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Kaylin Berry
about 1 month ago
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Perfectionist Boss/Derogatory Commentary

So I work for a pretty large network, akin to a government facility so there are lots of people i have worked with and met over the 3 years working here part time: Im 23 and just graduated from college and am more looking for full time positions. My former head supervisor was an amazing women like a second mother, truly a nurture and she taught me so much in the 2 years we worked together, sadly she left in July. Her second in command is about 27/28 and can into the scene about same time and so we have all worked together for 2 years. With my supervisor leaving her next in command was into her position, leaving a full time opening. I applied for this. Prior to applying I have applying to several over job openings in the network and not heard much back. As the change of command has shifted so has the relationship with my boss. It is as if she has become on the lookout for my mistakes. At one I was discussing life and living and she makes a comment about how I am a “child” and how I “ can’t even get an apartment” mind you I work part time, and she said this with all seriousness. On another point she texted me saying she would be writing me up because I didn’t not clock in or out and it would result in a suspension, even though I was not working. Also she made a comment about how she had not seen anything impressive in the time she has worked with me, and how despite most it being covid and things being shut down for a lot of the time we worked together. It was as if the only thing she could see was my age and my mistakes when she looks at me. At one point she mentioned how, “whenever she sees me doing nothing she’s going to make note for my evaluation”. Of which thankfully a higher supervisor sat in with. I have started to send weekly email reports with all the things in the week I accomplished in order to show her my part in this job since she chooses to ignore it. I know bevahe of this attitude I would not have gotten the job. But I still believe I shouldn’t have to deal with this. I’ve been shorted my hours, scheduled the worst shifts, but I work for a GREAT purpose and I adored my job before she came into command. I frankly work my butt off for these people and give them alot of my holidays and TONS of my weekends and I would appreciate a little respect. Please tell me if I’m losing my cool over nothing. #management #advice #coworkers # #workenvironment #stressful #interview

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Gary Levin

Your boss is trying to impress someone above her. She is not a good leader. Find another position when you can. Start the search today

6w
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Grace Ayres

You’re in a hostile work environment. If you want to stay with the company then take legal steps, if not then look for another position at another company. One would think with the country at a low on employees (at least in the US, not sure where you are) that employers would treat their employees better.

6w
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Kristina Rosales

Do you and I work at the same company?! Seems all so familiar 🤔

Bottom line- it never feels good when you feel the need to defend your value/workload. Truth is, your supervisor is probably not “wrong” but probably not entirely “right” either. When you are feeling this way, the efficiency of everything you do will also be hindered. Work on your confidence in who you are! You are amazing, own that and let your light shine to reinstate your core values. The rest will work itself out. Changes could be a full time position, new job altogether, and/or by creating positive working relationships. When you regain your confidence, you’ll make the best decision for you.

6w
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Joyce White

Time to get another job if all these things have happened. Always look like you are doing something. Use time management to fake her out. Learn to deal with bad bosses. First, not do be afraid to lose a job. It may be time for to go. We are always going to have bosses that are not great ok. I have had both. And I make sure I get what I need. Save your money start looking for another job. You got that job and you will get another one. Develop different skills sets. Many times, bosses have their own issues that have nothing to do with you. Every boss does not have to like you ok. As a young person, learn how to deal with your own emotions when you are dealing with someone that does not treat you good. You only have control over you, not her. But you can create an illusion that you do. Find out what she likes, dislikes, or hates. Then you create a situation where you make her look good. ok Then she will fear you. And bring her a gift and pray over it.

6w
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Mark Adcock

It sounds to me like she is jealous of you, your youth, etc. so, her problem, not yours, except when she is making it yours. Stay awesome and good luck.

6w
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Kathleen Griffin

Ask to be transferred out of her department if possible. Then she’ll see how much you do when she has to train a new employee.

6w
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EDDIE GOMEZ

I've worked in government facilities. They're not the best places to work if you have free will and thought. Don't be smarter or faster than the rest. If not it's a whole bunch of politics involved. No matter how much work you do, it will never be enough. Part time employees or contracted employees are there to "do the work they don't want to" or tell you to do. Your supervisor has issues. You shouldn't have to be sending her work logs. Start keeping work logs for yourself. Get transferred if possible. Pretty soon she'll start getting other employees involved than you'll become the problem. Make sure you keep messages, recordings whatever you feel is going to help you when it comes time to file a grievance or see H.R., to be an ass I would start cc bcc her supervisor and H.R. you might make her more pissed off but hopefully they will approach you on why you're cc/bcc them or attach a note stating why you are. It might piss her off but now she knows her superiors know she's bullying you.

6w
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Joyce White

My employees are like family. However, sometimes they take the relationship for granted. Not coming work when there is a deadline; Coming to work stoned; and lying to me. I don't fire them but I let them know I'm still in charge I do expect that they respect the job, not me but the job. She may have a lot more pressure than when you were equals. Stop thinking about the past and focus on the present. Take her to lunch and give her a card. "Remember when we were close. I miss our friendship" and nothing more. When you come to work keep your emotion in check. Keep a stoic face. And see if she changes. Being a boss is hard. My employees do not know when I'm under pressure. So think about. Children never talk about the past because they stay in the present. You will never hear a seven yr. old say, "why didn't you play with me yesterday?' Stay in the present.

6w
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ERIN PADLEY

Erin P Keep a journal and make an entry every day..Don’t risk Miss Bossy finding it, either! So this should not be stored in a computer, lest she does exactly that! Instead, keep a handwritten journal and keep it in your purse.. when you get about a month’s worth of juicy stories, approach, approach Miss Bossy’s supervisor and ask him/her to make some time for a private meeting with you. Don’t spill the beans as to the topic that will be discussed. Save it for the meeting. Just say it’s a personnel matter and you are requesting that it be kept confidential until such time when Miss Bossy ought to be confronted by HER boss. Good luck with it. Don’t let that bully run you over! And, come to think of it: That would be a good term to use when speaking to Miss Bossy’s supervisor: Tell him/ her that you feel that you are being BULLIED! And use exactly that word bcuz NO reasonable person has any respect for a bully!

5w
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Carrie Griffes

Kaylin, The relationship has changed. She is adjusting to her new position, responsibilities, and possibly even insecurities. Remember, she has to adjust to new bosses now too. Talk to her, tell her how your feeling in a mater of fact way that is not confrontational. Tell her that while the relationship has changed you believe the two of you can still work with each other as a team if you respect each other as people and coworkers.

It couldn't hurt to mention some of the things you respect her for either. For example; My prior, immediate supervisor, knew her job well and did it well. I told her so in a conversation we had. I left out anything negative, and we built our relationship on respect. It worked for a while anyway.

2w
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