Colleen Method
7 months ago
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Advice Needed or an idea or two

My question is - how would you describe the term Library Assistant when looking for a job - even outside the library world?

I'm asking because I am out of ideas on what to look for in a job with my skill sets in play. :) So I don't cookie cutter myself into one field alone.

I'll be working with a vocational rehabilitation job coach soon so just wanted some terms to share with them. (Hint for my friends with autism - they do work in many places in the country for free.) Many states have them under different names though.

Thanks in advance.

Colleen #termination #autism

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John Huang
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Hi Colleen! Great question. From my limited knowledge of library operations, I would focus on describing the personal interactions and relationships as forms of customer service. Managing the organization of books while using a computer system is a form of inventory management. Finally, I would highlight organization skills and an attention to detail as strengths for jobs that require a lot of focus. Hope that helps. Keep us posted and thanks for the tip for job seekers with autism!

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Matthew Ireland
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Hi Colleen - John’s answer makes a lot of sense, but I think it may also depend on other functions you’ve done at your former job. Library assistants often know where to look to find answers. Do you consider yourself a person that can help with research? There are jobs (especially through universities, authors, research organizations) that need people that have a strong attention to detail and have the ability to find answers. Just another thought.

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Kris Ward
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I think John and Matthew are right on point. Try to "de-library" your specific responsibilities. Think of every task you were given (especially the ones you did regularly), and remove the library in it. So regularly returning books back to their shelves, could be returning inventory to their shelves. Working with patrons to find the resources they are looking for, could be providing outstanding customer support.

Hope that makes sense and helps! I wanted to also say, I love the positive attitude and resourcefulness. I have a former college classmate that has written a couple of books about living with Aspergers (I know it may not be exactly appropriate for your situation), but his most recent book is about adult life with autism and a piece of it is about maintaining employment. It's called Getting a Life with Aspergers by Jesse Saperstein. Just a recommendation!

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Thomas Ryan
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Go to onetonline.org, take your skill set and see how many different jobs that skillset lines up with. You can also take your past job and breakout all the different skills, many of which you don't realize are actual skills and see how many are transferrable. You might even look for a dream job and take note what skills and education are required and create your career.

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