#interviewpreparation

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Finally a job interview in person after 4 months of looking!

Would appreciate any feedback on the interview process. I am looking at interview webinars and tips. I hope this is the job for now.

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Shilpa Sen
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All the best in your job search

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Ghufran Ullah
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I need job

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Mariah Bliss
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Hi Ellenor: It looks like they want to know what strengths and weaknesses you have, and how that might affect their organization. Like, if you tend to procrastinate (weakness), that could be a bad thing for the other people you work with. I suggest mentioning a weakness you've improved on over the past few years. That way, you're showing employers you're not afraid to work on yourself.

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What to say in a interview?

Hi Jobcase Community unfortunately inhave no job since last Friday. And if i do get future interviews what can i say about that one manager treated me unfairly or bullying we know we do not suppose to talk about manager or the previous job how to handle that question if i am asked about it.

Thank You

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Raymond Gledhill
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I usually just say that i was moving on to better opportunities but do like the movie stars do and when you talk about your old jobs talk about the things you loved and then when they ask about the things you didnt like.... Tell them about some peoblems that you fixed. Ive had soooooo many interviews as exec. Chef its not funny and im also one to say the wrong thing so this is something ive figured out. Hope it helps

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Lorraine Belasco
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Hi Raquel, I found this article to assist with the same question online. I hope it helps; Have your talking points ready about an unfortunate situation. By Chrissy Scivicque, Contributor Aug. 15, 2013 U.S. News & World Report More

Chrissy Scivicque "So, why did your previous employer let you go?"

Ouch. Rough question to get in a job interview. But let's be real: If you encountered a termination in the past, it's one you will get asked – guaranteed.

For a question like this, it's especially important to prepare and practice. Stumbling over your words can sound like you're hiding something or as if you're not exactly sure what happened – neither of which will put you at the top of the list for prospective employers.

To help you feel calm, cool and confident when facing this question, keep the following tips in mind:

  1. Don't beat yourself up. Not every employer is a perfect match for every employee. Most people, including your interviewer, get that. Don't let this situation drag you down for the rest of your career. The more you practice how to respond to this question, the more the emotion will dissipate.

You don't want to go into the interview still feeling raw about what happened, so take time to process the events that took place and put things in perspective. Turn this into a powerful learning experience from which you can really grow. In all likelihood, that's exactly what it was for you. Now you just need to learn to articulate that.

  1. Be honest. The truth always comes out and it's better that they hear it from you than someone else. A reference check may very well reveal the full story anyway, so don't try to brush things under the rug or turn the situation into something it wasn't.

  2. Share what happened. Go through the "story" in a concise, straightforward way, sharing only the facts, not your feelings or perceptions.

  3. Emphasize what you learned. Take ownership for your role in the situation. Don't blame others or make excuses. Remember that there are two sides to every story and your interviewer knows that. If you start focusing on how you were the victim and everyone did you wrong, a big red flag will appear. It takes two to tango, my friend. No matter how "victimized" you might have been, you and your actions were indeed a part of it.

Position yourself as a mature, self-reflective person who gained a lot from this painful experience. Share details about what you learned and how you grew both as a person and a professional. Often, the most devastating life events can turn out to be blessings. They create turning points that we otherwise would have never reached on our own.

This part of the discussion is where the majority of your time should be spent when answering the question.

  1. Explain what will be different now. It's almost inevitable that as a result of this experience, you'll be a different employee. Talk about that. How will you prevent this kind of thing from happening again in the future? What specific changes have you made in your own professional behavior to help ensure this isn't a recurring theme in your career?

Answer this question thoughtfully and with humility and your interviewer may even be on your side by the end.

You want to appear balanced and clearheaded in this conversation, so planning and practice are essential. Don't try to wing it. That's when people get emotional and trouble ensues.

Ultimately, remember that transparency will make this line of questioning end sooner. If your interviewer senses that you're holding something back, he or she will continue to probe and dig deeper until they're satisfied. Or, even worse, they'll write you off completely. Why run the risk of hiring someone who creates any feeling of uneasiness or suspicion when there are so many other qualified candidates to choose from?

Finally, keep your head held high. You are a strong candidate, even with this glitch in your record. Focus on your achievements and the things of which you're most proud. Interviewers understand that you're human and believe it, they've heard worse.

Chrissy Scivicque, the founder of EatYourCareer.com, believes work can be a nourishing life experience. As a career coach, corporate trainer, and public speaker, she helps professionals of all levels unlock their true potential and discover long-lasting career fulfillment.

Chrissy Scivicque, Contributor

Chrissy Scivicque believes that work can be a delicious, nourishing life experience – and she l... READ MORE Tags: careers, Interviewing, unemployment

ABOUT ON CAREERS Our expert contributors give their best advice on answering common interview questions, perfecting job applications, negotiating salary and more.

Find savvy job advice from the brains behind top careers blogs and websites, including Robin Reshwan, Jobhuntercoach, Career Sherpa, Ray Bixler, Hallie Crawford, Robin Madell and Peter Gudmundsson.

Edited by Rebecca Koenig.

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"The Job Hunt Game"

To make the story short, I will be brief on the introduction: I was working as a Facility Coordinator, and I loved it. I got this Facility through a year long transition. The day I confirmed it was complete, my boss flew up to my location and relieved me of my assignment. I've recieved nothing but the highest of praises. I did accidentally break the email chain a few times, but who doesn't? Particularly when policy changes every week.. Any way, now I'm on the job hunt. I landed one already, but I had to turn it down after they offered me half of the listing salary. I now have an interview on Saturday for a good position in a drink manufacturing facility. Also, I received an offer through email for a high position at a Crypto Currency firm. I'm ecstatic and very hopeful that one, if not both of these opportunities are obtainable. I'm excellent at interviews, and I always pull my weight. I've been going through this losing my job at "no fault of my own" maze for a decade now. I'm over it, and ready to get established. Please pray for me! Thanks everyone for reading my post.

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Nelson Franco
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Your Positive Attitude, Determination and Perseverance despite all your previous employment challenges is commendable Paul Roe . I'm sure this is the same way you approach and manage challenging work issues and issues that arise within the workplace on a day to day basis.

Please make sure you emphasize all your problem solving skills during your interview on Saturday. We'll be rooting for you... You Got This!

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