Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
How to stay healthy on your commute
Last updated: June 24, 2022
Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
Community Specialist
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How to stay healthy on your commute
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Whether you’re an essential worker who has kept our country going since the virus began or you’re heading back to work for the first time in a while, commuting to your job and staying safe amid the spread of the Coronavirus is a new challenge for just about everyone.

For those using public transportation or carpooling, the close proximity to others raises concerns about safety and the risk of infection - especially with the emerging Delta variant.

Here are some suggestions on safety measures you can take when you’re heading to work.

Staying safe on public transportation

Many cities and states have slowed or stopped their services over concerns that the virus could spread faster. Now that businesses are reopening and beginning to flourish, service schedules are slowly being restored with added social distancing measures and safety precautions.

Follow the new rules

Be sure to pay attention when taking public transportation as the rules may have changed. Look for and adhere to marked social distancing areas on train platforms, bus stations, and shelters. There also may be directional markers to organize and control foot traffic.

Take your own precautions

As the Delta variant is beginning to appear in cases around the country, experts recommend that people put masks back on while in public. Even if you have received the COVID vaccine, there may be a mask requirement for everyone taking public transportation regardless of vaccination status.

Because some individuals infected with COVID may be asymptomatic, wearing a mask or another form of face-covering while commuting is crucial to prevent accidentally spreading the virus to others.

Can’t wear a mask?
If you physically cannot wear a mask, as face coverings can be a hardship for people with respiratory issues, please consider a face shield. Consult your doctor to ensure that the face-covering you chose does not interfere with medical devices, like a cannula.

Make additional personal choices that keep you safe.

  • When possible, skip rows and seats between you and others
  • Carry and use hand sanitizer (the CDC recommends 60%+ alcohol)
  • Avoid touching handrails, seats, or other high-touch areas
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water before and after you commute

Carpooling and rideshares

The CDC suggests people drive to work by themselves, but sometimes this is simply not an option. If you carpool or rideshare, here are some suggestions.

  • Mask up. If you're in a car with someone who is not in your immediate family or household - wear a mask.

  • If you are not in the same household as others in your rideshare, it’s better to ride with the same people on a regular basis if possible.

  • Limit the number of passengers to a maximum of two people per vehicle.

  • Inside the vehicle, avoid close contact with the driver by sitting in the back seat.

  • If you’re driving your own vehicle, clean and disinfect surfaces such as door handles, armrests, steering wheel, seat belts, and car seats after every ride.

Additional precautions

When you get to work

Wash your hands immediately and throughout the day as frequently as possible, and try to avoid touching your face throughout the day.

  • When entering the workplace, wipe down your area with a disinfecting wipe or spray.

  • If you touch something that someone else has handled, sanitize or wash your hands following the interaction.

  • After washing your hands, it’s advised to use a paper towel or tissue to turn off the faucet. It’s also a good idea to skip the hand dryers; they can spread germs from people who didn’t wash their hands well enough.

When you return home

Minimizing exposure to your family or others you live with is one of the most important steps you can take to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

  • Whenever you can, it’s a good idea to shower immediately after arriving home.

  • Change out of the clothes you wore to work. Place your clothes in a separate dirty clothes bag to wash later or put your clothes directly into the washing machine.

  • Handle your shoes, work bag, work clothes, and other gear with care. Leave your work shoes outside your home, or place them in a bag.

  • Take the time to disinfect your phone, name tag or ID badge, eyewear, and any work supplies.
Related reads 

The new golden rule - and possibly the best piece of commuting advice? If you’re not feeling well, it is best to stay home. Stay safe and be well!

What do you think? Are you doing things differently with COVID-19? Share your experience in the comments below.

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Kai Dickerson
Community Specialist
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Luis Nunez

Ea

Ea

2y
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A Dog

I currently did about 30 hours. Next week maybe 35 38 not sure but I am not doing 40 full hours like before? And I am suppose to certify this Wednesday coming up?

I currently did about 30 hours. Next week maybe 35 38 not sure but I am not doing 40 full hours like before? And I am suppose to certify this Wednesday coming up?

2y
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A Dog

I recently got called back to work, I was on unemployment . Can I still get any unemployment benefits if I get paid the following week as long as I certify and let them know I just started to work again?

I recently got called back to work, I was on unemployment . Can I still get any unemployment benefits if I get paid the following week as long as I certify and let them know I just started to work again?

2y
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Ford Simpson

You covered a lot of information and as usual you did it well. Getting to and from work was easy as I live alone but for many it's going to be a challenge. I am now trying to make a schedule of what to clean and disinfect, it's a never ending quest but one you can get quite good at. Shared knowledge is good for everyone to be safe and healthy. Eat healthy foods that make you stronger in this predicament,your brain will function better also.Kai has become a great person to talk to and follow, Ford

You covered a lot of information and as usual you did it well. Getting to and from work was easy as I live alone but for many it's going to be a challenge. I am now trying to make a schedule of what to clean and disinfect, it's a never ending quest but one you can get quite good at. Shared knowledge is good for everyone to be safe and healthy. Eat healthy foods that make you stronger in this predicament,your brain will function better also.Kai has become a great person to talk to and follow, Ford

2y
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