John Cizman
over 6 months ago
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How do I combat the age discrimination that works against my over age 50 clients? I just met with a recruiter who candidly admitted that his clients would invariably prefer someone like himself, a 20 something recent college graduate, to my 60 year old client who has a visible physical disability. I've researched companies that are known to hire "seniors" but they are either based outside of Colorado or are not currently hiring. The irony is that some of these companies are being undercut by new companies led by "young" entrepreneurs. I need advice!

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Tanya Fitzgerald

John, I'm afraid that I'm an expert in this field in that I'm over 55, over educated, over opinionated and blessed with a very visible disability. My partial paralysis has not prevented me from opening doors, driving, maintaining a 183 bowling average or changing small minded opinions of my limitations. That 20 something recruiter actually presented you with his own small minded opinion and rather than challenge it you accepted it. To get past this bias you must first think with it. What does your candidate have that makes him both qualified and limited? Does his expectations and limitations restrict his employment in certain industries? Both you and your candidate need to know his minimum standards of living and then run with it. Employers are aware of both tax credits for hiring the disabled and BFOQ listings for their positions. I hope this helps you and your candidate in your search.

John, I'm afraid that I'm an expert in this field in that I'm over 55, over educated, over opinionated and blessed with a very visible disability. My partial paralysis has not prevented me from opening doors, driving, maintaining a 183 bowling average or changing small minded opinions of my limitations. That 20 something recruiter actually presented you with his own small minded opinion and rather than challenge it you accepted it. To get past this bias you must first think with it. What does your candidate have that makes him both qualified and limited? Does his expectations and limitations restrict his employment in certain industries? Both you and your candidate need to know his minimum standards of living and then run with it. Employers are aware of both tax credits for hiring the disabled and BFOQ listings for their positions. I hope this helps you and your candidate in your search.

6y
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David A Klein

Hello John....one of the first things you must ask yourself and/or your candidate are they intimidated by their age? Chances are they are willing to do an interview knowing the employer may not hire them. Answer the questions as if it was their job to lose and follow where the employer goes with their questioning. The confidence will come through when you/ they answer and give what your experience has taught you. If you felt that you did well on the interview but still get turned down ask the employer how can you improve or what more or different should you have for next time? Always try to keep the interview as positive as possible and try to get a final reason for their choice (if it isn't you.) This way you will be able to tell if indeed it was age discrimination. Best of luck...Dave

Hello John....one of the first things you must ask yourself and/or your candidate are they intimidated by their age? Chances are they are willing to do an interview knowing the employer may not hire them. Answer the questions as if it was their job to lose and follow where the employer goes with their questioning. The confidence will come through when you/ they answer and give what your experience has taught you. If you felt that you did well on the interview but still get turned down ask the employer how can you improve or what more or different should you have for next time? Always try to keep the interview as positive as possible and try to get a final reason for their choice (if it isn't you.) This way you will be able to tell if indeed it was age discrimination. Best of luck...Dave

6y
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Steven Robertson

John,

Excellence shouldn't be difficult to sale. So a 20 something recent graduate who has no real world experience is a valuable asset?

The problem I have with this is that 20 somethings who are fresh out of college are also easily replaced because the market is flooded with them.

John,

Excellence shouldn't be difficult to sale. So a 20 something recent graduate who has no real world experience is a valuable asset?

The problem I have with this is that 20 somethings who are fresh out of college are also easily replaced because the market is flooded with them.

6y
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Carmen St John

I am 62, soon to be 63. I am healthy and physically able to continue working. I have my Bachelor's and Master's degree. I am willing to downsize but then I am considered overqualified. So I don't get the jobs I can do because the young ones get them and when I try to go for lower level positions, I am overqualified. I don't want to file for my retirement but this is so hard. I am darned if I do and darned if I don't. I just want to keep earning and contributing. What is wrong with that?

I am 62, soon to be 63. I am healthy and physically able to continue working. I have my Bachelor's and Master's degree. I am willing to downsize but then I am considered overqualified. So I don't get the jobs I can do because the young ones get them and when I try to go for lower level positions, I am overqualified. I don't want to file for my retirement but this is so hard. I am darned if I do and darned if I don't. I just want to keep earning and contributing. What is wrong with that?

6y
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