Sheh Creature
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How does one find permanent employment these days that isn’t call center based?

I graduated college in the mid 90s with two useless bachelors degrees and immediately began office jobs. I then moved into insurance claims which I made good money doing. Unfortunately I became horrifically ill, had to go on long term medical leave and eventually lost my job.

After almost 2 years out of work, I found a temp job doing outbound calls for a call center and quickly moved up the ranks to team leader. Then they moved to another part of the country and I was unable to relocate.

This was 5 years ago and I have been unable to find permanent non-call center work since. I hate working in call centers where my every move is micromanaged like I’m a toddler and I went from being salaried at $50K a year to making $13 an hour with no benefits and can’t seem to break this cycle.

How does one find permanent, non call center work in 2019?

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over 2 years ago
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Beatrice Pesqueira

That isn't always easy to answer, but I can honestly say I do work in temp jobs. One I know my value and know that it is a foot in the door. It has been a lot easier for me since life always throws tantrums my way. Know your value. I won't ever do a call center in or out bound. Also wouldn't do cleaning or fast foods. There are jobs. Are they easy to find not always. Try a change of pace. Try a ware house job while you search for something worth being in. Bills do not wait. Best of wishes to you.

3y
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Andrew Reitemeyer

Try a coding bootcamp. Im thinking about going to one and becoming a Software Engineer

3y
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Andrew Pouliot

I'd think about finding a way to get back into the insurance industry if it worked well for you before. Also, check out online job assistance apps & discover which fields are in demand at the present time. What were your "worthless" degrees in? Maybe it's time to put one to good use.

3y
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Rafael Angel LopezFerrer Sr.

Sheh, you need to do your homework, no grade until then. I took the liberty of looking at your résumé, and it's blank! Also, have you looked for something other than call center work? I would look up your nearest America's Job Center, but you haven't posted your city, state, and ZIP Code. And what are your two majors? They may seem useless for call center work, but might be worth something in a different field.

While you're repairing that, go to https://www.careeronestop.org/ and find your nearest career center. They'll provide you with workshops and tools with which to get you out your call center rut. Also, evening classes at your local community college's continuing education department will give you different skills.

Don't think about it, do it!

3y
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Melissa Laquidara

I know how everyone feels. I lost my job back in 2013 never thought i would have to look for another job. I even went as far as telemarketing. I was a analyst. took servers down and back up. Analized numbers for a very big call center of 600 people. Im still not were i need to be. Im kind of giving up. I sold health insurance. I did very well at it.. But again it was sales. Im managing part time a deli but not what im good at. Im looking for a company that will hire me for my experience and not my schooling which is no college. I was taught by this company on how they want things done. They taught me which was a wonderful experience. Never thought i would be in this situation at 54 years old.

3y
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Cheryl Jones

My sympathies. I worked in a call center for a health insurance company for years and it truly sucked. We were micromanaged in every conceivable way. We had a "bathroom button" on our phone so that when we had to go to the bathroom, the team leader would time us. If we took more than 2 minutes, we were expected to explain "Sorry, I got my period," or "Sorry, I was constipated." Sometimes a supervisor would follow you into the bathroom and sit in the stall next to you and listen to you do your business. And that is only the beginning of the micromanaging! Call centers are truly horrid places to work.
Since the callers were medical billers checking on their claims, I was able to transfer what I learned in the call center and I became a medical biller in my next job. It took a little convincing during the interview, though.

3y
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Ashley Wilson

Hi Sheh Creature ! I completely understand how you feel. I graduated with a Master's degree and could not find work teaching for awhile. I actually resorted to cleaning houses for a summer to pay off student loans it was a giant mess. Now I am at a job that I love which isn't even in the educational world where I started out. My advice is to transfer the skills you already have into a new field. For me, I went to school to teach English Language Arts so writing was something I loved to do. This transferred easily right into my next role.

The important thing to remember is you don't ever lose the skills, experience, or the education you have gained! You just take those things and transfer them into your next desired role. You may seem like you're not the perfect fit for the role at first, but don't panic!

Here are some things you can do:

Check the job description If you’re not sure which skills you should include for a particular role check the job description and see what they are looking for! Add any of the skills you have gained along the way that matches the job description to your resume ASAP. Below are a few examples of skills that you can transfer: -Leadership -Motivation -Time management -Delegation -Communication -Research

Show proof Make sure once you add a skill to your resume that you show how you performed it at your previous job in the experience section. Take a look at the example below: -You have: "Leadership skills." -You prove it: "Excellent leadership skills, demonstrated when I successfully managed a small team of individuals over the course of a three-day event." Don't just tell them what you did but how.

Make a list of your job duties Create a list of your current (if applicable) and recent past job duties that pertain to the new role. Think about what you were responsible for on a daily basis. Which tasks and duties did you perform and also which ones did you fulfill that were outside what you were hired for? Give yourself some time and write it ALL down.

Record your accomplishments Make sure to highlight the results you achieved in your past positions. Particularly when you're changing industries, prospective employers will care more about what you actually accomplished, and less about how you specifically did it. Did your boss recognize you at some point? Did you save a colleague time by helping he or she complete a project? Did you boost sales at your last job? Think of achievements that are both large and small. They ALL matter to your next employer! Bonus points if you have numbers to back it up.

Wishing you the best! You have got this!!

Let me know how else I can help. : )

3y
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