Lara Grant
Contributor
Contributor
Start making more money doing same job
Last updated: July 3, 2022
Lara Grant
Contributor
Contributor
Follow
Like
Comment
Share
Start making more money doing same job
Jump to section

That’s right – you could be making more money doing the same job. While getting a promotion or earning a specific certification/degree are a couple options to get paid a higher wage, it is possible for you to make more money today.

Keep reading for three ways you can take home a bigger paycheck doing the same job, and see which works best for you.

Consider working the second or third shift

You can get a significant pay increase by switching from the first shift (typically between the hours of 8a.m. and 5p.m.) to either the second shift (5p.m. and 1a.m.) or third shift (12a.m. to 8a.m.) Because these are less convenient working hours for most people, companies are willing to pay more.

While there’s no law that requires companies to pay more, the average for shift differentials is 10 percent more than the baseline wage.

So if the hourly rate is $20/hour, the second shift would typically pay $22/hour, resulting in about $80 more for a five-day work week. The third shift (also known as the graveyard or night shift) could potentially be paid a higher percentage since it’s the least desirable.

While there are compromises to work these shifts – adjustments to a natural sleep cycle and scheduling social or routine appointments – if you’re naturally more wired at night or have a long commute that could be greatly reduced by the lack of nighttime traffic, the third shift may be appealing.

Not every company has second and third shifts available, but the industries with higher percentages include manufacturing and production, customer service and support, and transportation and distribution. Other examples include bartenders, casino dealers, and security guards.

Hear directly from the Jobcase community:

Is working the night shift more difficult than the day shift?
- Richard Jones, Jobcase member

Ask for a raise

Ask for a raise - it’s as simple as that! Your boss and company are rarely going to give you a raise unprompted, so take the initiative and ask for one yourself.

Of course there are factors to consider, like how long you’ve been in your role, how long it’s been since your last pay increase, and your work performance, but if you believe you’re deserving of a raise, it doesn’t hurt to ask.

Here are some tips for asking for a raise:

  • Do your research – Before you walk into any salary negotiation, know the average pay for your position with your level of experience. Glassdoor and PayScale are good websites for doing this.

  • Ask for a number at the top of the range – Once you know the average salary range, plan to ask for the number at the top of that. Not only because you’re valued at that, but also since your boss may negotiate down.

  • Practice what you’re going to say – Rehearse all your talking points and what you would say to any questions your boss may ask. Practice in the mirror or with a friend multiple times. Not only will this help you be prepared, but it’ll likely make you feel more confident and composed.

For more tips, read expert advice on the art of salary negotiations here.  

Switch companies

If you’re not going to get a raise or there’s no upward mobility at your current company, don't be afraid to switch. A lateral job move (meaning you take a similar job at a new company or similar career level position at the same company) can be used in various industries and at any point in your career.

If your company pays on the low end for your position, it’s well worth it to apply and interview for a company that pays on the higher end. Or, if someone in your position can make more within a different department at your same company, you can also use a lateral move to your advantage.

Both of these options will require research into the hourly rates at your company and its competitors.

Remember that any new job is also an opportunity to negotiate salary. If a company is looking to fill a role with someone at your level of experience, then you're fulfilling a need, so don’t be afraid to ask for more money.

Potential employees may think doing so will get the offer rescinded or make them look greedy, but countless companies and hiring managers expect job candidates to make a counteroffer.

Learn from other Jobcasers:

When does it makes sense to make a lateral move?
- Stephanie K, Jobcase member


Have you used any of these options to increase your pay? Let us know!

11
Like
Comment
Share
Lara Grant
Contributor
Contributor
Follow

Comments

There are no comments yet. Be the first to comment.
Add
Related Articles
Michael Frash
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
Follow
4
Like
Comment
Share
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
Follow
7
Like
Comment
Share
Sara Jones
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
Follow
6
2 Comments
Like
Comment
Share
Ashley Wilson
Follow
8
Like
Comment
Share
Rochelly Fajardo
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
Follow
Like
Comment
Share
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
Follow
9
1 Comment
Like
Comment
Share
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
Follow
6
1 Comment
Like
Comment
Share
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
Follow
15
1 Comment
Like
Comment
Share