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Hannah Hernandez
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After another interview today, I'm discouraged again because my severe ADHD interferes. Like anyone, I'm nervous and it causes my usual symptoms to become even worse. I'm always prepared before the interview; I have my answers ready, I review the impression I want to make, I have my questions prepared, but when I am in the interview, it's all rendered pointless.

I end up talking a lot, and too fast for my brain to keep up. I'll get off topic or my prepared answers don't come out right if at all. Or I end up being too vague. I talk so much that I get so eager and end up interrupting the hiring manager. If I do get to calmly address the question, my prepared answer slips my mind. I come off as unorganized. I'm really upset about it because I don't know how to help it. Practice interviews don't help because I don't have the same nervousness a real one has.

Outside an interview, I can manage it all fine. Though I do need a little bit longer of a learning period than most people, but after that, I can work the job just as well as anyone else. Sometimes ADHD is advantageous in the way that I can flip between tasks seamlessly, or hyperfocus on one thing that It gets done quick and precisely. I just suck at interviews.

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over 1 year ago
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Robert Westfall
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Part time self-employed odd job worker in Nephi

I know a few people who have ADHD, even within my own family, and I've seen them do amazingly well with things they enjoy. One sister, who still lives like me in our parents home, is GREAT at both art and writing, although she does need to have some help in spelling things out. She is a very creative person, to the point she DMs many D&D sessions on her discord servers a season! I recommend you find something you yourself are good or great at, even if you fly solo in order to do so. If it turns out to be in high demand or able to be sold or marketed in any form, THEN you can try going into that marketing scheme. But the first step would be to find a skill, talent, ability, or passion that works FOR YOU and not AGAINST YOU. Any disability can become a strength if you learn to hone those things that it offers you. #advice

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Tyler Sample
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Like I said I suffer with severe ADHD and it is not a laughing joke at all whatsoever but when you are the one turning it into a joke the proper before the interview starts it really is a big relief of anxiety and stress that goes away with having your ADHD in affect at that moment. So even though my ADHD was still bad, my anxiety and stress died down because of it and I was able to relax a little bit and breathe. Sorry I had to have this part and I apologize.

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Tyler Sample
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So I as well suffer from severe ADHD. I have the same exact problem. I was reading your post and I swear it was going back in time with my interviews. The best way that worked for me was whenever I got to the interview and I sat down with the manager or who I was speaking with right away I would let them know that I have ADHD and it affects me being able to just sit there and stay focused long enough to have a conversation not most likely during this interview I will get sidetracked a couple of times so just warning you now. And after doing a couple interviews you kind of turn it into a laughing joke not in a bad way though just a Icebreaker for an interview for sure and it did work to my advantage and the best way is possible.

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Phoebe Montrie
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✨A Bartender Who Loves Helping Others!✨

@Hannah Hernandez I agree with @Mike Corso! It is completely up to you, but disclosing this information at the beginning of the interview or on your application, could help you to feel more comfortable being yourself and help them understand where you're coming from! 💕

It sounds like you practice and prepare a lot beforehand, which is important, but I think practicing under similar conditions may help a little more. I think that @Dennis Taylor 's advice of doing a few interviews for jobs you don't want as much could be beneficial too!

And If you're receiving any mental healthcare related to you ADHD, check with your provider for advice as well, perhaps they would know specific techniques that could ease some of your symptoms! Good Luck! 💖

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Mike Corso
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Building a Community for People with Disability

@Hannah Hernandez Hi! From what you wrote you do your best to prepare for the interview. The stress of the interview seems to trigger you. Here is something to think about. I advocate that a person should only disclose their disability if it is beneficial to them. Maybe think about walking into an interview and while introducing yourself inform the hiring manager that you are a person with ADHD. That may relax you enough to focus better. Remember, only do that if you believe it will benefit you.

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Andre Simmons
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Line Cook at Feast

Personally for me KISS is major (keep it simple silly). I tell myself this all the time. Keep it short, to the point, and humorous. In order to slow myself down, I focus on my breathing. I take slow breaths while they are talking, and I try to keep my tempo steady. As many have said it’s really about practice. And being prepared..if it’s a video interview, I have sticky notes all around me in order so I can reference them easily.

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Armando Oakley
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Project Manager

Practice interviewing, ask your friends, or parents or adults you know to interview you. It's a skill. Work on it.

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Dennis Taylor
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Management Material

How many interviews have you done? It’s mostly practice. It seems you have prepared a lot which is great. Over time I became more relaxed. Make sure you are applying to a lot of positions, because if you interview for a position that you don’t care much about getting, it can help and be great practice while still being a real interview.

2y
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