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Harley Blakeman ⚖️
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I help people with criminal records find jobs faster!

Interviewing with a felony is frustrating for many reasons. You want to be upfront and honest about your past, but you don’t want to eliminate your chances of getting the position. At Honest Jobs, our purpose is to minimize this stress throughout the hiring process and match you with second-chance employers who are open to accepting your situation.

It is important for you to understand how to explain your background in terms of the values you have gained and the lessons you have learned through your experiences with the criminal justice system. As long as you’re honest about your record and can prove to employers that you’ve turned your life around, many will give you a chance.

Here are tips on how to interview with a felony record:

  1. Be Honest

Unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all approach when it comes to interviewing with a criminal background, since a lot depends on the type of crime and the employer interviewing you. However, we suggest being upfront and honest as soon as you have the opportunity to talk about your background. This approach takes more time, effort, and resilience, but getting hired after being honest with your interviewer lays the foundation for a solid reputation and career with the company. Additionally, most people will appreciate your honesty and the fact that you are working hard to overcome past mistakes.

  1. The C.O.D.C. Storyline

Following the C.O.D.C. storyline can help you explain your background resulting in a positive outcome.

C = Circumstances: What was your life like before the crime?

Explain what may have led to you committing a crime. There are many factors, such as depression, hard times, or hanging out with the wrong crowd that even people without a criminal record can often relate to. Understanding the circumstances can help your interviewer to see past the crime and focus more on your potential.

O = Ownership: Take responsibility for the crime and punishment.

After you have communicated where you were in life at the time of your offense, make sure you demonstrate taking responsibility for your actions. You want your interviewer to know that you recognize the importance of your punishment and any positive effects it had on your character.

D = Development: What have you learned from your mistakes?

Once you have explained how your punishment affected you, point out 3-4 things you have done/are doing to turn your life around. Your family, work, school, church, community, and personal passions are excellent topics to talk about. Do your best to relate these things to the job for which you are interviewing. For example, you could share how hard you've worked to rebuild your relationship with your family, and you are excited by the opportunity to be able to financially support them if hired.

C = Change: What actions you have taken to better yourself?

Summarize who you are now and what you have to offer. Highlight your personal mission and values to show that your actions are built on a solid foundation. The hiring decision often comes down to the candidate’s core values and personality. Also, remember to talk in terms of the job position you are applying for when explaining what skills and abilities you have.

  1. Follow the Employer’s Lead

After you have disclosed your background, some employers won’t ask for additional details about your criminal record, or they might only want to focus on job-related topics like the skills you gained during incarceration. If this is the case, be honest, but only share the details you feel are important for them to understand your situation. There's no need to overshare what happened in the past. The interview should focus on your skills and how you can contribute to the employer, rather than thoroughly explaining your offense. #secondchances #secondchance #criminalrecord # # #

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about 2 years ago
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Melissa coleman
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Manager at Sonic Drive In

I am currently going though this right now. We have done the initial interview and the man interviewing me said in his opinion I was a perfect candidate for the position. My only issue is that one of the job requirements was a clean criminal record. I did let him know I did not have a clean criminal record and it said it was okay we could still continue the process.

1y
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Corey Moore
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Harley tell us about yours dont be shy

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Corey Moore
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Alright sounds good

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Jessica Minder
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Freelancer at Self

Drug felonies. Alot of employers don't want people who have drug selling felonies. All my skills are related to and in fields that because of my felony I have no chance of going back to. Trying to explain manufacturing to people is hard. It feels like as soon as you say possessions and manufacturing drugs, they don't hear a single thing after. No matter how phenomenal your skills or lengthy the previous experience. The job market just doesn't seem designed for people to risr above. Your limited to what professions/jobs you can even apply for. Your even restricted when it comes to continuing education. So how are people supposed to do better than where they came from? It's extremely embarrassing, discouraging and difficult. Now I do understand why some never shed the criminal life. I just can't imagine living that way. I made a mistake trying to survive. I know I was wrong and accept my punishment. But America seems to really have things designed for failure.

2y
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Alyssa Young
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Social Justice

The Lord will open door!

2y
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Kenneth Bishop
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Production Worker at Grimmway Farms

Thank you Harley for taking the time out to be Honest. I do understand my terms and as well to explain my past but as it comes to having a background check that the company hires to do a background check for them, just consider not to hire. I did do pretty much as you explained but brief. I even had a notarized letter of a program that I am in to help with my rehabilitation. (As to what am I doing/done to become a Man and not a Little boy.) Sorry I don't mean it as it sounds but it can be frustrating as it is my past not my future.

2y
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Amanda Somerville
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Customer Service

I really really appreciate this! I'm hoping that having 10 years alcohol free will help make me look good! I'm going to ride on that.

2y
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Ronna Fraser
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I have a misdemeanor and companies do NOT care and no explanation will fix it.

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Joanne WACHIRA
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Amen. Thank you for sharing the CODC storyline.

2y
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Arnie Nelson
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Old Timing Man

Redemption and belief in our Savior Jesus Christ.

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