The employer said you aren't a good fit

Last updated: May 20, 2024
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Ashley Wilson
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Content Manager at Jobcase
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The employer said you aren't a good fit
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Did you just start what you thought was your dream job only to realize it’s not the right fit for you? Feeling uncertain about a new job is normal — in fact, many workers find themselves in this situation at some point in their careers. That being said, it's important to take proactive steps to figure out if the job you’re working is a good fit for you.

This article will help you recognize the difference between job dissatisfaction and job transition issues while also giving you six steps to address the situation. You can determine if the job is right for you with clear communication and action steps.

What are the signs a new job is not a good fit?

When starting a new job, it can take some time to adjust to the new role, responsibilities, and company. Giving yourself adequate time to adjust to the position is important before you make any major decisions about leaving or staying.

If after a few months have passed and you still have misgivings, then it's important to pause and examine your feelings closely. Here are some common signs that a new job is not a good fit:

The job is different from what you expected

While it's common for job descriptions and roles to evolve, if you find that your current role has changed drastically from the one you accepted during the interview process, this could be a warning sign that the job’s not the right fit.

You don’t feel challenged or fulfilled in the role

Feeling stagnant and bored in your new job could indicate you're not being adequately challenged or stimulated. Choosing a career where you can test and enhance your skills is a great way to stay engaged.

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Your skills aren’t being utilized

If you accepted a role because it made the most of your skill set and then found out that the job was not what was discussed, then the job may not be suitable for you. If you find yourself bored and distracted, you are probably not being challenged enough; the job may be below your skill level.

You feel overwhelmed and undervalued

If you're feeling stuck, stressed, or unappreciated in a role, other employment might suit you better in the long term. Feeling overwhelmed can be a sign that the job is too demanding or the workload is too heavy. Feeling unappreciated is another feeling to listen to. Most people are willing to work hard as long as their efforts are appreciated.

The company culture is not the right fit

Finding a work environment where you feel comfortable and supported by your colleagues is a must. It's not a bad thing to want a job environment conducive to your personality and values.

Read more on what career experts have to say about finding a new job and how to get hired.

Six steps to take if your new job isn’t a good fit

If you've recognized signs that your new job isn’t the best fit, then there are steps you can take to address the situation. Having a game plan and being proactive is the best way to handle the problem.

1. Re-evaluate your expectations.

Take a step back and re-examine the job description, role, and responsibilities you accepted when you were hired. Think about what attracted you to the position in the first place and compare it to where you are currently. This will give you clarity on whether the job is a good fit or you need to look elsewhere.

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2. Speak to your management team.

Talk openly with your hiring manager or management team about where you're at in the role and what you hope to achieve. Communication is key to any successful working relationship. This conversation can help identify whether there are opportunities within the company that can help meet your needs or help you see that it's time to move on. It's also helpful to ask management about any promising positions, projects, or initiatives that could come up in the near future.

3. Identify opportunities for growth and development.

If you decide to stay in the role, it's important to identify opportunities for growth and development that will help you reach your long-term career goals. This could include taking on additional responsibilities or exploring new challenges. Ask for additional training or development programs to enhance your skills and help you reach your full potential.

4. Consider other opportunities within the company.

If no openings in your current role or department match your expectations, then it's worth exploring opportunities within other departments of the same organization. Ask questions and create new relationships to learn as much as you can about where you are. This will allow you to stay with the company while gaining new skills and experiences.

5. Look outside of your current organization.

You don't always have to leave your current job to find a better fit. With the average workweek falling at around 34.4 hours for most employees in America, there is time to pursue other opportunities while continuing to work. This could include part-time jobs, freelance contracts, volunteer positions, or even starting your own business.

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6. Take time with your decision.

As of October 2022, there were over 10.3 million job openings in the US — an ample amount of options available to you. Take the time to research and explore different opportunities before making a decision. Consider your long-term goals, budget, and lifestyle when evaluating additional job opportunities. Take a deep breath and make a final decision you are both confident and comfortable with.

If you’ve navigated all these steps and you've determined your current job is not the right fit for you, don't hesitate to start a new job search. True, it can be intimidating to leave a new job so soon after starting it. However, if it's clear the position isn't going to work out, why waste time? Invest in yourself by discovering a job that feels rewarding to you.

On the bright side, you have a job. You don’t need to rush and accept the first job to come your way. You can give yourself enough time to make an informed decision about your next career path. Reflect on what matters most to you and pursue roles that align with your skills and values. Investing in a job you’re passionate about and transferring your skill set to that new job can make all the difference for your long-term career success.

Don’t settle for a job that makes you unhappy

While rejection never feels good, it's important to remind yourself that you will find a job. The fact that you were able to land an interview is a great sign that employers find your qualifications desirable, and you can absolutely land more interviews.

Continue to search for jobs on Jobcase and know that another great opportunity is just around the corner.

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jacqueline misera
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Holistic Altenative Psychotherapist, Licensed Massage Therapist

I am a stress manager Ford and every time one door closes I tell my clients a bigger better door will open. Most declined ones are overqualified whichfrom an employers viewpoint is the same as being "not qualified". Because you will leave when a better paying job opens up.

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Ford Simpson
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Jack of all trades,.master of none

Yes ,I was told they had hired to many workers. I was working with about 50 horses, they let me go and I ended up working with 200 horses instead.Things will feel bad at first but my situation improved beyond my expectations! Ford

4y
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jacqueline misera
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Holistic Altenative Psychotherapist, Licensed Massage Therapist

Also, your qualifications might be more than is needed for this particular job, so don't despair. They know you will quit sooner if you find a job fitting your qualifications. So it might not be you at all. Keep looking! Jacqueline, Stressbustersinc.org

4y
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