Michael Carvalho
13 days ago
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#MyThoughts

Saturday Thoughts,

Start the day with new thoughts and believe all things are possible. Stop saying I can’t when you can do whatever you believe in. Never take No for an answer.

How to bounce back after a job loss Losing a job, no matter the reason, can be a blow to your ego as well as your finances.

Even if you saw it coming, having everything change so quickly can be incredibly shocking. Give yourself space and time to remind yourself what you’re good at, where your value lies, and start to dream about what’s possible.

Take care of yourself A job loss can stir up all kinds of negative emotions: shame, doubt, anger, self-pity. After all, you’ve lost more than a paycheck, you’ve lost your daily routine, social interactions with coworkers, and possibly even your sense of mission and purpose. It’s OK to feel bad for a little while. Vent to friends and acquaintances, indulge in a little comfort food, and then it’s time to pick yourself up and keep going. Self-care is an important step in the aftermath of a job loss. Taking care of yourself is a must, particularly if you have dependents who rely on you. Feeling grief and loss is normal, but you can get to the other side of the grieving process with time. Here are a few ways to help get your mind and emotions on track after a job loss: Tell people what happened - Talking about it can help you feel better—but it also lets people know you’re available for other opportunities. A job loss happens to nearly everyone at some point in their career. Your friends and former coworkers may have suggestions on future jobs. Look for learning opportunities - Is there a new skill, practice, or competency you can work on? What can you take away from this experience that can improve your life in the future? Maintain—and start—healthy habits - Focus on eating right, getting plenty of exercise, and maintaining a regular sleep pattern. That can help keep you sharp and focused for the job search process. Focus on the future - Often, a job loss isn’t a reflection on your personal performance as much as it is an unfortunate consequence of factors outside of your control. Focus on what’s ahead, not what happened in the past. Pace yourself - Don’t burn yourself out and get shortsighted so that you lose perspective. Decide how many hours a day you’ll dedicate to job searches, networking, interviewing, self-discovery, and leave room in your life for family, friends, simple pleasures, volunteering, or whatever is important to you. Consider if you can learn anything from this experience. Every situation is different and sometimes things really are unavoidable. Getting feedback from trusted former colleagues can help you identify your biggest strengths and areas for growth.

Get back in the game Ready to go back on the job hunt? A good approach is to learn from previous experiences: Get feedback and evaluate what worked (and what didn’t) in your former job, then take the steps to course-correct and adjust so you can learn from those situations. Be realistic about your timeline and prospects. A job search can take longer than expected, but you can improve your chances by being more open-minded about your next step. Being too narrow in your search, or too choosy about options, may unnecessarily lengthen your job search. Finally, consider the idea that reigniting a job search is a job of its own, so treat it as such. Structuring your day around a reliable routine can help you stay motivated and thwart feelings of hopelessness.

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John Biddle
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Good post!

1w
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Michael Carvalho
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Read my post relating to it!

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