#ghosting

Share Topic
Report Content
Interested in this topic? Be the first to follow.
Report

What is up with the ghosting?

I had a lady contact me thru Indeed. She messaged me and asked if I would like to interview. We had a phone interview and I went two days later and had another interview . She showed me around and even introduced me to some of the office people. She was supposed to contact two days later and let me know if I got the job. She didn't contact me and I have emailed her twice and she will not even respond. Very strange. I wouldn't take the job now if she did offer it to me because I dont wont to work for someone that rude and inconsiderate. What ever happened to professionalism and common courtesy?? That just annoys me.

144
187
Share
Show Previous Comments
Tiffany Greenlee
Report

Of course there's no reason to be inconsiderate...but maybe there were unseen circumstances happening in the workplace that aren't a reflection on you at ALL. Count ur blessings, if it was that way for the hiring process, imagine what working there would be like.

39w
Like
Reply
David Church
Report

Unfortunately very typical nowadays.

One other possibility that always arises in job searches is that companies will sometimes use job postings for internal "research"

Find out how many people would apply,what their skills are, what kind of money they would want, etc.

The posted job may not even exist, or it may be an "exploratory" effort.

39w
Like
Reply
Report

Ghosting

I firmly believe that every one of these employment agencies are not out for a job seekers best interest, let alone landing a job for someone. I have relentlessly sent resume after resume , even multiple times to same job offer, for nearly 3 months now. I have had 3 interviews , with two of them leaving me feel as if I were just a "number" for the books. I am calling it quits on these so called employment agencies. That's the only solution I can come up with.

2
2
Share
Matt Bornhorst
Report

I had that happen to me too James Caudill - the idea of companies ghosting candidates is awful, and speaks volumes about the quality of internal communication at that company.

Have you tried using the job search tool here on Jobcase? It’s simple and you can search anytime for jobs located right near your home. Just follow these steps:

1. Click on Jobs & Companies at the top of the page, or head over [here] (http://www.jobcase.com/jobs/search)

2. Enter a job into the search field where it says Job Title, Keywords, or Company.

3. Add in your location by filling in your City and State OR zip code. Then click the magnifying glass to search.

4. Once the list is up, click on “View Job" of any you are interested in and then apply to any you feel are a great fit.

Wishing you the best of luck with your job search!

47w
1
1
1 Like
Report

Ghosting is the cruel and mean reality of job hunting.

As the job seeker, we are on our best behavior, but recruiters and hiring managers are not. I tell myself that I wouldn’t want to work with that company anyway if they treat people like that, the way they are trying to recruit. How many times have they asked for your Resume then they are gone, or when you have a phone interview then you never hear back from anyone. Job hunting is a roller coaster your going to have good days and bad days but ultimately a great job is going to come your way!

43
39
Share
Show Previous Comments
Jan Mukomela
Report

Job hunting is a full time job, its hard work reading job posts to make sure you qualify, its our time and we put in for companies unprofessionalism to treat canidates like that is horrible.

33w
2
Reply
2 Likes
Jan Mukomela
Report

Amy Newby, i get what your saying with job load. HR should have a form letter to send out, 2 seconds of time. We all have a large workload. We need to bring the old way. Go to place of business fill out application and when we interview we are told right then yes or no. I believe alot of these places that put out help wanted ads actually don't look at resumes,

33w
1
Reply
1 Like
Report

Discouraged

I can relate to how you feel, at least you know you have a Real interview. I keep getting E-mails, asking Me to confirm the interview but when I click on the button, there is never any information telling Me when and where to appear, Not even a Phone interview. I don't understand these Agencies, you answer them but never get a Real interview!

13
4
Share
Show Previous Comments
David Harvey
Report

One thing to always look for is whether they know who you are, or just your e-mail or phone number. You should expect that any message for an interview will have your name in it, except perhaps if you have already had an exchange with a human. Otherwise this is like the robo calls where there is a problem with your credit card or the IRS is after you, except that they haven't mentioned your name...

21w
1
Reply
1 Like
Marijoy Bertolini
Report

@AndreFisher, you're right that it's frustrating. There are good agencies out there and usually you can visit the office & talk to someone face to face. Much better experience! Try to get in front of someone if you can.

21w
3
Reply
3 Likes
Report

Job ghosting

I’ve been reading about job ghosting. I’ve not experienced this myself. Has anyone had experience with this phenomenon?

28
65
Share
Show Previous Comments
Andrew Pouliot
Report

The only time when i got introduced to it was when I had ideas for movie scripts & the ghost writers in waiting tried to steer me in the direction of letting someone else write them for me. Schemes such as these usually seem to come from the insecure when they become too comfortable & have reached the point where they believe that they've earned the privilege to twist their way into the lives of those on the lower end of the totem pole. If this has been exposed to you, that's good news. I'd love to talk more to the guy who had been followed for a year and a half. Be careful. The silent but deadliest are the ones whom you need to look out for.

47w
3
Reply
3 Likes
Cory Hotard
Report

Can you tell me a little more about what you saw maam

44w
1
Reply
1 Like
Report

Ready to show myself approved!!!

Got an email to set up an interview. Called and left several messages for a call back to set up a time and date. Never got a call back. Finally reached email sender and now l have a interview. Hope all goes well. Keeping my faith in GOD. Ready to prove my skills.

5
4
Share
Show Previous Comments
Dannielle Driscoll
Report

You got this Doris!

44w
1
Reply
1 Like
Richard Robinson
Report

Go get that prize!!

40w
1
Reply
1 Like
Report

Excuse me

Tina, what is ghosting?!?

2
2
Share
Matt Bornhorst
Report

Hi Belinda Nakamoto - I'm not Tina, but I can explain ghosting! It's when someone does not respond back at all to any messages, and becomes a 'ghost' by being unreachable. It is almost always done purposefully, and is really poor professional communication. Both employees and companies are unfortunately perpetrators of this behavior.

I hope this helps!

41w
2
1
2 Likes
Report

This is the definition of "Employer ghosting."

There are a lot of people posting "employer ghosting" on Jobcase, but no one has defined what it means. I did some research and found this: This is the definition of "employer ghosting:

You’re communicating with recruiters or hiring managers about a promising new job, and they suddenly stop returning your messages. You’ve been ghosted. Q: What if a potential employer stops responding to me? A: It’s happened to all of us: You’re communicating with recruiters or hiring managers about a promising new job, and they suddenly stop returning your messages. You follow up after a first, second, maybe even a third interview, and never hear back. You wonder what you could have done differently and if there’s any hope of reviving their interest. You’ve been ghosted. In case you’re not familiar with this term, which has recently joined the vernacular, ghosting has its origins in the social arena: Someone you’re dating suddenly stops texting. A friend stops returning your calls. As a career coach, I see workplace ghosting happening more and more. As if the burden of doing a job search were not enormous enough, add this new insult to an already fragile ego. But you’re not alone. Why You’ve Been Ghosted First, the why. The short answer is, it probably has nothing to do with you. • The bar for candidate selection is higher than ever. There are many more qualified candidates for far fewer positions. On top of that, people are working harder and may not have the bandwidth to respond in a meaningful way, no matter how qualified you are. Along with this comes the fact, I believe, that social media and online dating apps have made such behavior a more acceptable norm; we’ve been socialized to tolerate this disappearing act. • There’s an imbalance of power. Companies have something of value that you and many others want. They don’t need to worry about fallout to their company’s reputation. I wonder if it’s perhaps the opposite—the higher-ups believe that being able to ignore candidates gives them more cachet. • There was never a job available to begin with. Sometimes companies will post a position simply to comply with fair-hiring practices. • There is a slim, though unlikely, possibility that your correspondence never made it through firewalls and is now circulating somewhere in cyberspace. I see workplace ghosting happening more and more. … Add this new insult to an already fragile ego. But you’re not alone. So What Can You Do About It? • I’m a believer that applying a bit of old-school guilt sometimes goes a long way toward nudging a wayward contact. I might send a brief email, then follow up with an almost-verbatim voicemail message: “You may recall I was referred by our mutual friend, Kate Smith. Just wanted to check in. Sent two emails over the past two weeks and didn’t hear back. Wanted to make sure everything is OK.” • Decide how many times to follow up, and stick to it. Typically, this number should be based on insights gleaned by consulting with your LinkedIn contacts who work for the company or know someone who does. However, prepare yourself for people who, when you finally reach them, criticize you. Be apologetic: “I know I’ve called a number of times and apologize for appearing to be a pest. I’m just excited by the work you’re doing and figured you’re busy.” • Find a new and better point person. Sometimes people don’t respond because they aren’t the right contacts. Or maybe the person you’ve been speaking with had to depart the company suddenly. • Generate activity—then make sure the company knows about it. Busy people are more interesting to companies. You might write an email that says: “I’m moving forward with interviews at two competing firms. I would hate to be faced with a decision without having the opportunity to talk to you.” • Invest the time in making sure that you present yourself as someone worth getting to know. Write a great email, and make sure to proof it carefully. Prepare your voicemail message in advance. • Give up … but don’t forget. Focus on other options. But be ready when, almost out of the blue, you receive a response. It may even be an apology. Above all else: never personalize the process. You’ve been ignored, not necessarily rejected. I, too, have been a frequent victim of career-related ghosting. But the reason I get ghosted often is that I make myself get out there. Remember, you’ve only been ghosted because you put yourself out there. And that’s a good thing!

9
4
Share
Show Previous Comments
Tracy Rowland
Report

Also ageism plays into this. If you are over 45-50 and lose your job and especially have many years of upward mobility with one company. You are forced to change your resume to not reflect you college grad year and years you were employed at a certain company. You will most likely get multiple interviews then they ask you to fill out the job app and that is when the ghosting begins. They realize you are not the age they want. You are too old. What they don’t realize is you will work twice as hard as the three millennials they hire to do the one job and who will quit when they are bored. Wait until you have had over a year of multiple companies in multiple positions and multiple interviews start ghosting after they say you will be a great fit just get online and fill out the actual app and they then see your age and it all ends. You finally rarely get an email saying either we decided to take an internal candidate or we had several other more qualified applicants. Funny how you were basically hired until they saw your age. It exists and is causing people to lose everything. No one will even hire you for a stocking job because you should be in a higher position and we will get you to the right people who then ghost you. It has become a big practice especially in big box retail and people need to be aware that ghosting and ageism go hand in hand in many cases. Sad but true.

44w
3
Reply
3 Likes
Andrew Pouliot
Report

I wouldn't go to the extreme of making myself sound indispensable. Companies read hundreds of resumes weekly, & your strengths will have already been highlighted in your cover letter. Also, take time to send a thank you note if the hiring manager took the time to meet with you. It won't go forgotten. Power isnt diversified in this day & age. If anything, it's more centralized than it's been in a long time. Companies are buying portfolios back, & for every stack of resumes that employers review, there are millions of applicants who have become discouraged & stopped looking for work. This has led to a decline in investment which is hampering the Treasury Depts. ability to manage the nation's funds in a most effective manner. These folks who have stopped looking for work aren't recorded in the low unemployment figures that we read on a monthly basis. Summing it up, the crisis did us in.

44w
1
Reply
1 Like
Report

Candidates are Ghosting New Employers – Here’s How You Can Avoid This at Your Company | LinkedIn

This is a switch-Employers are getting "ghosted" and it is on the rise!

Imagine you’ve just spent months recruiting the perfect candidate. Their first day finally arrives … but they don’t. You’ve been ghosted.

And while it may sound like something that’s only relevant for dating or friendships, ghosting has crept into the employer/employee relationship as well. Companies across the United States are noticing promising candidates vanishing and employees walking out and never coming back. And this phenomenon is on the rise. The Washington Post reports a 10% to 20% increase in candidate and employee ghosting over the past year. “Applicants blow off interviews,” the Post reports. “New hires turn into no-shows. Workers leave one evening and never return.”

The practice is popping up in other places, too, including Canada and the United Kingdom.

In the current talent market, candidates can afford to be picky about the opportunities they pursue, which means more work for you to make sure they show up on day one and stick around.

But you needn’t be spooked by ghosts. To keep candidates engaged and interested at every stage of the hiring process, here are a few simple steps you can take:

  1. The application process: keep candidates informed about where they stand to improve their experience For candidates actively looking for a new job, there’s no shortage of opportunities out there right now. In fact, there are more open jobs than there are people to fill them. So if candidates apply to your company and don’t hear anything for weeks or months, chances are they’ll simply give up and look elsewhere.

Keeping candidates in the loop can be time-consuming, especially when you’ve got a lot of people to get back to. But the candidate experience you provide at this early stage of the process can fundamentally impact how candidates view your company when it comes time to make a big decision — like whether to take the job or tell you that they’ve taken another.

Luckily, you don’t have to write every response manually if you have an ATS. Sending automatic responses through your ATS is a simple fix to the application black hole. Even a short message lets candidates know their application has been received and you’re on the case. If possible, give them a rough time frame for the review process, inform them about next steps, and notify them if their application wasn’t successful. Even bad news is better than no news at all.

If you want to go the extra mile, offer candidates a way to track their application status themselves. Johnson & Johnson does this with Shine, its custom “candidate experience platform.” Similar to Domino’s pizza delivery tracker, Shine lets candidates see what’s happening with their application in real time — increasing transparency while taking some of the burden off the recruiter’s shoulders.

  1. The initial outreach: if a candidate goes quiet, send a friendly, nonsalesy follow-up If you’ve been courting a candidate through LinkedIn or email, you may be disappointed if, out of the blue, they stop replying. But don’t let their silence discourage you. The best candidates are fielding a lot of messages from recruiters, so it’s possible they’re swamped and they’ve just forgotten to respond.

Give them a reason to remember you. Sending a quick follow-up message never hurts, especially if it sounds friendly and organic. This isn’t the time for a pushy sales pitch.

Rather than just reminding candidates that you haven’t heard from them in a while, try sharing a piece of content that they’ll find relevant or amusing, like an interesting news story about their industry or a fun Buzzfeed post about their unusual hobby. If they respond, great. If they’re still silent, at least you’ve tried.

If they stop responding after you’ve already arranged to talk, you can also try a tactic used by Brendan Browne, LinkedIn’s VP of global talent acquisition. Brendan recommends saying “I’m concerned” to regain a candidate’s attention and set the stage for an honest and open conversation. Often, candidates will reveal the reason they stopped responding (like a change of heart about leaving their current job), letting you know how to approach the discussion differently moving forward.

  1. The interview stage: shift the conversation from the company to the candidate’s goals The interview is your best opportunity to find out if the candidate is a good fit for the role. But it’s also a chance for the candidate to decide if the role and company are a good fit for them. If they don’t have a feeling for that by the time you show them out, they may be less open to considering an offer.

Take the time in every interview to shift the conversation away from what you need and toward what the candidate is looking for in a job. Learning about their goals and aspirations can help you tailor the discussion accordingly — answering the question of why this opportunity is the one that will help them grow their career.

By making your interviews less about the company’s goals and more about the candidate’s personal and professional development, you’re showing that you’re invested in their future. In turn, they’ll be more invested in your company, reducing the likelihood that they’ll leave the interview and never be heard from again.

  1. The offer phase: establish a clear timeline to let candidates know when they’ll hear back from you When the final interview is over, you’re faced with the task of choosing the best fit. After all that effort, this would be the worst time for your top candidate to ghost you.

The best way to avoid it is simple. Don’t ghost them first.

Establishing a clear timeline is vital at this stage. If you plan to have a final answer for your candidates within five days, tell them that immediately after the interview and then stay true to your word. If they’re invested in the role and know when they’ll hear back from you, they’re less likely to accept another offer first.

If you don’t have a clear timeline to share, try the tactic used by Stacy Zapar, founder of the San Diego–based Talent Agency: tell candidates they’ll never go into the weekend without hearing from you. Stacy gives candidates an update every Friday afternoon — even if that update is that there’s no major update.

Candidates will appreciate knowing that you haven’t forgotten about them. If you just go silent, on the other hand, you can’t be surprised when candidates respond in kind when you finally reach out with an offer.

  1. The first day and beyond: ensure your employer brand delivers on its promise People sometimes ghost on jobs because it’s easier than having an awkward conversation about a change of heart. And often those second thoughts arise because the job or company didn’t live up to the expectations of the new hire.

You want to sell candidates on the job so they won’t take another offer first, or so they won’t accept your offer then take another without informing you. But you don’t want to oversell the position and make candidates feel like you pulled the wool over their eyes.

Be honest about possible downsides of the job and tell candidates how your company is striving to improve. If your employer brand is transparent and accurate, your new hire will certainly be excited for their first day — and probably for most of the days that follow.

Ghosting goes both ways: keep candidates as informed as you want to be Communication is a two-way street. While you’d never intentionally ghost a candidate, it is easy to do inadvertently when you’re busy. And when candidates are juggling a lot of balls in the middle of a job hunt, they can make the same mistake. Don’t get mad — get talkative.

The more you communicate with candidates, the more they’ll communicate with you. If you keep candidates engaged by establishing a consistent pattern of communication, they’ll keep you in the loop about any changing circumstances and the specter of possible ghosting will nearly vanish.

1
2
Share
Ashley Wilson
Report

Thank you Delores Jackson ! : )

45w
2
1
2 Likes
Report

Starting to get very very depressed

Hey im really starting to feel the depression now i even applied at a movie theater and she said she would call me between 8:30-9:30 if i got the job no call which means no job im really starting to feel like theres no hope for me :(

2
4
Share
Show Previous Comments
Yolanda Blount
Report

I hear your desperation. If needed seek a counselor at a nonprofit counseling center where they can use a sliding scale for payment. Also, if you attend a church maybe you can speak to your pastor.

41w
Like
Reply
Simone Reynolds
Report

Are there any companies in your area that have training programs you might be interested in? It may be a way to get in to something your interested in with a bit less competition given there will be more than one slot. Good luck!

40w
1
Reply
1 Like