Elyssa Duncan
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What is a personality test?
Last updated: August 14, 2022
Elyssa Duncan
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What is a personality test?
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Have you ever heard of someone referring to themselves as an ENFJ or an INFP - and wondered what those cryptic-sounding letter combinations mean? Chances are they’re referring to their personality types based on their Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment results.

What is The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment?

The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator is a self-reporting personality test based on psychological attributes and is often used to sort individuals into one of 16 different “personality types.”

Based on the answers you provide in the assessment, it gives you a four-letter code that is aimed to help you learn more about yourself and understand your personality, including likes and dislikes, strengths and weaknesses, compatibility with other people, and even possible career paths!

There are various sites you can use to figure out your personality type at no cost, including 16Personalities and Truity. These tests are based on the foundation of the original Myers Briggs criteria, with a bit of a modern spin.

The 16 personality types explained

There are four main personality classifications or psychological scales that the test uses to determine a personality type. The results will pick one choice from each category to create your specific type.

1. Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I)

This is related to our flow of energy and the way we interact with those around us.

  • Extraverts prefer stimulation from events, things, and people external from them.
  • Introverts prefer self-examination and private reflection.

2. Sensing (S) or INtuition (N)

This involves the way we take in information.

  • Sensing people often use their five senses to interpret the world.
  • Intuitive people rely more on instincts, hunches, and feelings.

3. Thinking (T) or Feeling (F)

This is how we make decisions.

  • Thinking personalities use objective criteria and logic to make decisions.
  • Feeling personalities use values and personal feelings to make decisions.

4. Judging (J) or Perceiving (P)

This indicates the way we deal with the outside world.

  • Judging people like structure, plans, and strict organization.
  • Perceiving people take a more relaxed, laid-back approach and more welcoming of change.

Each type is then listed by a combination of the four-letter choices. If you already know what your personality type is, click the links below to learn more about your type and the best job paths for you!

ISTJISFJINFJINTJ
ISTPISFPINFPINTP
ESTPESFPENFPENTP
ESTJESFJENFJENTJ

Learning about your personality can help you better understand yourself and figure out what motivates and energizes you. This insight can improve your relationship with others and help you identify and control your behaviors and work style.

The assessments are a great way to help you think about your career goals and abilities, especially those resume-boosting soft skills that are becoming increasingly important to potential employers!

Having a better understanding of your inner workings can benefit your career planning at every stage, from choosing your first job to making a career change and even figuring out which company would be best for you!

If you are interested in learning more about finding which jobs would be best for you based on your personality type, check out our Personality Based Job Search Resource Center!

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Elyssa Duncan
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Ford Simpson

Hi Elyssa,, I am the kind of person that does the opposite of what I am told. As a scientist feelings were useless. Facts and figures were paramount. Discovery of new theories that more than likely proved you wrong was common. Change was and is the norm. Proof of new things is very rewarding and necessary. I could go on but you get the idea,Ford

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Jose Pena

This is good advice. I remember taking the Myers Briggs Test at least after I graduated from college. I remember the test said I was an ISFP.

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