5 Mistakes to avoid after being laid off

Last updated: May 29, 2024
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Ashley Wilson
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Content Manager at Jobcase
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5 Mistakes to avoid after being laid off
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If you’ve ever been laid off or you are facing that challenge now, you know that it feels like to have your world is crashing down around you. It’s easy to give in to sadness and anxiety, but, being laid off isn't forever and your career journey WILL continue!

To help you cope during this uncertain time, check out the top five mistakes to avoid after a layoff.

Taking it personally

Unfortunately, layoffs are a part of life and they are out of your control. Although it feels personal and you may be angry or upset try not to take it to heart because it’s nothing that you did wrong. Avoid talking or thinking negatively about yourself, especially if an acquaintance or family member asks what you’re doing career-wise or how your job is going. Instead, make sure you have an update about your recent layoff and the potential next steps you want to take. Here is an example:

"Due to the struggling economy, my company let go of a handful of employees, including myself. I am currently exploring opportunities that will allow me to take advantage of my skills as a (insert job title/skills) along with my (list an accomplishment that highlights those skills)!”

Jumping into the job search without a plan

Instead of diving right back into the world of job searching, use this time to rethink your desired career path! List out all of your past accomplishments and highlight the ones that matter the most to you. Pay attention to the tasks and responsibilities you enjoyed and those you did not. You may even find that you’ll be much happier in a slightly different role!

You will also have a much easier time navigating the unemployment world if you have a solid plan and goals. Decide which jobs are right for you and how you will get there!

Not reaching out to your network

Tapping into your connections (and your connection’s connections!) is an awesome way to accelerate your #jobsearch. Studies show that referred applicants are 15x more likely to be hired than someone who simply applies without a referral. So be sure to reach out to those you know professionally and don’t be afraid to share your story and ask for their help with the next steps.

Not leaving with everything you need

No, we are not suggesting that you steal all of the office supplies from the break room, but you should make sure that you have the contact information of coworkers and supervisors that could be beneficial in the future! You will also want to take any work samples that will be beneficial to your portfolio, your personal belongings as well as things from your locker or desk. Make sure to reach out to those at your job that you want to act as a reference moving forward. Connect with them before you head out and grab their contact info!

Complaining on social media

We all tend to be a bit drawn to drama as a society, but at the end of the day, no one wants to associate with that individual who complains all the time. If you bad mouth your past employer or the company it will most certainly come back to haunt you. Your Facebook or Instagram may be set to private, but once shared online it is there forever and it has a way of making its way out into the world. Just keep your posts light and positive. Ranting and raving might make you feel better, but avoid a public forum and save it for late-night calls with your closest friends.

How would you (or are you) handle being laid off?

#unemployment #coronavirus

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Avea Walters
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Little Ms Muffet sitting on your phone eating curds and pie. I have applied for unemployment benefits. Out of work since March, no response. Surprisingly I received text from both political parties. No money yet

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Karen Bennett
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My last day of work was March 22. I am a security guard and the company that I work is contracted out to a private company that requires security services.

4y
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Mahamed Sulub
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Healthcare nurse

Good advice

4y
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Mahamed Sulub
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Healthcare nurse

Good advice

4y
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Anthony Gleicher
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Apply be prepared to appeal co may put down misconduct get what you deserve. The companies put money into a fund any left over goes into statesBudget

4y
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Karen Eplite
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Office Mgr at Self Advocacy Assn Of Nys

Good advice but so hard not to take it personally. I’ve been sick, worried and depressed over this. Although I am blessed to receive unemployment I was the only one laid off. All others could work some hours remotely. I got laid off, was told no guarantee of a job upon reopening. I’m a single person, woman over 50. Find a job??!! Is it possible? I’ll lose everything I worked two jobs for for years. I have great skills but...... I’m angry I want to know why. Never had a disciplinary action, never a warning. I am a good employee. There every day. Don’t abuse time.

I feel I was discarded.

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David LAROCHE
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Day by day

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Javier Amato
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Where is the goberment help only 600 in 10 week I cannot get in to my account you call no one can help you some one know when they going to open the offices

4y
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Rafael Rozas
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IT Manager/Analyst

I did leave out one thing and that was not creating a plan of attack for a new job. Everything else was under control. Networking was completed and yes I blame myself and still do but the reasons why I blame myself are personal ones. I also forgave my so called manager and so call colleagues.

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Donna Dugas
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I think this advice is just too easy-breezy. It's all well and good if you're on a "career path" and have a "network". However, a great many people who've been laid-off, downsized, terminated for age and/or disability may no longer have a path. The jobs they may have held for many years are gone (probably for good), their skill set may be inadequate for the changes that have occurred in the employment sector, and their resumes lacking. Those who have aged out or developed chronic illness or disability are being told to return to square one or accept the inevitable sub-minimum wage jobs performing grunt work and taking orders from teenagers.

And speaking of young people also laid off from (what was perhaps) their first job...I see so many postings from them, unwilling to expend any effort at all in the job hunt process. Most seem to think if they just post "I need a job" that employers will track them down without benefit of even applying.

But I digress...I'm just painfully tired of articles such as this that fail to address the truly catastrophic life-ending situation we now find ourselves in. These recommendations are far too simplistic and not in touch with the real situation at hand.

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