Raquel Robles
over 1 year ago
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What to say in a interview?

Hi Jobcase Community unfortunately inhave no job since last Friday. And if i do get future interviews what can i say about that one manager treated me unfairly or bullying we know we do not suppose to talk about manager or the previous job how to handle that question if i am asked about it.

Thank You

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Gage Cherry
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You say something along the lines of:

“I resigned because I felt the company was not a good fit for me and I felt that for the sake of both my personal and professional development, I should look for external employment opportunities.”

You’re not blaming the company at all or speaking negatively, just that it wasn’t a good fit. You also state that you’re interested in both personal and professional development.

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Cammie Mangan
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Tell the truth just don't draw it out to long.

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Floyd Smith
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How are they going to know about this unless you bring it up first. The more you stay on this one subject itcould turn around against you with interviewer or boss of the company start thinking that you could become a liability risk or troublemaker if they give you a job. One of the first rules in an interview never criticize or make accusations of a former manager or boss even if true. The less you say in your interview about any past issues the better for you. Just be nice and respectful of your former job and that you just wanted to move on you feel better qualified for the position you're looking for and would like the chance to prove yourself. Do this and you'll be okay.

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Deshuna Breaux
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well Raquel Robles i kind of understand when i used to work at subway the manager would talk about them behind their backs,no one works at subway any more because she doesn't know how to keep people she drove them off .For one when i worked there the manager i guess terminated me simply because she said i was a no call no show but it turns out she never called me because i never seen a miss call from her pop up and also because one of the employees that she hired had criminal records so she told me to pick up the slicer for the vegetables and as soon as i picked it up my finger got caught in it and it had to be unscrewed and i wasn't trained on how to do that so the other girl should have got in trouble for telling me to pick it up without supervision i got my finger cut in one slicer and another finger caught in the other slicer.

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Kevin .
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Just be yourself. If they hire you, they will let you know, if not, no matter what you said, you won’t get hire.

Stay positive, don’t feel like you must take that position.

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Chuck Cramer
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I recommend that you keep that part of the interview short and simple. Something on the order of I felt it was time to seek other opportunities should suffice. Never badmouth you previous employer. Doing so will cause s red flag to many interviewers. Instead turn the conversation on what you can bring to the table.

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Cynthia Gray
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I had a horrible boss as well. She treated me unfair and bully me. She came on board in June 2018 and I was there for 6 years. She just didn't like me! Some people said that she felt intimidated by me. But, I don't know why. I came to work and done my job.

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chris olivarez
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Never Ever bad mouth your former employer no matter what the situation. Your applying and interviewing for a new position then you cast yourself in a negative light by bad mouthing your former employer. If your asked why you don't work at that company just say that "you felt that it wasn't a good fit" or something like that. I've worked for some pretty dishonest and shady businesses but never said anything negative

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Raymond Gledhill
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I usually just say that i was moving on to better opportunities but do like the movie stars do and when you talk about your old jobs talk about the things you loved and then when they ask about the things you didnt like.... Tell them about some peoblems that you fixed. Ive had soooooo many interviews as exec. Chef its not funny and im also one to say the wrong thing so this is something ive figured out. Hope it helps

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Lorraine Belasco
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Hi Raquel, I found this article to assist with the same question online. I hope it helps; Have your talking points ready about an unfortunate situation. By Chrissy Scivicque, Contributor Aug. 15, 2013 U.S. News & World Report More

Chrissy Scivicque "So, why did your previous employer let you go?"

Ouch. Rough question to get in a job interview. But let's be real: If you encountered a termination in the past, it's one you will get asked – guaranteed.

For a question like this, it's especially important to prepare and practice. Stumbling over your words can sound like you're hiding something or as if you're not exactly sure what happened – neither of which will put you at the top of the list for prospective employers.

To help you feel calm, cool and confident when facing this question, keep the following tips in mind:

  1. Don't beat yourself up. Not every employer is a perfect match for every employee. Most people, including your interviewer, get that. Don't let this situation drag you down for the rest of your career. The more you practice how to respond to this question, the more the emotion will dissipate.

You don't want to go into the interview still feeling raw about what happened, so take time to process the events that took place and put things in perspective. Turn this into a powerful learning experience from which you can really grow. In all likelihood, that's exactly what it was for you. Now you just need to learn to articulate that.

  1. Be honest. The truth always comes out and it's better that they hear it from you than someone else. A reference check may very well reveal the full story anyway, so don't try to brush things under the rug or turn the situation into something it wasn't.

  2. Share what happened. Go through the "story" in a concise, straightforward way, sharing only the facts, not your feelings or perceptions.

  3. Emphasize what you learned. Take ownership for your role in the situation. Don't blame others or make excuses. Remember that there are two sides to every story and your interviewer knows that. If you start focusing on how you were the victim and everyone did you wrong, a big red flag will appear. It takes two to tango, my friend. No matter how "victimized" you might have been, you and your actions were indeed a part of it.

Position yourself as a mature, self-reflective person who gained a lot from this painful experience. Share details about what you learned and how you grew both as a person and a professional. Often, the most devastating life events can turn out to be blessings. They create turning points that we otherwise would have never reached on our own.

This part of the discussion is where the majority of your time should be spent when answering the question.

  1. Explain what will be different now. It's almost inevitable that as a result of this experience, you'll be a different employee. Talk about that. How will you prevent this kind of thing from happening again in the future? What specific changes have you made in your own professional behavior to help ensure this isn't a recurring theme in your career?

Answer this question thoughtfully and with humility and your interviewer may even be on your side by the end.

You want to appear balanced and clearheaded in this conversation, so planning and practice are essential. Don't try to wing it. That's when people get emotional and trouble ensues.

Ultimately, remember that transparency will make this line of questioning end sooner. If your interviewer senses that you're holding something back, he or she will continue to probe and dig deeper until they're satisfied. Or, even worse, they'll write you off completely. Why run the risk of hiring someone who creates any feeling of uneasiness or suspicion when there are so many other qualified candidates to choose from?

Finally, keep your head held high. You are a strong candidate, even with this glitch in your record. Focus on your achievements and the things of which you're most proud. Interviewers understand that you're human and believe it, they've heard worse.

Chrissy Scivicque, the founder of EatYourCareer.com, believes work can be a nourishing life experience. As a career coach, corporate trainer, and public speaker, she helps professionals of all levels unlock their true potential and discover long-lasting career fulfillment.

Chrissy Scivicque, Contributor

Chrissy Scivicque believes that work can be a delicious, nourishing life experience – and she l... READ MORE Tags: careers, Interviewing, unemployment

ABOUT ON CAREERS Our expert contributors give their best advice on answering common interview questions, perfecting job applications, negotiating salary and more.

Find savvy job advice from the brains behind top careers blogs and websites, including Robin Reshwan, Jobhuntercoach, Career Sherpa, Ray Bixler, Hallie Crawford, Robin Madell and Peter Gudmundsson.

Edited by Rebecca Koenig.

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