Elyssa Duncan
Community Specialist
Posted May 18, 2021

Who are good professional connections to build your network?

Building up a robust professional network is important for all stages of career growth and development. Here are tips for identifying your existing network and determining who you should include to expand your connections.
Elyssa Duncan
Community Specialist
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Who are good professional connections to build your network?
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One of the best ways to create job opportunities for yourself is through your personal network and connections. While it might sound a bit intimidating, networking isn’t as complicated as it may sound. You just have to learn how and when to use your connections to land a job!

How to identify your existing network

Whether you are a seasoned worker or a student looking for a first job, you are already part of a network! When thinking about building up your personal network, it might sound intimidating, but we're here to show you how easy connecting with others can be.

For tips on making the most out of your network, check out our Jobcase Connections Resource Center!

Your personal network consists of people you’ve built close relationships within either a personal or professional setting. This network is often great at helping with career development. Some ways this network can benefit you include:

  • Finding new job opportunities
  • Providing advice
  • Exploring new career paths
  • Offering to be a reference

Who should you include in your network?

No matter what kind of network you are aiming to build and maintain, your network is only as good as the individuals you connect with! Including a variety of people helps keep your options open and expands your reach. Connections can be people you already know or people you have yet to meet! Here are some ideas of who you should add to your network.

Fellow social media users

In today’s digital world, establishing a strong online presence is just as important as interacting with people face to face. Building connections through online platforms such as Jobcase is a great way to expand your network! Online communities and digital profiles have changed the networking landscape; you can rely on your fellow members for introductions, referrals, references, and reviews, all in one convenient place.

Before connecting with others on social platforms, here are some quick tips:

  • Choose a professional profile photo. Your photo plays a large role in establishing credibility and generating trust with others. While you don’t need to hire a professional photographer to take a glamour headshot, please do not upload a bathroom selfie!

  • Completely fill out your online profile. Filling out your profile with your complete work history and job preferences will help those who are helping you look for applicable opportunities. Having a bio that describes a bit more about you will also add some personality to your page. Finally, having an education section with your school information will help people looking to connect with fellow alumni find you!

Jobcase Tip: To invite your personal contacts to the Jobcase community, you can sync your contacts to quickly find and connect with people you know in real-life!

Past supervisors

Most times (as long as you’ve left on a good foot) your old boss or manager will be happy to become part of your network! They can be a valuable resource during your #jobsearch, acting as a recommendation or reference should you need them.

When the time comes to look for a new role, these leaders may know of other opportunities you could be a good fit for and help you make a new connection with someone at that organization.

Current and former coworkers

Your coworkers - past and present - make great additions to your professional network. One of the greatest benefits they can offer is “insider” access to new jobs or departments that may be opening up. This can help with internal moves or opportunities for advancement before they are publicly advertised to other potential candidates. If one of you had moved on to new opportunities, a whole new world of networking possibilities might open up for you!

Coworkers can also attest to your work ethic and teamwork abilities. While they may not be able to provide a “supervisor’s viewpoint” of your skills, they can give an inside look at what it is like working alongside you day in and day out.

Friends and family

While it might seem silly to include friends and family into a professional network, they can be a great asset! For example, even if you and your friend work in completely different fields or roles, you can consult them as part of your professional network to help you solve problems in ways you haven’t considered before.

Clients and customers

This group can attest to how well you did your job when you worked for them! This is especially helpful for freelancers, tradespeople, and salespersons. Their testimonies can help you land future jobs! As an employee, clients and customers can connect with you job openings by helping you find postings in their own network or by pointing you to open roles at their company.


Who have you recently added to your professional network?

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Elyssa Duncan
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