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Jakub Marynowski

I am not against employers checking Facebook or other public site. It’s important to know that your right to privacy is out the window when posting online for the world to see.

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dominic wilcox

It would not surprise me. At my retail job my manager and I would look at Facebook right after viewing the application.

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Mike Bee

Why are you doing thing online that would be considered negative to the company? Anything you do online should be legal, non political and nice. Anything not that will come back to jab you in the rear end at some point. I give you the case of the current CEO of twitter and his comments on white people of 10 years ago as an example online that should never have been put online.

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Brian Owens

No they don't. It would take up way too much resources to do that and they don't have the budget or the time. Now they may do that if you're seeking a corporate position or upper management but other than that they look at your resume and if you make it to an interview they get a read on your personality and determine if you will fit in. Your going to be slinging bags of feed not welcoming dignitaries.

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Rembold Eric

According to a study by CareerBuilder, nearly 70% of employers screen their candidates using social media and what’s more surprising is 57% of employers are less likely to even contact applicants who lack an online presence.

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Stefan Hearst

We live in a new society where employers have easy access to many online websites and the most common appear to be Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter or others.

Anything you say or photos you post can easily be "filtered" and "searchable" as many employers will pay for this feature that is available to them by all the online public websites. This is why everyone's profile and information is important to companies and governments all over the world but mainly China and Russia and they attempt to sell you products or influence your beliefs or purchasing decisions and you would not be aware of it. The U.S. government can care less UNLESS you have a record with any law-enforcement agency.

I learned from neighbours and friends that their children's DUI's or police encounters and records may be on several websites such as MUGSHOTS with their photos and there is nothing that can be done to remove them as this is public record.

All people should be cautious with what they post on any online website as it may have the potential to damage their reputation and cause others to doubt their integrity and honesty and moral character.

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Mattie Comer

Rule of Thumb...if it's on Facebook, Twitter, etc., It's public. Be careful what you brag/boast about as the impact on your future can be unpleasant.

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B Rubenski

Why do people have public profiles if they want privacy?? They can only see it if you have not fixed your settings to private.

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Judith Clausen

Well they know that some people go online, just for kicks. Trolls are people that intentionally harass others, make rude insulting remarks, and generally cause trouble. Of course, you don't want to project THAT type of image. Also, 25-100 friends is an acceptable amount. More than that says you spend most of your time on FB/ Meta, just making friends.

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Troy Weatherspoon

I'm pretty sure they do check your social media personalities. Make sure your posts are presentable, use disclaimers, have fun but don't overdo your activity with personality. Use discretion. They can review the activity but usually not with the same rigidness as information such as your credit reporting and other background findings.

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