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Monique Montano
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Intake Cordinator

Does anyone know where I can get information regarding this such as what the labor laws say?

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almost 8 years ago
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James Gilreath
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Order Selector at Disc Logistics

If yu cant use your own resources to find something as basic as the labor commission, then u shouldnt b working!get a clue!

8y
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Tiffany B
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I'm unsure what the labor laws cover I will say when your working in a environment that's toxic it becomes unhealthy and effect no only you but your family. I suggest you removing yourself from the situation your life means more than what being offered I can bet you that...become your own boss !

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Stephen Watrous
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Assembly at Ranstad

contact the labor board they can guide you

8y
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Jesse Strong
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Key Holder Night Host at Cascade Management

Monique, do you belong to a union or some other employee organization? That would be a place to start, along with talking with your supervisor unless he's the problem. Then maybe a plan to find another job and set up an appointment to have a candid conversation with whomever is causing the problem and see if it's just a misunderstanding. But definitely don't continue to work under such stressful conditions unless you have no other choice.

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Kirsten Cristiano
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Commercial Real Estate Executive Assistant

Document every incident and seek legal council asap You need to write it all down.

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Gary Wipperman
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Monique, a hostile work environment falls under U.S. Title VII of employment law. No person, male or female, black, white, Asian, Indiant, whatever should be subjected to a hostile work environment.

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whtuqt ater
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All I Know thru experience os that if you are forced to quit you may be eligible for unemployment. document times and dates of all incidents. Good luck

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Malissa Long
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Sewn Production Supervisor

Fill a grievance, have a paper trail. If they desiderate to fire you. You will need that for unemployment. I was threatened at work by a coworker. How my boss reacted was sickening. He wouldn't terminate the person and I had to work in a hostile environment for a short period. Had I not gotten out I would have file a complaint with the state and persued legal action. Though that would have been an extreme measure that I was afraid would hamper me the rest of my life, even though I was the victim. Workers rights are very limited. Good luck to you, I wish you the best.

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JB Blank
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Safety Consultant / Safety Recovery Specialist

The FIRST places to check for any laws referencing this issue are the Department of Labor and Department of Justice websites. It also might be useful to e-mail and contact the EEOC, and obtain a response concerning the matter.

Any information from ANY other website is just going to be 'opinion' UNLESS that information includes the specific Title and Section of the applicable Federal or State Law. It does NOT matter if that opinion comes from what may be thought of as a 'respected' magazine or 'legal site'. If the specific Title and Sections are not provided, it's ONLY that author's opinion, and quite often those opinions are grossly incorrect.

That said, here is the link to the specific page for the Seattle Business Magazine article regarding the issue, rather than just a general link to SBM:

http://www.seattlebusinessmag.com/business-corners/workplace/when-does-workplace-qualify-being-hostile

The article speaks more to generalities, but is well worth the read.

Again generally, 'hostile workplace' charges are quite often difficult to prove. And since it's a civil rather than criminal matter, the burden is upon the claimant to substantiate their claim. While the charge may very well be valid, often it's done in a 'low key' manner, so others may not witness the negative actions, and co-workers may be reluctant to step forward even if they did witness the conduct, fearing that they may lose their own jobs.

As noted by others, often the best course of action is to just seek employment elsewhere, if that's possible. Any claimant will be fighting an uphill battle, particularly so if the charge is directed against the employer itself, as (obviously) the employer will, typically, immediately and vehemently deny any such conduct from itself.

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isaac Gloria
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well each state varies more or less they are all the same to a certain extent on this issue. what you need to do if you want email me and i am an insurance adjuster i can evaluate or assess the actual Hostility and classification if you would like and give you what options i would suggest or let you know what it or isn't possible in certain cases and under certain circumstances.... where do you work, city, state, etc. email me a bit abotu the situation isaacgloria88@yahoo.com... if its that bad don't hesitate to contact me i am licensed in all 50 states. im sorry to hear this and if you are not crying wolf then take action quickly and the longer you wait the longer it happens the worse you look when you actually make your move and even worse when you have no knowledge or anyone with knowledge to back you up with the right information. i wouldn't mind and as you can assume by my email my name is isaac gloria!

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