Janice Reed
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8 steps to landing the perfect remote job
Last updated: August 19, 2022
Janice Reed
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8 steps to landing the perfect remote job
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Since the COVID-19 pandemic, remote work has risen considerably in popularity among both workers and employers.

Currently, 4.7 million Americans work at least half of the time remotely, with predictions estimating this number will be closer to 36 million by 2025.

There’s a lot to say of the benefits of remote jobs, too: shorter commute times, more flexible work hours, and a better work-life balance.

The question is, how do you actually land one of these coveted positions?

In this article, we’ll show you exactly how to get a remote job, guiding you through the eight steps required to make this dream a reality.

What is a remote job?

Remote jobs are any employment arrangement where you have the freedom and flexibility to work from wherever you like.

This is compared to a traditional job that requires employees to come into the office, factory, site, or branch every day.

Remote jobs have a variety of other names that people often use interchangeably:

  • Telecommuting (or telework)

  • Work from home (often abbreviated as WFH)

  • Mobile work or remote work

For employees, the main benefit of remote jobs is flexibility.

Commute times are cut down (often to zero if you’re working from home), and many remote jobs also give you the freedom to choose your work hours.

Plus, because remote employees aren’t required to work from a fixed location, you’ll have the choice of working wherever you like.

Most remote workers complete their jobs from home, but other popular locations include coworking spaces, cafes, and libraries.

(Image Source)

8 steps to landing the perfect remote job

Let’s walk through eight steps you can follow to land a remote job.

1. Get familiar with the language

Understanding the jargon can be the first barrier to diving in headfirst for those who haven't held a remote position before.

To get you up to speed, here are a few common remote working terms and what they mean:

  • Asynchronous communication: Communication that doesn’t take place in real-time (such as emails and instant messages)

  • Virtual assistant (VA): An assistant or administrator who works remotely, typically as an individual contractor

  • Brick-and-mortar business: A company with a physical location

  • Hybrid company: A company that has some in-office employees and some remote teams

  • Workation: When remote employees travel but are still working (a blend of the words work and vacation)

  • Digital workspace: Online platforms where remote workers collaborate, communicate, and store information

  • Happy hours: A get together after work where remote workers can have a few drinks, chat, and generally get to know each other outside of the work context

  • Blended team: Teams that have some in-office and some remote work employees

  • Remote OK: A company that is open to hiring remote workers (can also refer to employees who are equipped for remote work)

2. Determine what kind of remote job you want

It’s important to understand that remote work opportunities aren’t all exactly the same.

For example, these roles can either be fully remote (where you can work wherever you like, 100% of the time) or partially remote (often referred to as hybrid or blended roles).

These two styles have important implications.

For partially remote roles, you’ll usually need to go into the company office for some time each week, so you’ll need to live nearby.

For fully remote roles, you may be able to work out of state or even from another country altogether.

(Source)

That raises another important point: the possibility of working offshore.

Some remote companies are happy with employees working wherever, whenever. Others, while remote, ask you to work within agreed-upon hours (for example, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern Time).

This second kind of arrangement puts an obvious limitation on your location. In the above example, if you want to live on the West Coast, you’d need to start at 6 a.m. PT to meet those requirements.

Working from another country would be even more challenging.

So, before you start hunting for a work-from-home job, you need to decide what degree of flexibility you’re looking for.

3. Watch out for scams

Unfortunately, a percentage of remote job openings aren’t legitimate and are advertised by scammers.

Here are a few ways you can spot potential scams:

  • The employer has no online presence (no website)

  • The employer has a lot of negative reviews online (from remote work applicants)

  • They ask for personal information up front (like your credit card details or Social Security number)

  • The email address you’re corresponding with isn’t from the company domain

  • The job ad has a lot of spelling and grammar issues

  • The employer puts pressure on you to act urgently

  • There is a monetary transaction involved (such as the employer wanting to send you a check)

  • You have to pay to work (such as being asked to purchase materials)

As a general rule, job seekers should only look for remote jobs using a reputable job board.

4. Consider your relevant skills

Your next step is to determine what kind of job you’re looking for, which will likely be based on your skills, qualifications, and experience.

For example, many remote developer jobs require specific experience working as a software developer.

Other roles, such as a graphic designer or social media assistant, may be available to those with relevant education but without previous experience.

Of course, there are several entry-level work-from-home jobs for those who don’t have specific qualifications or remote work experience.

Such positions include:

  • Virtual assistant

  • Transcriptionist

  • Survey conductor

  • Telemarketer

  • Remote call center representative

5. Understand what remote employers are looking for

Thousands of job seekers are applying for remote jobs every month, but only those who speak directly to the hiring manager’s desires will land the gig.

To be successful, you need to understand the key skills and characteristics remote employers are looking for. These managers typically want employees who are:

  • Highly organized and skilled at planning

  • Self-motivated and proactive

  • Great communicators

  • Willing to learn and adapt to new ways of working

  • Technologically literate

  • Independent workers

  • Reliable and punctual

Before diving into the remote world, it’s important that you honestly assess your character against the above requirements.

If you feel like those traits describe you well, then you’d be a good candidate for remote work.

Make sure to communicate those skills and character traits in your cover letter and resume.

6. Get your resume ready

Your resume is your first impression. It’s your first chance to sell who you are and why you’d be a great fit for the job.

A great resume can be the difference between being one of the few applicants who land the interview and one of the other 200+ job seekers who don’t make the cut.

Your resume should:

  • Speak directly to the job advertisement by describing how your skills and experience match the job description

  • Provide recruiters with an overview of your work history

  • Use simple formatting to get past ATS systems

(Image Source)

For more resume inspiration, check out our article: 3 resume examples that will land you a job in 2021.

7. Prepare for the interview

Once you’ve applied for a few remote jobs, it’s time to get prepared for your first interview.

Bear in mind that this interview will likely be virtual (using video conferencing software), which has some subtle differences while being similar to in-person interviews.

Prepare for this interview by practicing questions and answers with a friend or family member, and remember to:

  • Check your tech before you meet

  • Position yourself in front of a neutral, non-distracting background

  • Project your voice and pause after speaking (video can be a little laggy sometimes)

  • Use facial expressions to communicate meaning (as body language is less obvious over video)

Read more tips for remote interviews here: 9 tips to ace your virtual interview.

8. Make sure you’re remote-ready

Your last step in preparing for a remote job is setting yourself up with the right equipment.

Some remote companies may assist here. For example, they might provide a work laptop, or your salary package may include contributions toward work-from-home equipment (like buying an ergonomic chair).

At a minimum, here’s what you’ll need to be equipped for remote work:

  • A computer to work from

  • A stable internet connection

  • A desk and office chair

For a more comfortable home office setup, consider getting yourself an external computer monitor as well as a wireless keyboard and mouse.

​​Where to find remote jobs

The best place to look for remote job listings is to browse job boards online.

The Jobcase remote job board has tons of remote job opportunities. Check it out here. You can search for your location and filter specifically for remote work on the left-hand side.

(Source)

Ready to find your first remote opportunity?

Millions of employees love working for remote companies, as it gives them the freedom and flexibility to manage their work-life balance.

Plus, who wouldn’t benefit from cutting down on commuting and winning back a few hours each week?

Now that you’ve been briefed on the eight steps to landing a remote job, it’s time to get applying!

Check out our guide on putting together a powerful resume, and start browsing job postings on the Jobcase job board.

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Janice Reed
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Dorothy McNeal

Yes, very interested. Please send information on resume writing.

3w
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Doretha White

Yes! I'm interested please

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Md.Yeasin Hosen Manik

Please send me information! Thank you for your time.

11w
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Md.Yeasin Hosen Manik

Yes, I'm Interested! for job

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Nytara Greathouse

Yes, I'm Interested!

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Michelle Wadas

Please send me information! Thank you for your time.

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Silvia Burbano

Interested

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Saadia Abdelaziz

Interested

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Sara Pope

Interested

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Evelyne Ben Dedale

Very understandable and thank you for advice...Very appreciated

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