very valuable in the job market. As long as you haven't committed theft or any serious traffic infractions (such as driving while intoxicated), you might be able to land a job that involves picking up and delivering packages or merchandise.

Median hourly wage: $17.62 Typical qualifications: Valid driver's license and a clean driving record

Shipping and Receiving Clerk Every large warehouse and big-box store requires clerks to handle and prepare incoming and outgoing merchandise or other materials. They tend to verify records, double-check items being delivered, and arrange shipments. It's a good job for certain kinds of ex-offenders who can be trusted with a lot of important details.

Median hourly wage: $17.74 Typical qualifications: High school diploma or GED

Helper to Construction Tradespeople What jobs can a felon get in the construction trades without becoming a licensed journeyman? Become a helper. Many skilled tradespeople need assistants willing to perform basic tasks such as carrying materials, holding tools, cleaning equipment and work sites, and helping with simple projects. For example, many carpenters, electricians, roofers, and stonemasons hire helpers. The bonus is that being a helper can provide a good introduction to a specific trade, which can help you decide whether to pursue it further yourself.

Median hourly wage: $18.04 Typical qualifications: High school diploma, GED, or vocational certificate

Barber Knowing how to cut and style men's hair, give clean shaves, and trim beards is a good set of skills to have. You might even be able to offer a mobile barbering service and go to your clients' homes or workplaces to make things more convenient for them. First, however, you should find out whether you'll be able to qualify for a barbering license in your state. Certain kinds of felonies might disqualify you.

Median hourly wage: $14.27 Typical qualifications: Vocational certificate or associate degree

Landscaping Worker Do you mind doing physically intensive work? Many gardening and landscaping companies hire people to help trim, water, fertilize, and plant lawns and other vegetation for their clients. Many of them also need people to help dig small trenches for sprinkler systems. And in some cases, they are willing to allow certain ex-cons to prove that they are honest and reliable workers.

Median hourly wage: $16.55 Typical qualifications: Vocational certificate or high school diploma or less

Dog Trainer Being around domesticated animals can be good for your mental health, especially if you've had to spend time in prison. Dogs are particularly worthy companions, which is why they are incredibly popular with many pet owners. Many dog owners will pay good money for help with training their canine companions to follow commands, stay well-behaved, or even perform basic tricks. That's why this industry sometimes offers enjoyable jobs for felony offenders who don't have violent backgrounds and want a chance at self-employment.

Median hourly wage: $15.04 Typical qualifications: Vocational certificate

Cook The culinary industry has a strong track record of being a good source of jobs for ex-cons. Many restaurants don't perform background checks. And if you prove that you can be counted upon, then this industry often provides opportunities for moving into higher, better-paying positions. Plus, in addition to restaurants, you might be able to find employment opportunities at institutional cafeterias. Just be aware that places like schools and hospitals will probably have stricter requirements and want to check your background for certain felonies.

Median hourly wage: $14.00 Typical qualifications: High school diploma or vocational certificate

Stock Clerk or Order Filler Large stores, warehouses, and distribution centers employ many people to help unload trucks, stock shelves, fill customers' orders, set up displays, and organize stock inventories. You may have to work early in the morning or late at night, but this kind of job can be fun in its own way. A felony conviction for theft, violence, or drug use may cause employers to not want to hire you. But if you can show good references and prove that you've matured as a person, you may have a chance at landing a position.

Median hourly wage: $14.48 Typical qualifications: High school diploma or less"

Remember to consider what skills you already possess that could be transferable. Look for job fairs and hiring events in your area. Check the local Union websites for hiring events and training schedules.

#secondchances #hiringnews #motivation #interview

14
2 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
John Frisosky
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago

Even though it s evident on my summary type resume focused on experience and skills, there is a gap in time. The application asked have you been convicted of a felony in the past 5 years? I answered No, which is the truth because I was in prison. 6 years.

141
100 Answers
Like
Answer
Share
See all answers
Elwood Fields
Bullet point
Follow

The best time and proper time is on your application and at the interview

2y
Mark As Helpful
Noralyn Pallasa
Bullet point
Follow
HR Manager and Labor Law Rep

Here is the right answer due to EEO Policy you should not be discriminated due to your life history but your qualification to do the job. That's one the second reason why you should not be asked regarding your life history is due to the BAN THE BOX LAW- Ban the Box is a law that requires employers to remove questions about criminal history on employment applications. Its name refers to the checkbox that asks if a candidate has ever been convicted of a crime. Currently, 37 states and over 150 cities and counties have implemented Ban-the-Box laws to encourage employers to consider a candidates’ qualifications before any bias from reviewing conviction or arrest records plays into the employment decision. Find out if your state is within these states or cities that has the provision of Ban The Box law. If it is, you got your answer. Second chance programs and government contracts highly encourage companies to hire convicted criminals. Let's face it who has not made a mistake, and wished they could do over? Everyone deserves a second chance. If you are given a second chance make sure you do the very best you can to make a better life for you. Best of luck.

1y
Mark As Helpful
Add
Jerilyn Brown
Bullet point
Follow
29 days ago

It's been a while since I posted about felon Friendly job opportunities so I thought this would be a good time to revisit the topic.

Anyone who's spent time inside knows that sometimes, despite your best efforts that finding a job can be a stressful and daunting challenge. Where do you start? If you've spent a number of years out of society and are lacking a good resume and job experience it can be hard to figure out where to look.

This article has some great ideas of how to find your direction. You can use any work experience you gained while incarcerated to develop a list of skills that can be transferred to a good paying job. Some may require certifications & training. The good news is that there are many states and cities that are Ban the Box participants and many companies that have signed the Second Chance Pledge. Look up your state's .gov website to see if you live in one of those areas.

There are paid apprenticeship programs, college courses and training programs available to felons. These are part of an effort to decrease recidivism and give felons a chance to gain employment which benefits them, their families and their communities.

To find out more check out the link below. Also, make sure to complete your Jobcase profile, use the AI Resume Building tool & upload your resume and check the jobs icon on your profile page for job leads. Jobcase also has the Second Chance Resources Center that has lots of information.

Felon Friendly

Looking for a job as a felon is tough but not impossible. Stick with it, don't give up and don't give in. You got this!

#motivation #hiringnews #secondchances

13
3 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Hidden
Franklin Lewis
Bullet point
Follow
24 days ago

Been out of prison a year, had a good job and got laid off. Got called back on a different shift and had an accident. It took me at least 5 months to find a new job, an it only lasted for 2 weeks. Currently unemployed, but still trying to get a new job.

5
3 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
See all answers
Alexander Montoya
Bullet point
Follow
Top Answer
3 people found this answer helpful
Commercial Driver

@Julie Ann I wouldn’t worry to much about a misdemeanor. Companies only really inquire about felony convictions majority of the time.

In the meantime, try searching the job board for potential employment opportunities. Click on the button that says jobs and you’ll be able to explore positions and submit applications there. Good luck! 🍀

15w
3
3 Marked Helpful
See all replies
Jerilyn Brown
Bullet point
Follow
Stellar Guest Services Advocate

@Julie Ann you live in a state that allows many misdemeanor charges to be set aside from your record, giving you the security of non-disclosure. This may be particularly useful if you are wanting to continue in child care. It will depend on the charges and if all court requirements have been met.

**"You are generally only able to have misdemeanor offenses removed from your record if the case was dismissed or if you were found not guilty of the offense. This new Texas ‘second chance’ law will now allow for the removal and ‘non-disclosure’ even if you had a first time conviction for a fine only, Class C misdemeanor, or a conviction for other Class A or Class B misdemeanors. You may now be eligible to clear this from your record. Many common misdemeanors will be eligible for this new procedure, including:

Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) Theft Drug Convictions Marijuana Possession Unlawfully Carrying a Weapon (UCW)/ Gun Possession Check Fraud Cases reduced to a Class C misdemeanor conviction / time-served sentence.

You must petition the court, requesting the removal of the offense from your record. If you have complied with all required conditions such as serving jail time, community service hours, and paying fines and restitution, then the court will grant your petition. The granting of your petition will result in an “Order of Non-Disclosure”. This means the offense will be removed and erased from your public record and you will be legally entitled to respond, when asked about the offense, that you were never convicted, accused, or found guilty of the crime in question."**

Here is a link to the Texas Law Library that you may find useful. You may be able to file a petition without an attorney in your city. TX Law

I hope you find this helpful.

Link
14w
1
1 Marked Helpful
See all replies
Add
norris Canty
Bullet point
Follow
about 2 months ago
14
3 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Steven Revell
Bullet point
Follow
over 6 months ago
11
5 Answers
Like
Answer
Share
See all answers
Scott Silvers
Bullet point
Follow
Top Answer
1 person found this answer helpful
Until it is done, it will remain undone...

@Steven Revell, Here are some jobs in your area that are currently hiring:

Warehouse Brady Industries Las Vegas, NV https://www.jobcase.com/jobs/results?q=warehouse&l=Las+Vegas%2C+Nevada&jlkey=U-107416083530

Warehouse Worker Adecco North Las Vegas, NV https://www.jobcase.com/jobs/results?q=warehouse&l=Las+Vegas%2C+Nevada&jlkey=U-107433157095

Day Warehouse Worker The Chefs' Warehouse Las Vegas, NV https://www.jobcase.com/jobs/results?q=warehouse&l=Las+Vegas%2C+Nevada&jlkey=U-107433076303

48w
1
1 Marked Helpful
Nur Yunlu
Bullet point
Follow
Restaurant Worker / Designer / Marketing

Hey @Steven Revell,

Welcome to the Jobcase community. We have great resources for felonies who want to start a new chapter in their life. Please, check out the Jobcase second chances resource center

I also shared a video about finding a job with a criminal background. Please, check out the video I shared.

Good Luck.

48w
Mark As Helpful
See all replies
Add
Joshua Coronado
Bullet point
Follow
about 2 months ago

I was listening to KCRW this afternoon, and I heard an interesting ad about an upcoming townhall meeting held by Zócalo Public Square, and sponsored by KCRW. The topic will be the job market for the formerly incarcerated in Los Angeles and beyond.

Representatives from the Strategic Reentry Initiatives of the mayor's office will be discussing the opportunities available to the formerly incarcerated, sharing resources, and providing personal support to anyone who wants to talk about the job market for felons.

Following the discussion will be a reception with snacks and opportunities to connect with the speakers and others working through reintegration.

The event will be held on January 24, 2024 at 7pm at the ASU California Center at 1111 S Broadway, Los Angeles, CA 90015.

https://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/good-job-formerly-incarcerated/

#jobsearch #hiringnews #hiringevents

6
1 Comment
Like
Comment
Share
More groups