Davina Kuritz
almost 2 years ago
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Asking for a raise?

So I've got a decent job. No benefits or anything and he hired me in the spot. Well, when he asked how much I want I froze and blurted out $10/hr. (Ridiculous on my part) well I found out the position was paying 14/hr. And now I'm kicking myself. .. another employee told me to just tell them I had another job offer but I really want to stay , and can they give me 14 , I dont know what to do or how to go about doing it, I've only been there a week, but they all really like me and I think I'm doing pretty good. Help!

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Ashley Wilson
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Oh no @Davina Kuritz ! Mistakes happen to the best of us. In the future definitely, research the salary as well as evaluate your worth based on experience and what you bring to the company!

2y
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Veronica Jefferson
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Davina Kuritz -

I suggest that you consider this approach:

  1. Research the position and its pay via www.payscale.com. Find matching or similar positions of the same field/type, and write down the listed pay scale for each (3 minimum).

  2. Choose the highest listed pay out of the 3 you've written down and keep this number mentally stored to prepare your approach.

  3. Kindly request a one-to-one with your manager/supervisor, and explain that there's something you'd like to discuss regarding your position with the company. Be vague and give no details as of yet.

  4. During this one-to-one, express key positive points leading up to your on-the-spot hire. Express your gratitude and appreciation for the position you have, and that you really feel like you can excel well in this role. Then position yourself leading up to the pay inquiry something like this:

"I've done some research regarding this position and I find that the starting pay rate for this role is $$. I was thrilled to have been offered this position on the spot but as a result of that excitement this caused me to undersell myself in terms of my specified pay rate. After conducting my research for this role and thinking about it more clearly, this is a position that I really enjoy, and strongly believe that my pay should match the position and its duties. With that said I am kindly requesting you to consider all of my efforts leading up to this one-to-one, my research on the position, and more importantly, understand my actions for approaching you so soon into my employment. I'd like to renegotiate my starting pay rate..."

Now, from here is where you will be asked for a number in terms of what you're seeking. This is where that research you did, choosing the highest pay rate for the position comes into play. However, you do not give them the actual number. Instead you give them a number range. Example: "I'd like to renegotiate my pay rate between the range of $ and $$. I believe this is fair for the position and it will continue my best efforts to be a contributing factor to the team."

You have to be able to paint a picture when approaching others with something that's specific or even uncomfortable. As additional help, you might want to highlight all you've done for the company since being hired on the spot. That way it shows the boss that you care about being a team player and not just someone who wants more money. I hope you find this very helpful, and best of luck.

2y
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Anthony Harrington
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At this point it may be difficult to ask for more money now that you have started. Salary negations are typically part of the interview process. Coming to management now with a different rate might be seen as a bit sketchy,

You don't want to provide your employer an ultimatum as part of broaching the subject of compensation, though.

Honesty might be the best approach in this case. Ask to meeting with your manager and let them know that you appreciate the job and see yourself as being part of their organization for a while, but that you feel you sold yourself short on salary when weighted against the amount of work you perform.

Simply ask them what it would take to get a raise in pay. If not immediately, then in the future. It will show them that you are looking at the long game instead of just wanting more up front.

As others have said, know the salary range of the position before interviewing. This can typically be found on sites like Glassdoor.com.

2y
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Isaac Davis
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Yes

2y
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Corey Gowdy
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I, too, made that mistake before. I was too nervous and scared to ask for the actual raise. Which, would've put me in the same pay grade as my former co-workers from that job at that time. I don't think it will hinder you if you at least inquire about the raise to your HR Dept or to your boss. Especially, since they like you and you're doing a good job.

I feel like that company shanghai'd you though. I felt that way about the company I had worked for at that time too. It is very dishonest for companies to do that. However, some companies will get-over any way they can. It's unfortunate. May God Bless You and Keep You. Go 4 It!

2y
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Sheryn B
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Davina Kuritz: Yikes!! I think I would humbly approach the hiring manager and say, "Thank you for offering me this position: I feel it has been a great fit... but, can I please have the opportunity to renegotiate my starting pay? In my excitement for the position, I blurted out a number before thinking..." Or something like that. The worse thing he/she can say is no: the best he/she renegotiates. Either way: the hiring manager is aware. Hopefully you can calm the butterflies in your stomach.

2y
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Corey Gowdy
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To the people commenting on others posts, I'd like to point out that I understand what is meant by "Know the pay range beforehand."

However, in cases, such as this one, whereas the interviews have already taken place and the person has already become an employee, commenters need to take into account the posters current situation.

See the situation for what it is the poster is asking. Not for what would've, could've, or should've been. That is very discouraging and you all are not helping the situation when you do that to people who are asking for positive advice.

2y
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Alison Midstokke
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Hi, what I normally do is I go onto Glassdoor to check the employer's ratings/reviews and I try to find an average pay for the position I have applied for. For an example, if I've applied for a Manager position with XYZ I will go to Glassdoor and see any salaries that come up under the position with XYZ. If not then you can do a search online to see the average salary that comes up. Also, remember that the location makes a difference in pay as well. In the future, you could say, "I am willing to negotiate the salary, however, I am seeking the salary range between 50k-65k.

2y
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Elanson Akin
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All you need to do is say it just like this" now that you have seen my hard work and dedication and I've proven myself to be worthy of the job is it possible to get the salary of which one is qualified for and not the salary of one hoping to land the job? Waite a nother week or so before presenting him/her. Prove yourself,. His way your not just speaking of a very short period but of consistency, dedication day in day out, and don't be shy , quiet but strong and true, and of course be happy, cheerfull ,"be positive in all you do" be patient and stay true in your approach to yourself. I've always said"stay true to yourself and you can never go wrong.... Good luck

2y
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