Ashley Wilson
Follow
How and when to follow up after an interview
Last updated: October 5, 2022
Ashley Wilson
Follow
Follow
Like
Comment
Share
How and when to follow up after an interview
Jump to section

The job interview is the first step to securing a new career. It's important to make a good impression and stand out from the other candidates. But the job interview is only the beginning. The real work starts after the interview is over.

Following up after a job interview is essential to the success of your job hunt. It shows that you are interested in the position and willing to put in the extra effort to get it. This article will discuss why you should follow up after a job interview and how to do it effectively.

Why should I follow up after an interview?

Following up after an interview is a critical aspect of the job-seeking process. It does a few things. It lets the employer know you’re serious and keeps the hiring process moving along. A follow-up is also a great way to include any final thoughts you may have neglected to mention during the interview or hiring process that you’d like to highlight.

You should consider following up with the employer even if you don't think the interview went well. This is an exciting opportunity to turn a negative experience into a positive one.

If you are not chosen for the position, a follow-up shows that you are eager and willing to learn. It also allows you to ask for feedback to improve in the future.

When you consider that it can take 20 to 40 days to receive an offer after a job interview, it’s clear there are ample opportunities to follow up after the meeting.

You can send a thank-you card, connect with the hiring manager online professional websites, or write a handwritten letter. These are all great options, but the most important thing is to be genuine, polite, and interested in the position.


(Image Source)

How long should I wait to follow up after an interview?

The general rule is to follow up within 24–48 hours after the interview. This shows that you are interested and excited about the opportunity. It also allows you to send a thank-you note while the interview is still fresh in the hiring manager's mind.

If you don't hear back from the employer within a week or two, it is appropriate to follow up again. You can call or email to inquire about the status of the position and express your continued interest.

When you do follow up with an employer after an interview, be sure to:

Thank the interviewer for their time

It's important to be grateful for the opportunity to interview, even if you don't get the job. Keeping a positive attitude is also an excellent way to make a lasting impression.

Mention what you enjoyed during the interview

This is an opportunity to build rapport with the hiring manager and make a connection. It will also help them remember who you are.

Inquire about the next steps in the hiring process

Asking about the next steps shows that you are still interested in the position and want to be kept in the loop.

Highlight your qualifications

If you forget to mention something important during the interview, now is your chance to bring it up. This is also a good opportunity to elaborate on your experience and skills.

Express your interest in the position

Make it clear that you are still interested in the job and would like to be considered.

Send a thank-you card

A thank-you note is a great way to show your appreciation for the opportunity to interview and to keep your name in front of the employer.

Following up after an interview is a crucial step for any job seeker. Taking these steps allows you to clarify any points from the interview, express your interest in the job, and thank the interviewer for their time.

(Image Source)

How to follow up after a job interview

The best way to follow up after an interview is to send a thank-you note to the interviewer within 24 hours. This shows that you are interested in the position and are grateful for their time. The thank-you note is also a great opportunity to mention anything you may have forgotten to say during the interview.

There are additional ways to follow up, with some of the most popular options including:

Email

You can use email to send a thank-you note, inquire about the next steps in the hiring process, or express your interest in the job. This is considered one of the most professional ways to follow up.


(Image Source)

Try to emphasize your key qualifications and skills in your follow-up email and pick a thank-you template to help you land the job. If you plan to send a follow-up email to the interviewer or recruiter, gather their contact information prior to leaving the interview.

Phone call

You can also follow up with a phone call, especially if you had a phone interview with the company. This is a good option if you want to speak to someone directly. When you make a phone call, be sure to be polite and brief. You can thank the interviewer for their time and express your interest in the job.

Calling may be more personal than a follow-up email, but it can also come across as more assertive. Remember to wait at least 24 hours before following up via phone call.

In-person

If you happen to bump into the interviewer in person, this is an excellent opportunity to follow up. Be sure to be polite and professional. You can mention something you enjoyed about the interview or inquire about the next steps in the process.

Try not to show up unannounced, as this may be seen as intrusive or could interrupt their schedule. If you need to schedule another meeting with the recruiter, reach out and see if you can schedule an appointment with them.

Tips for interview follow-up

Here are some tips to keep in mind when following up after an interview.

Be prompt

Following up promptly after an interview shows that you are interested in the position and eager to hear back. Try to do so 24–48 hours after via phone or email. While an in-person follow-up is an option, try not to show up to the company without an appointment.

Be professional

No matter how you follow up, be sure to remain professional. This includes being polite and courteous at all times. Keeping a friendly and positive attitude is a great way to build professional relationships. Networking is important in nearly every industry, highlighting the importance of a genuine professional relationship.

Keep the conversation brief

When following up, make sure to keep your message short and to the point. You don't want to intrude or interfere with the interviewer's schedule. Even if the interaction feels short, it’s enough to emphasize your interest in the position.

Know when to stop

If you don't hear back from the employer after a few attempts, it's probably best to move on. Continuing to follow up may come across negatively and can start to affect your mental health. There will be other opportunities that are a good fit.

The bottom line is that following up after an interview is a must. You can show your interest in the position and stand out from the competition by following up. Just be sure to do it professionally and courteously.

Steps you can take before leaving an interview

While interview follow up is important, there are also steps you can take before leaving the interview itself. With the average number of job applicants per opening falling at 250 people, it's clear how important it is to stand out from the crowd. These steps can help you make a good impression and improve your chances of getting the job.

1. Make sure you're prepared

This includes doing your research, dressing appropriately, and arriving on time. It can also be helpful to bring physical copies of your resume and work samples with you to the interview. You want to ensure that you're keeping a positive attitude and putting your best foot forward.

2. Practice your interview skills

Practicing your interview skills is extremely important. This includes knowing how to answer common interview questions and being able to sell yourself effectively. It can be hard to prepare for an interview, but having confidence in your skills and experience is important.

3. Be engaged

During the interview, try to make eye contact, sit straight, and avoid fidgeting. You want to show that you're interested and engaged in the conversation.


(Image Source)

4. Ask questions

This is your opportunity to learn more about the company and position. Asking additional questions also shows that you're prepared and have done your research.

5. Optimize your resume

Keywords are a great way to ensure that your resume gets noticed. Nearly 75% of job applicants are eliminated by applicant tracking systems (ATS), showing how important it is to utilize keywords. Use keywords that are relevant to the position you're applying for.

6. Take notes

Taking quick notes during the initial interview can help you remember important details later on. It also shows that you're paying attention and are interested in the job.

7. Follow up

As mentioned before, following up after an interview is crucial in the process. This is your chance to thank the interviewer for their time and express your interest in the job.

If you take the time to do these things, you'll be sure to make a good impression. Following up after an interview is important, but there are also steps you can take before leaving the interview itself.

(Image Source)

Stay patient throughout the interview process

Following up after an interview is a key step in the job search process. You can show your interest in the position and stand out from the competition by following up. Just be sure to do it professionally and courteously.

You can also take steps before leaving the interview itself that can help you make a good impression and improve your chances of getting the job. If you are ready to submit your resume to land a new job, try using the Jobcase search to find a job near you.

27
2 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Ashley Wilson
Follow
Follow

Comments

Anthony Koomson

I did that and the person who was hiring thought I was too desperate. I know they say the landscape has changed that there are more jobs than employees but in certain fields that is not the case and some hiring managers do not take constant follow up well. So yes I agree, it would be good to work for yourself

45w
Like
Reply
1
Stacks Fafi

LolI work for myself

1y
Like
Reply
Add
Related Articles
10
5 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Follow
Community Specialist
42
4 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Heath Alva
Community Specialist
Follow
Community Specialist
26
6 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Follow
Community Specialist
10
1 Comment
Like
Comment
Share
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Follow
Community Specialist
343
188 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Lara Grant
Contributor
Follow
Contributor
16
2 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Elyssa Duncan
Community Specialist
Follow
Community Specialist
11
4 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Michael Frash
Community Specialist
Follow
Community Specialist
14
Like
Comment
Share