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Advice

I plan on working with staffing agencies since my restaurant position was eliminated over a language barrier related misunderstanding. Any advice on how to address then when I meet with recruiters at local staffing agencies in the central coast?

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Maricruz Smith
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Honesty is the best policy and we all have to state the truth. Recruiters are intelligent enough to acknowledge it is not a perfect world and we are entitled to our own opinions. "Freedom of Speech".

3y
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Mr. Bailey, look you live in a state where understanding multi languages will be an issue most of the time. Cheer up do you think that you're the only one with that issue? Real quick here.... My very very first rescue job in Florida stated in the announcement that you HAD! to speak Spanish to apply... Well I do speak Spanish. But my boss was from Venezuela..... American schools teach the dialect of someone from Spain or what they say is PROPER Spanish. He went to HR while I was on a 911 call and told them that I lied on my application about being able to speak Spanish. I didn't say anything. I reported to work the next day with my NSU and FL. International University transcript with the 3 A's and 2 B's in both Spanish and French. They fired him and I promise you that I made him look stupid as I walked back to my road unit and proceeded to my next call from dispatch. Don't lie... Just be you.... I'm well trained and I see that you to have an education. Now sell yourself. Be you. Nobody can do or be you better than YOU!!

3y
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Feel like the falcons in 4th quarter

I applied for a position and was called by the recruiter of the company. I thought we really hit it off and she told me that out of 150 applicants I had been rated by the hiring team as having the best resume and most industry experience. I had mentioned that I had bern considering chsnging to a different industry. She then said, "no, we're not going to let you do that", She then scheduled a phone interview with the hiring manager for top 5 applicants and she would choose for 3 to come in and interview with 4 different people. I had the phone interview and was called back for the face to face interview. I got to choose when I wanted to come in of the available times because I was "still # 1. I chose the fitst appt. I thought I had great interviews. They all went over the allotted times. I sent a thsnk you note to all. I didn't get the job. I asked for feedback so that I could hopefully improve. The recruiter said she hadn't gotten feedback but that she would and get back to me. She never has. I feel kind of mistreated. Like I was ahead through the 3rd quarter and then git blindsided. Any advice or opinions?

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Janet Underwood
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Sorry to hear that. Maybe you can contact the recruiter again to try to get the feedback?

3y
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Woodrow W. Cain, II
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Kim,

This happens more often than not. One, the recruiter is not your friend they are hired by the company to send candidates and are paid a commission based on your base salary. The more you are offered the higher their commission.

Did you copy the thank you's you sent to your recruiter? Did you discuss compensation at any time other than with your recruiter? Hiring managers will press you to discuss compensation citing that they want to see if you are both on the same page. Experienced an interview in which it would have been a cut in pay and expressed it to my recruiter, before the actual face to face interviews commenced the HR manager made it known that they were firm on the rate prior to proceeding to the interview by the next three managers. His tone was extremely hostile and it required three weeks to get an interview initially.

If at any point in the process you leave out the recruiter you are on your own and a free agent. Unfortunately, companies rarely hire free agents and most will not direct hire but impose a contract to hire clause which now averages six months to a year.

Second, the company is not obligated to discuss why you were not chosen for legal reasons do not expect any specifics. Too many companies will post a position with no intention of choosing an outside hire but will hire an internal candidate. I recently experienced that for two positions within one company and both positions were filled internally. This is a huge saving to the company in benefits and compensation. Most HR departments will promote in small increments but not large raises, the days of mailroom to the board room are gone.

Third, never put your eggs in one basket work with as many recruiters as possible. Stack your interviews for at least three a week. If after a week no feedback move on. I had one company tell me they will not make a decision for 8 weeks, really.......

Good luck, hope this helped.

3y
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Out of state recruiter

Hello All, Lately I've been getting calls from recruiters in response to a submission of my resume for a position that is near me. I noticed that multiple recruiters call me for the same position some are even out of state. How does this work? Do employers actually use out of state recruiters and why would multiple recruiters call me for the same position? To make things more confusing they all say "I have a position" or "my client" which is suppose to be the employer.

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Do People Actually Get Jobs Through Recruiters?

Honestly, I'm starting to feel like Charlie Brown and Lucy with the football! A week ago I got an email from a recruiter who was from out of state recruiting for one of our big companies here. I told him that I don't work with recruiters who aren't in my home state, but apparently (according to him) they've placed jobseekers with this company. (The company is nationwide, but headquartered here.) So I send him my resume, and I had to sign off on what he was submitting. He only put my last two years, all bundled as contract work, and none of my earlier work. When I asked him why, he said his boss told him to do it that way because I had so many contract jobs that were short term with too much time inbetween.

It's been a week today, and I haven't heard anything from this recruiter, and this isn't the only one that has ghosted me. There was one who sent me on one interview (I didn't get the job), and I haven't heard back from him. I called to follow up once a week and also to see what his client said and..... Crickets. Based on an article I read in LinkedIn, this week I'm starting to respond to recruiter emails with the position I'm looking for, that I only work with in-state recruting firms that service my area in a certain radius, and that I won't tell you what my last salary was nor will I send you my W2's. So get this: I got THREE emails from a recruting firm for the same position from three different people with a position that wasn't a fit!

So I ask you, are recruiters just a sham, because that's what I'm beginning to think.

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Bonnie Akridge
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Hi Suzette. Work with them. When I started applying for jobs, I noticed that I was getting out of state calls and come to find out many of them were recruiters but I wasn't answering the phone because the calls were not local. It just makes me think how many opportunities I missed and could I have possibly been employed by now. I interviewed for a job today in Swedesboro, NJ but the call came from Florida. I interviewed for a job yesterday in the same town but that call came from Wisconsin. So work with them. Why in the world would you tell recruiters no when you are looking for a job?

3y
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Rizwan Sheikh
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Yes and no. Now req... hire for all states, how I don't know.

3y
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Amy J.Jones./ very frustrated

To begin. I am sorry if I seem irritated, .... but I am. I know that progress is necessary in the 21st century, but i wish recruiters did not use software to send employment opportunities. Buzz words and phrases match the qualifications from a resume to job/career opportunities. Rarely does a recruiter READ the resume until later. I know it is they only way to "service" job listing clients with reasonable candidates..... BUT.... I clearly do not want to sell/market insurance regardless of the variety, nor do I want to drive a truck. My resume indicates many years of sales as well as previously owning my own business. The buzz words are: sales, sole proprietorship. co-owner, etc.... what is in my inbox daily? Wanted: CDL drivers, insurance agents wanted, telemarket positions....... I am not licensed for insurance sales, nor do I have a CDL..... And, I do not desire to get them; I have a MBA, and I have GSL debt for God's sake..... Why do recruiters think I have extra cash laying around for pre-licensing instruction as well as the licenses themselves????

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Unable to find a job within my Career Path! Help-Advice!

As a middle aged single mother of two girls, I am unable to get a job within my career path. I started off as an administrative assistant and worked my way to an executive assistant but am unable to move into Human Resources. I was told that I needed a Bachelors degree in order to be considered for any Human Resource position, so I went back to college, started taking online night classes and am on my third year towards a degree in Human Resources Manangement. Most of my administive positions involved tasks within Human Resources, which built my skills and experience.

I have applied to several positions and only get to the third phase of the interview process. All of the positions I've applied for are stepping stone positions which are entry level positions. These positions involve the typical filing, new hire documents and orientation, scheduling and event planning. I am very well experienced with these tasks and many more within Human Resources and yet I am not considered for any positions!

The Bay Area is one of the toughest and most competitive job markets! The minute they see me in person I am not considered because I am not the hip young type all these companies seem to be looking for. They use large elaborate vocabulary in the interviewing process and expect the same out of me. I am not used to speaking so eloquently and this may be my downfall. Or my downfall is my interviewing skills, I'm always nervous and stumble on my words.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, I don't know what else to do. I don't want to give up or feel so horrible, I am honestly feeling like I have failed myself and that isn't who I am. I am a very positive person who is always encouraging and motivating others. But, today I feel defeated.

#NeedAdvice #Hr #careerchange #HumanResources #Recruiters #CareerCoach

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William Tamashiro
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If I were you I would start looking outside of that job market for the same job that you want if that's the career you want you may need to go where the jobs are unfortunately sometimes out so you must do I didn't didn't regret one moment of it

3y
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Dennis Lindroos
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Don't make any sense either. Let them know this can be yours too after you accepted the job. Your the creative type also.

3y
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Recruters

I red this today and I would like to share with you guys:

"I have something that I want to get off my chest about RECRUITERS...."

"You are some of the hardest working folks I’ve ever met. I have worked with many of you over the last few months and I have learned one thing. You have a tremendously difficult job that goes a mile a minute. You are probably chasing down a dozen reqs at once, juggling 20 or more phone calls a day, scheduling interviews, and getting feedback to/from everybody"

"The amount of organization it takes to do all of this is incredible and I know the job rarely ends when you leave work for the day. I for one appreciate everything you put into matching people to a job where they will feel fulfilled and really make a difference"

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Barbara sheppard
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You are some good hard working people and I commend you for your efforts in trying to find us jobs. in sincerely thank you for all of your efforts. Thank you!! Barbara

3y
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Potential Employers & Recruiters Requesting Personal Information Way Too Soon

When searching for jobs, during the application phase, even before being contacted for an interview, I have had potential employers and recruiters request personal information such as my full Social Security number, my full birth date, my home address and other personal information. Over the past several years this is happening a lot more frequently with recruiters and human resource departments requesting this information and often times, a web page for applying for a job requesting this information. I politely decline because I refuse to give out this information when the employer has no right to this information until you are actually hired. I get mixed reactions from the employers and recruiters, from surprise to telling me that they cannot move forward with my application without the information. Is this happening to anyone else? How do you handle this situation?

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Sheila Glidden
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Definitely don't give them your social! They don't need that until you're actually hired. But isn't the rest of that part of a normal application? I feel like I'm used to seeing those on there.

4y
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Robin Lampert
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Sadly there are people out there who prey on the vulnerable. Watch out for scams. Other people have a poorly developed sense of privacy or respect for their potential co-workers. Keep the way they act in mind when deciding whether you want the job. Some of the questions they ask may even be illegal, such as marital status. In the U.S., I don't think they are allowed to ask your age, so your full birthdate may be an illegal question in some places. (I'm not a lawyer, so I may be wrong about that.) They could ask if you are old enough to legally hold certain jobs (Some potentially dangerous jobs have a legal, minimum age.), but not your age. (Of course they can often guess based on other dates in your education and employment history.) And then there are people who have good reasons for their requests, but misguided in the timing or exactly what they request. For instance, they may ask for your home address in order to mail you an offer letter or to judge how quickly you could come into the office in an emergency (never mind that you aren't always at home when not at work).
For whatever reason, yes, it's happening to others and so often that you'll see articles about it on job search sites. (I like some of the articles from Human Workplace - https://www.linkedin.com/company/2787403 )
When you're talking or emailing, there are some ways around answering questions you consider overly personal. For instance, if they ask for your salary history, tell them the salary you expect based on the type of job for which you are applying. The on-line forms are trickier since they sometimes require certain entries before you can submit them. When deciding how to handle the situation, consider how much you trust the company or recruiter. Perhaps ask why they need to know that or even say that you'll give them that information later in the process, but you'd prefer to discuss the position ad your qualifications first. It's a difficult situation. Good luck!

4y
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Re: Advice Provided Job Seekers

I've received and read advice from several recruiters, professional job counselors and HR Consultants.

While I appreciate their sincere advice AND recognize their advice is based on the current hiring practices. These practices are baffling and appear most inefficient. I'll make several points to which I'd invite constructive criticism, illumination or plain correction.

Keyword: I've learned most organizations use the Applicant Tracking System (ATS) to screen applications for position to be filled. I'm told review the job description and ensure you have keywords in your resume. Is there a clue to what the key words should be? Does not the hiring agency build this blueprint outlining what ATS should look for?

Copy, Cut & Paste: I've been told to ensure your resume gets selected, be sure you have phrases from the job description in your resume. I view this as an integrity issue. I do not want to mislead a hiring manager with extracted phrases from the job description that I've not performed, but am capable of performing. I opine, this process is most inept!

Also, if I am switching to a new field, why would my resume have phrases from the job description? Should not my previous accomplishments highlight my abilities and the competencies that will benefit the organization? Seems like company recruiters seek cookie cutter new employees or people who may have worked in a specific position related to the position they seek to fill. Also appears most organizations are lean and do not have an effective internal training program. Are my expectations antiquated?

Branding: Develop your brand. What is your brand? Seems like "brand" is more important today than critical thinking skills. Seems like emphasis is more on the latest keyword than ability to deliver results.

Networking: Find someone at the company you can connect with via alumni or some other connection and ask them to sponsor you with HR. Has this worked for anyone? This is like cold contacting & cold contacting today is not like years past.

Does recruitment for our current workforce not value competencies like: Action Oriented; Demonstrated Business Acumen; Superb Decision Quality; Experience directing others; Capable of Managing Diversity; Expert Problem Solver; Astute Planner; Strategically Agile; Intellectual Horsepower; Innovation; Six Sigma; Potential; Excellent Process Manager; Cross Functional Team Contributor; Effective Leader; Thought Leader...you get the point. Seems like these are not focus items for the ATS.

Stands to reason without highlighting these type skills for hiring, a successful succession plan is not a priority and recruitment and retention of competing talent becomes increasingly more difficult for a company's long range human capital planning.

Another point: Federal Government loves to highlight jobs created per quarter. I believe they are reporting the wrong metric - they should be reporting how many people got hired into those created jobs. And where are these jobs? Who are the companies?

It is disheartening to continuously read and hear metrics being reported that
do not affect real change to improve the quality of life for Americans.

I make this post knowing there are varying opinions shaped by different experiences. My objective is to listen, learn and hear if others believe similarly.

Look forward to your comments/opinions.

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Tori Glen Cunningham
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True, to be honest the ATS system was simple created to filter candidates and get the strongest out of the bunch. The downfall is a candidate can have a strong resume based off of keywords not in person not the best candidate for the job.

3y
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Brian D Thikim
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Hi Robert, I'm going to try and answer every question in your post as much as I can. Yes, depending on what organization that you're going into, they have the ATS into what their looking for in a candidate, now these days, there is a growing trend that the ATS is really falling to the curb because it either filters too much, or to little. There's not a defining clue to specific key words are now these days it's more of what you've done and what you're passionate about. The hiring firm doesn't really put the ATS into account since they are working directly with the hiring manager so that's how they are getting their applicants now these days.
For the Cut, Copy and Paste: That is a very big no no.. cutting and pasting the job description is not a good tell sign on how your resume should look like. What most companies are truly looking for are results.. For example, "we had an issue that we were overspending about $250,000 on general labor and materials. After an analysis, we found out that the rates in the database didn't reflect to what our current numbers were generating. After continuous adjustments, we reduced the overspending costs down to $50,000." This is just an example but most recruiters are going to look for things that determine results. If you're going into a new field, you have to reflect your resume to the field. For example, if you're in Engineering and you want to go into sales, you have to provide examples that would constitute what you've done to get the parts for a reduced price. Or if it was visa versa, you have to generate your resume to provide results into the engineering field. Not a "sales" resume for an engineering position. The biggest issue that I've seen is that they try to find people just to serve as a quota rather than an actual person. This got me really annoyed when I was trying to find a job. They would say that they liked my resume and even though they said they would get in touch with the HR manager, they never did so I was sort of left out in the dust. For branding: It's what you're overall emphasis is. For example, I'm a manufacturing engineer, but if you look at my resume, you can see that I've done internships and jobs that were more of a continuous improvement engineer on top to what I am as an manufacturing engineer. The "true" companies will not look for keywords, but things that have proven your results in them. Like the previous example that I said. They're looking for results rather than keywords. Networking: No.. .Just no... if you already know the HR person, than it's alright to contact them and talk with them, but not cold contact them... it's awkward, and sometimes rude to think of. I never done it, because I would rather have the HR person get to connect me first and then go forward with an interview. Let them search for you and not the other way around. Depending on the recruiting firm and the actual person that you're talking to, they value all the competencies that you just said. The ones that don't really value them are firms that look more for satisifying quotas rather than working with people. That's why it's difficult to choose recruiting firms so I tend to choose ones that actually get to know me and my goals so they can see if I can be a good fit. I think overall, out of all the experiences that I've had, it all boils down to what are you passionate about? How does your resume reflect what you are in the workforce. Numbers are numbers if you don't have experience with it. You have to be passionate to what your "brand" is. Are you an engineer that loves to do continuous improvement? or want to go ahead in Six sigma?.. Or are you in sales that has a drive for getting things at the right time so the prices are going to be lower. I've actually talked with multiple recruiters about the ATS and practically all of them say that they started to "let go" of the tracker because the recruiters that they hire provide more info than the ATS has ever done. The one thing the algorithm can't show is drive and passion of the person. I hope this helps, and I hope I answered most of the questions for you.

3y
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Looking for a recruiter

Does anyone have any leads on recruiters? Looking for a recruiter who specializes in relocation, I am looking to relocate to Northern California.

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Mariah Bliss
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Hi Jennifer: Thanks for posting to Jobcase! I think your best bet would be to focus on recruiters who work in your industry, and then who work in the area that you'd like to live in. What kind of job role are you looking for?

4y
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